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Old 02-07-2017, 09:13 AM   #1
bluestreak63
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Default Leaving on jack stands

Is it advisable to leave the vette on jack stands at the four jacking points for an undetermined amount of time? I'm going to get working on the brakes as I have time and instead of wasting time jacking up, taking the tires off, etc., can I just leave it on the Jack stands?

Will it have an adverse affect on the suspension, steering components, anything that would be hanging down by gravity?
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Old 02-07-2017, 09:19 AM   #2
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I would say your good
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Old 02-07-2017, 09:19 AM   #3
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Default All jacked up

I left my 68 in storage on jack stands with the wheels off for a few years. No problem with the suspension or anything else. Jerry
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Old 02-07-2017, 09:23 AM   #4
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Its prob fine. But doing a complete brake job (excluding hard lines) is a 2-4 hour job so why not just carve out a window of time to do it all at once....and its prob safer.

Seems to me grabbing a random 10 minutes here and there on a safety related maintenance task is a way to screw it up..
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Old 02-07-2017, 10:35 AM   #5
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The rear suspension will go into a 'full rebound' -- that is, the leaf spring will unload & arc pulling the rear shocks to their fully extended position/dimension. I've experienced leaking hydraulic fluid from shocks that have taken that stress for months at a time.

Placing a 1/2 or 9/16" bolt in the frame pocket below the trailing arm before jacking will keep trailing arms and shocks close to their 'normal' driving position. I find it easier to work on, change shocks, bleed brakes, and the like. Hard to see in the pic below, but note the bolt with pink 'remove' flag.


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Old 02-07-2017, 10:53 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frankie the Fink View Post
Its prob fine. But doing a complete brake job (excluding hard lines) is a 2-4 hour job so why not just carve out a window of time to do it all at once....and its prob safer.

Seems to me grabbing a random 10 minutes here and there on a safety related maintenance task is a way to screw it up..
Yeah, wouldn't that be nice...

But when you have a full time job and two young kids, sometimes 15 minutes is all you get. So if I can pull the wheel cylinder off and put the new one on, job done.

I'm taking my time, after all, it's been a 3 year brake job.

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The rear suspension will go into a 'full rebound' -- that is, the leaf spring will unload & arc pulling the rear shocks to their fully extended position/dimension. I've experienced leaking hydraulic fluid from shocks that have taken that stress for months at a time.

Placing a 1/2 or 9/16" bolt in the frame pocket below the trailing arm before jacking will keep trailing arms and shocks close to their 'normal' driving position. I find it easier to work on, change shocks, bleed brakes, and the like. Hard to see in the pic below, but note the bolt with pink 'remove' flag.


Interesting, would have not thought of that. Trick of the trade?
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Old 02-07-2017, 11:06 AM   #7
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if I remember correctly, JohnZ once upon a time said that leaving the front suspension hanging for a long period of time (don't ask me to quantify 'long') because it stressed the rubber suspension bushings....

BUT, I have let mine 'hang' for months with no apparent repercussions (to my knowledge)

Bill
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Old 02-07-2017, 11:28 AM   #8
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Bushings are tightened at ride height. So if they sit in a twisted position for an extended time, this could indeed cause an issue. But at the same time, you're giving your tires and springs a break. Up or down, doesn't really matter. I second the opinion of getting a block of time and doing the job in one swoop over an afternoon or at worse, a weekend. If it took me years due to time constraints, I'd hire it done and drive the car. JMHO.............
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Old 02-07-2017, 11:30 AM   #9
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The problem was running the car with the C2 suspension at full extension - hard on half shaft U-joints, etc.. I did it once but only for a few seconds and VERY slowly...
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Old 02-07-2017, 11:56 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vark_wso View Post
The rear suspension will go into a 'full rebound' -- that is, the leaf spring will unload & arc pulling the rear shocks to their fully extended position/dimension. I've experienced leaking hydraulic fluid from shocks that have taken that stress for months at a time.

Placing a 1/2 or 9/16" bolt in the frame pocket below the trailing arm before jacking will keep trailing arms and shocks close to their 'normal' driving position. I find it easier to work on, change shocks, bleed brakes, and the like. Hard to see in the pic below, but note the bolt with pink 'remove' flag.


I place my front jack stands on the lower control arm spring pockets (with padding) to keep the front suspension at normal ride height and either do as vark_wso suggests for the rear or use another set of jack stands under the trailing arms to keep the rear suspension at/near normal ride height.

FWIW.

Larry
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Old 02-07-2017, 01:58 PM   #11
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Once all those bushings are installed on the assembly line, they are always in a strain. Tension, compression torsional or a combination of these. Doesn't matter if the wheels are on the ground, driving down the road or up in the air.

I have cars that have had the wheels suspended off/on for years and have noticed no more than what I'd consider normal wear and tear for 50+ year old suspensions.

PS. Midyears that have longer than stock length rear shocks shouldn't have the axle spun due to the extra length causing the half shafts to bind from excess angle. Stock length shocks seem like they are okay.

Last edited by MikeM; 02-07-2017 at 02:01 PM.
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Old 02-08-2017, 12:18 AM   #12
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A little off-topic, but I left my C4 on front jack stands for about 8 weeks.

When I took it down, it had developed a small coolant leak under the front of the engine. But like a said - this is a C4.
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Old 02-08-2017, 07:27 PM   #13
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The last time I worked on my rear brakes I shimmed under the trailing arm and frame pocket to keep the wheels from drooping down. Worked well but you need something pretty tough as that point would make a dandy pecan cracker - lots of pressure from the spring and leverage. I tried some wood shims first and it nearly sheared them in two.
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Old 02-08-2017, 08:14 PM   #14
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I prefer to have my old cars movable or "rollable" in case of emergency like fire. Even if they aren't running I can push them outside in a few seconds to avoid total loss. Storing them up on stands may be better for them long term but it won't matter if they're crispy critters. Besides the best way to maintain any piece of machinery is to use it on a regular basis even when it's "stored".
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Old 02-08-2017, 08:29 PM   #15
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When I worked oversea's I use to store the '67' for a year at a time. I got some old wooden blocks(10"x10") and placed them under the end of the spring in the rear and in-board slightly from the lower ball joints on the lower 'A' frame in the front. The wheels just cleared the ground. The placement of the wooden blocks made it where the suspension hung but not completely, as it still had some compression on it. I poured some "Fuel Fresh" stabilizer in the tank and filled it up. Ran it for a few minutes to get it circulated into the carb. I removed the plugs and sprayed a mixture of Marvel Mystery oil and 20W in each cylinder. When I returned every year she started right. Never had any problems. Oh yea, also put dessicant bags through out the car.
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Old 02-08-2017, 11:21 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Desert Nomad View Post
When I worked oversea's I use to store the '67' for a year at a time. I got some old wooden blocks(10"x10") and placed them under the end of the spring in the rear and in-board slightly from the lower ball joints on the lower 'A' frame in the front. The wheels just cleared the ground. The placement of the wooden blocks made it where the suspension hung but not completely, as it still had some compression on it. I poured some "Fuel Fresh" stabilizer in the tank and filled it up. Ran it for a few minutes to get it circulated into the carb. I removed the plugs and sprayed a mixture of Marvel Mystery oil and 20W in each cylinder. When I returned every year she started right. Never had any problems. Oh yea, also put dessicant bags through out the car.
sounds good, but I wouldn't use dessicant bags without placing them in a bowl or something because they can absorb water to the point of being soggy and could make a mess if sitting directly on something

Bill

Last edited by wmf62; 02-08-2017 at 11:21 PM.
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Old 02-09-2017, 01:17 PM   #17
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sounds good, but I wouldn't use dessicant bags without placing them in a bowl or something because they can absorb water to the point of being soggy and could make a mess if sitting directly on something

Bill
Good point. Another thing I forgot to mention, is I put steel wool in the end of the exhaust pipe to prevent any mice from going up in. Probably over kill but I remember hearing that from a reliable source. Over the years I had it stored, I only found one dead mouse shriveled up in the corner of the garage by the door. Luckily none ever made it in the car.
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Old 02-09-2017, 01:49 PM   #18
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Quote:
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Good point. Another thing I forgot to mention, is I put steel wool in the end of the exhaust pipe to prevent any mice from going up in. Probably over kill but I remember hearing that from a reliable source. Over the years I had it stored, I only found one dead mouse shriveled up in the corner of the garage by the door. Luckily none ever made it in the car.
Stainless steel "steel wool" I hope, I have to use that in my house bathroom vents to keep the critters and wasps out
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Old 02-09-2017, 03:38 PM   #19
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Quote:
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Stainless steel "steel wool" I hope, I have to use that in my house bathroom vents to keep the critters and wasps out
Can't remember if SS or not. Just picked up a bag at the local HD. It was a fairly dry area(Haywood CA.) so I wasn't expecting much moisture. Also put numerous trays of mouse/rat poisoning around the garage. That probably explains the dead mouse. With all that prep I did, once back overseas, I began worrying about earthquakes or fires which you really don't have any control over. Got to have something to worry about. Glad I'm back now.
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Old 02-10-2017, 02:02 PM   #20
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On the front, I would just loosen the control arm bushing bolts.

For the rears, what I have done is use ratchet straps to lift up the T-arms.
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