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Old 10-13-2009, 04:05 PM   #1
rgpta
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Default Rear wheel bearing replacement

I reomved the spindles from my 76 vette to replace bearings and spindles. Not sure if I am to press the bearings on the spindle or in the control arm. When I removed one bearing remained on the spindle and one still in the arm.
can someone point me in the right direction? procedures and pictures? do I need special tools or can I tap in the bearings in the control arm.
Also I am not sure what how to shim as well, is the distance between the spacers? How much shim is needed?
Sorry for the stupid questions, but new at this.
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Old 10-13-2009, 04:16 PM   #2
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This may be a job you may wish to call the experts in on. There are many vendors here who will rebuild your trailing arms for you or sell you an exchange unit. You do need some special tools to pull the bearings, set up the proper clearance and press the new bearings back on. This is one job that many C3 enthusiasts wish to stay away from. Also if one of your bearings remained on the arm, that indicates that someone may have made some modifications to the spindle as these bearings are pressed on and they do not slide off easily. And no, there are no stupid questions here.
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Old 10-13-2009, 07:05 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rgpta View Post
I reomved the spindles from my 76 vette to replace bearings and spindles. Not sure if I am to press the bearings on the spindle or in the control arm. When I removed one bearing remained on the spindle and one still in the arm.
can someone point me in the right direction? procedures and pictures? do I need special tools or can I tap in the bearings in the control arm.
Also I am not sure what how to shim as well, is the distance between the spacers? How much shim is needed?
Sorry for the stupid questions, but new at this.
You need to either acquire the tools ( bearing set-up tool, dial-indicator, spindle installation tool, torque wrench, bearing race installation tool, assortment of shims, bearing puller (so you can remove the bearing off of the spindle.)) HOPEFULLY you did damage your spindle when you removed it..because there is a special tool to make sure that your do not damage the threaded end of the spindle.
Or you need to send them off for re-building...or buy a set that is rebiult and send yours in for cores.

This is a very precise procedure...to have it done correctly...but without the correct tools...you are making a BIG MISTAKE!!!

I can rebuild these for you...but it does depend on the condition of the spindle...and whether it is damaged in a way that it will not run-out correctly...due to a damaged flange (where the rotor contacts).

The choice is yours...but do a search on the forum...there is alot of posts dealing with this issue.
YOU MUST have the correct tools if youa re going to do this yourself.
"DUB"
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Old 10-13-2009, 07:47 PM   #4
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just did one of mine today rgpta, theres no way i could of done it without the tools mentioned above, and my 12ton press. i would send 'em to somebody.
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Old 10-13-2009, 11:27 PM   #5
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Default Rear Bearing Blashemy

This is one of those subject that C-3 vette owners are passionate about, with little wiggle room. I have replaced the rear bearings on all 4 of my Sharks, using the slip fit method, including my vintage road racer that I regularly take 145 mph plus. This essentially allows you to tighten the rear bearings exactly the way you do the front, on the spindles. No special tools required, just big hammer and cajones when separating the old ones from the trailing arm.
With the trailing arm out and the nut and washer removed, use a 5/8" spark plug socket the fits over the shoulder of the spindle, and beat it out of the inner bearing. Then using a bearing separater, pull the outer bearing off the spindle.
For the new assembly, mark the spindle where the inner bearing will ride, approximately. Using emery board, sand that area down until the inner bearing will just fit over with a little resistance, but still slide on and off. Now, press the new outer bearing on the spindle. I use the old bearing and a piece of pipe, until it is seated on the tapered end of the spindle. Insert this assembly (no spacers or shims needed) through the trailing arm. Now simply put the inner bearing on the spindle and tighten with the washer and nut until the bearing seats and solid friction, then back off a hole, just like a front wheel bearing.
Now you can adjust the run-out to your heart's content. Again, to the purist, this is blashemy, but it works. Good luck, whichever way you go.

Jimbo
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Old 10-13-2009, 11:42 PM   #6
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Long thread on same subject below, under "why rear bearing spacers"
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Old 10-14-2009, 12:04 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by hawgn68 View Post
Again, to the purist, this is blashemy, but it works.
Jimbo
Not only that but we're also cursed. One of these days you will spontaneously burst into flames. They've been telling me so for years.
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Old 10-14-2009, 08:31 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hawgn68 View Post
This is one of those subject that C-3 vette owners are passionate about, with little wiggle room. I have replaced the rear bearings on all 4 of my Sharks, using the slip fit method, including my vintage road racer that I regularly take 145 mph plus. This essentially allows you to tighten the rear bearings exactly the way you do the front, on the spindles. No special tools required, just big hammer and cajones when separating the old ones from the trailing arm.
With the trailing arm out and the nut and washer removed, use a 5/8" spark plug socket the fits over the shoulder of the spindle, and beat it out of the inner bearing. Then using a bearing separater, pull the outer bearing off the spindle.
For the new assembly, mark the spindle where the inner bearing will ride, approximately. Using emery board, sand that area down until the inner bearing will just fit over with a little resistance, but still slide on and off. Now, press the new outer bearing on the spindle. I use the old bearing and a piece of pipe, until it is seated on the tapered end of the spindle. Insert this assembly (no spacers or shims needed) through the trailing arm. Now simply put the inner bearing on the spindle and tighten with the washer and nut until the bearing seats and solid friction, then back off a hole, just like a front wheel bearing.
Now you can adjust the run-out to your heart's content. Again, to the purist, this is blashemy, but it works. Good luck, whichever way you go.

Jimbo
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Originally Posted by turtlevette View Post
Not only that but we're also cursed. One of these days you will spontaneously burst into flames. They've been telling me so for years.
I hope you guys used the inner and outer grease seals.
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Old 10-14-2009, 10:45 AM   #9
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I hope you guys used the inner and outer grease seals.
Yea, why wouldn't i ? How dumb do you think i am?

don't answer that.
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Old 10-14-2009, 02:55 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hawgn68 View Post
This is one of those subject that C-3 vette owners are passionate about, with little wiggle room. I have replaced the rear bearings on all 4 of my Sharks, using the slip fit method, including my vintage road racer that I regularly take 145 mph plus. This essentially allows you to tighten the rear bearings exactly the way you do the front, on the spindles. No special tools required, just big hammer and cajones when separating the old ones from the trailing arm.
With the trailing arm out and the nut and washer removed, use a 5/8" spark plug socket the fits over the shoulder of the spindle, and beat it out of the inner bearing. Then using a bearing separater, pull the outer bearing off the spindle.
For the new assembly, mark the spindle where the inner bearing will ride, approximately. Using emery board, sand that area down until the inner bearing will just fit over with a little resistance, but still slide on and off. Now, press the new outer bearing on the spindle. I use the old bearing and a piece of pipe, until it is seated on the tapered end of the spindle. Insert this assembly (no spacers or shims needed) through the trailing arm. Now simply put the inner bearing on the spindle and tighten with the washer and nut until the bearing seats and solid friction, then back off a hole, just like a front wheel bearing.
Now you can adjust the run-out to your heart's content. Again, to the purist, this is blashemy, but it works. Good luck, whichever way you go.

Jimbo
WOW, Slip fit and no spacers, at 145. Hey Y`all git out of the way!
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Old 08-26-2010, 12:26 AM   #11
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Default 1976 Rear Bearings

Hi everyone, what's the word on rear end bearing replacement on the c3s? I've read several post and the job looks scary to say the least. Right now it sounds much harder than replacing the entire hub assembly which I have done on a c4. Has anyone posted instructions with pictures? What about Hawgn68's slip and fit method? Does it work?
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Old 08-26-2010, 01:00 AM   #12
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Default Instructions.

http://duntovmotors.com/tech-rear-spindle.php
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Old 08-26-2010, 07:55 AM   #13
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Thanks. Sounds like rear bearings are bad if there is play from in the tire and assembly from 3 - 9? If we do not have play, is there a way to grease the bearings without removing disassembling?
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Old 08-26-2010, 02:04 PM   #14
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Those bearings were pressed on for a reason. I had the bearings rebuilt on my vehicle in June by Bairs. I had to buy new spindles because the surface on the spindle was ruined from the bearings being slip fit. Turtlevette, and hawgn 68...... good luck..... your decision to slip fit those wheel bearings will come back to bite you. I had do deal with the consequences from some previous owners decision to take that route. rgpta, I compliment you for tackling this job. But do not slip fit those bearings, you will regret it.
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Old 08-26-2010, 03:07 PM   #15
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But do not slip fit those bearings, you will regret it.
What happens because they're slip fit? I've never heard of anyone having problems.
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Old 08-26-2010, 03:26 PM   #16
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I rebuilt my T-arms myself, its a very technical job, you NEED the right tools. NEED. But I didn't think it was hard. I got by with a bearing set-up tool, a spindle knocker (instead of a press), and a cheap bearing separator, and I found no need to slip fit.

The bearing set-up tool is worth the money, it allows you to select the right amount of end play without having to press on and press off(and likely destroy) your new bearings.

there are a lot of good posts on here about the subject. All I can say is buy the right tools, remember to put your backing plate on first and on the right side, don't rush the process, and never, ever whack anything with a hammer.

Imho, its a technical job, but not a hard job, and when you do it right you'll feel like you can fix anything.
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Old 08-26-2010, 03:41 PM   #17
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What happens because they're slip fit? I've never heard of anyone having problems.
The tight fit is for 'belts and suspenders' safety. IF the nut stays at the prescribed 100 ft/lbs torque then there is little or no chance of the races turning on the shaft. Many assemblies loose that torque and the races will spin on the shaft reducing both to scrap and possibly seizing the bear or shearing the shaft in short oder. The original '63-'64 assemblies were slip fit, GM modified this to tight fit in late '64 (IIRC) because of field problems.

Drum brake cars will loose the rear wheel just to add insult to injury.
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Old 08-28-2010, 11:09 AM   #18
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Thanks all. I definately intend to do it right. Something jamming up at times up between the U-Joints and bearings on the passenger side. I removed the passenger side axle yesterday so I can change the U-Joints. Looks like the weekend of 9/10 will be start of the bearing job.
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Old 08-28-2010, 12:18 PM   #19
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then there is little or no chance of the races turning on the shaft..
What keeps them from turning on the shaft in the front?
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Old 08-28-2010, 12:37 PM   #20
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What keeps them from turning on the shaft in the front?
Magic.

Why are spun races seen only on the rear?
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Old 08-28-2010, 12:37 PM
 
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