Harmony in Balkans… C7 Undergoes Eastern European Track Testing

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Check out this video showing Chevrolet testing a trio of C7s – two Torch Reds and a Velocity Yellow – on the Navak track in Belgrad, Serbia.

The Stingray has already been tested on the German Autobahn, where it roared to speeds of 300 km/h, as well as in France, Switzerland, and the Netherlands.

The 2014 Corvette will be arriving at European dealers soon, and some lucky folks over there will be able to purchase new Stingrays (available only in Z51 form) at a cost of €69,990 in mainland Europe and £61,495 in the United Kingdom.

Since they're Z51s, that means these cars will deliver 460 horsepower and 630 Nm of torque, figures that pleased the narrator in this video, Patrick Hermann, technical manager communications Chevrolet Europe.

The Z51 package, of course, includes enhanced aero package for optimized high-speed stability, electronic limited-slip differential, specific shocks, springs and stabilizer bars, specific performance gear ratio, dry-sump oiling system, differential and transmission cooling, larger front and rear wheels and tires, and larger front and rear brakes.

“We have so many interesting new developments in the car, like the active differential we have, like the new full electronic steering gear,” Hermann says.

What makes the latest Corvette so special to him, he says, “is that all the little parts coming together in very nice way, like the design, like the new technology, and how they blend together without losing the ideas about a Corvette.”

Hermann points out that the Corvette remains a daily driver but “we have such a sharp car on the track. What I always enjoy is how powerful the car is and how much torque it can deliver and it’s nice to enjoy all the talk when you’re driving on the track and you know how to handle it. But it’s also refined and precise and how all the electronics systems can help you without taking the fun away and the emotions that this car is delivering.”

And driving on the track, Hermann emphasizes, “is pure emotion, and this car is delivering it.”

He likes being able to select the level of support the car can offer the driver.

“And again I can switch it totally off if I’m feeling, ‘OK, I want to be in control from everything,’ and then I’m the driver and I’m totally in control, but as in the case of the limited slip differential, I’m getting all the traction support and I’m enjoying having all the power come out of it.”


Source:
AutoEvolution.com