1971 Corvette Stingray Overview

The 1971 Corvette Stingray is part of the C3 design group of
Chevrolet Corvette vehicles. The C3 terminology is used to identify that
the 1971 model of the Corvette was part of the third major redesign of
the vehicle after its initial production. The C3 design scheme was in
use from 1968 through 1982; as such the 1971 model does not vary
significantly from the vehicles that immediately preceded it (up to 3
years prior), but it is different from vehicles that were in existence
prior to 1968.

Changes for the 1971 Corvette Stingray

One major change that Chevrolet did make specifically for the 1971
Corvette Stingray has to do with the engine compression. The engine
compression ratios were decreased in an attempt to make the Corvette
Stingray compatible with lower-grade fuel types. The result was that the
horsepower of the vehicle decreased as well, much to the
dissatisfaction of designers and customers alike. As a result, Chevrolet
continued to experiment with engine compression design in the following
model years, making the 1971 Corvette Stingray unique amongst other
vehicles in the C3 group. Additionally, previous vehicles had been named
“Sting Ray,” while this model of car elided the name into one single
word.

1971 Corvette Stingray Specs

Although the first models of C3 Corvettes had horsepower ranging in
the 300 bhp range, the 1971 model had decreased horsepower as a result
of the changes that Chevrolet made in the engine compression system.
This resulted in horsepower ratings that typically hovered around 200
bhp. The engine is the same as that of the cars that immediately
preceded it in the C3 group and features 5.7 liters in total capacity.

The engine systems and other internal components of the C3 class of
Corvette Stingray models were generally the same as those from the
previous C2 vehicles. However, the interior space within the car and
some of the external features were changed. The C3 vehicles have added
interior space and a redesigned seating configuration and dash, setting
these cars apart from their predecessors in terms of style and
aesthetic.

As a sports car, the 1971 Corvette Stingray was intended to be sold
to individual drivers or couples. The lack of ample seating and storage
space makes this car a generally poor choice for a family vehicle. The
powerful engine and excellent handling of this vehicle further enhance
its appeal as a sports car as well.