Public Reveal for the #1 1960 Briggs Cunningham Corvette Canceled Due to Undisclosed Security Concerns

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Public Reveal for #1 1960 Briggs Cunningham Corvette Canceled Due to Undisclosed Security Concerns

The public reveal of the #1 1960 Briggs Cunningham Corvette racer Friday afternoon at the Corvettes at Carlisle show in Carlisle, PA. was canceled due to security concerns. A statement from Lance Miller was read to the crowd who gathered at the grandstand to witness the unveiling of the former Le Mans Corvette, which had just been found after being lost for 50 years.

Here is the statement from Lance Miller, co-owner of Carlisle events:

?We had hoped to present the 1960 No. 1 Le Mans Corvette to you today. As you probably know, after I purchased the car in Florida and brought it to Pennsylvania, we held an event last night to reveal it. As you also know, I have sold the car to a third party, who wishes to remain anonymous at this time. Unfortunately, for security reasons, the car has had to be moved to an undisclosed location. While I am disappointed, as I am sure you are, it was important to respect the buyer’s wishes in this matter. I have confidence that the car will be well cared for, and we hope to have it back here in Carlisle at a future show looking better than ever.?

The former Corvette racer was shown to a group of Corvette enthusiasts at a private event the day before. At that event, we learned that Miller purchased the Corvette from Richard Carr and then sold it two days later to an undisclosed buyer who wishes to remain anonymous.

Many in the assembled crowd at the show’s grandstands weren’t happy with the last minute cancelation including one gentleman we talked to who said the reveal was one of the primary reasons for attending the show in the first place.

The Corvette is scheduled to undergo restoration at Kevin Mackay’s Corvette Repair show in Valley Stream, NY.

The Briggs Cunningham Corvette was discovered in a St. Peterburg, Florida warehouse where it had been stored since the 1970′s. A google search of the VIN by Richard Carr’s brother identified it as one of the three 1960 Briggs Cunningham Corvettes which were campaigned at the 1960 24 Hours of Le Mans. In that race, the #1 Corvette went off course after a light rain made the track slipperly and it rolled over and caught on fire.

Following the race, the Corvettes were sent back to the states where they were converted back to street use and sold.

At some point in its history, the #1 Corvette was turned into a drag car and it was rebodied with a custom 1957 fiberglass kit which dramatically changed the look of the vehicle, but many of the custom mechanical changes made by the Briggs Cunningham racing team were still in place.

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