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Old 04-15-2008, 09:59 PM   #1
verano29
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Default Scotch Brite and engine cleaning

I used scotch brite pads and wd-40 to clean the deck on my head swap. I've since learned that some people are recommending not to use scotch brite when cleaning engine parts due to the possibility of the small aluminum particals which are embedded in the pad getting into the oil and embedding themselves into the bearing material.

How many of you (and I know there are a few) used scotch brite to clean your motors? Did you have any problems? Any recommendations? Should I get the car back together and sell it before I have major issues or is this all bull crap related to other mechanic myths like "don't mix conventional and synthetic oils"?

Any other thoughts?
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Old 04-15-2008, 10:12 PM   #2
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I used the green scotch brite pads found in the kitchen section of the grocery store if that makes any difference, which I think it does, it looks like these pads are actually made of nylon fibers and wood particals.

http://www.3m.com/intl/ca/english/ce...questions.html
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Old 04-15-2008, 10:40 PM   #3
10U 99
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if you were cleaning by hand with lots of wd it's doubtful you did any damage. if it is indeed nylon you have no worries
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Old 04-15-2008, 10:43 PM   #4
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I'm not sure what they are made out of. The 3m site says nylon and wood, but I used the green pads...they might be aluminum oxide.

I did use lots of wd40 but I would think that could be worse as it traps all of the material and makes it easier for it to slip past the rings.

Anybody out there use scotch brite without any problems.
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Old 04-15-2008, 10:51 PM   #5
verano29
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This GM bulletin talks about not using surface conditioning discs. I'm hoping that the pads I used don't fall into this category.

http://www.goodwrench.com/_res/pdf/E...Procedures.pdf
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Old 04-15-2008, 10:57 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by verano29 View Post
This GM bulletin talks about not using surface conditioning discs. I'm hoping that the pads I used don't fall into this category.

http://www.goodwrench.com/_res/pdf/E...Procedures.pdf

yes, using products like the Rol Loc system on a drill with scotch brite is a no-no on aluminum. as is a sharp gasket scraper
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Old 04-15-2008, 11:02 PM   #7
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The warning I got from my engine builder was using the disc on gasket surfaces as it can wear surfaces unevenly and leave residue inside. If you did it by hand I wouldn't worry too much,I'd use a good filter and drain/change oil and filter shortly after fire up and warm up.You get all kinds of stuff down inside on a swap like that anyhow. So run it ,flush it and you should be good to go.
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Old 04-15-2008, 11:11 PM   #8
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I didn't use disks, just small squares of the green stuff (grocery store variery) with lots of wd40 being quite careful not allow any stuff to get into the motor. The lifter valleys were completely covered and very little (dirty wd40), if any, visibly made it into the cylinders.

Still worried though. Anybody know what the green pads are made out of (found in the supermarket)?
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Old 04-16-2008, 12:20 AM   #9
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All I can find is that they are made out of "synthetic fiber". You would think that if they were carbide or aluminum oxide you would have to wear eye protection to use. I use these things in my kitchen all the time...I never knew there could be potential issues.

Anybody out there use these things?
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Old 04-16-2008, 12:43 AM   #10
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Here's all I can find about these pads, these seem to be the same pads I used although I bought mine at walgreens drug store and they cam in a package of 3. It says that they are made of a synthetic fiber. I'm not sure what that means but I also found some more industrial scotch-brite pads/discs on the site that definitly says that they are made of/contain aluminum oxide.

The GM posting warns of using aluminum oxide material. I would hope that if the pads that I bought at a drug store were are eye level of children walking by contained carbide or aluminum oxide these things would aleast come in a sealed package or contained a warning and recommend using eye protection....never knew cleaning my kitchen or motor was so dangerous.

Somebody please step in and tell me what they things are made of so I can get some sleep!!!

http://products3.3m.com/catalog/us/e...er/output_html
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Old 04-16-2008, 01:21 AM   #11
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Ok, I've read several threads about scotch brite pads and bearing failure. Nobody seems to agree on whether or not it is an issue or not. In addition it seems to only an issue when using metalic type scotch brite discs and a grinder where either the metalic particles from the pad or motor dust enter the unproteced lifter valley.

I've also read about people flushing their motors regardless with some type of solvent before starting the motor after significant work. Can anyone recommend a procedure for doing this?
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Old 04-16-2008, 08:10 AM   #12
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http://www.goodwrench.com/_res/pdf/E...Procedures.pdf

I found this Goodwrench bulleten on scotchbrite . Chuck.
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Old 04-16-2008, 09:05 AM   #13
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Scotchbrite is pretty abrasive, that might be the problem, scratching into the aluminum sealing surface. I will tell you that even the softer Scotchbrite will scratch GLASS, so DON"T use it to clean a heavy layer of bugs off your windshield, even with lots of glass cleaner solution. Don't ask.
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Old 04-16-2008, 09:08 AM   #14
verano29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by c5chines View Post
http://www.goodwrench.com/_res/pdf/E...Procedures.pdf

I found this Goodwrench bulleten on scotchbrite . Chuck.

I posted the same one above, but thanks for the info. In this pdf they talk about prohibiting the use of surface conditioning disks, which to me imply sloppy mechanic work. I imagine they are referring to the sloppy mechanic practice of using an air tool and an aluminum-oxide/carbide impregenated pad and "sanding" off the gasket material dry without any trouble. I've spoken with a few people, and found many sites that claim to use scotch brite without any issues. I'm not sure what the pads (the 3m site says "synthetic fiber" as opposed to some which are made from aluminum oxide or other types of metal) I used are made of but they were soaked in wd40 and I made sure to minimize any of the fluid that could have seeped into the cylinders..which I promptly cleaned up.

Thanks for the info!
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Old 04-16-2008, 01:26 PM   #15
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Can anyone recommend a good cylinder/piston cleaning procedure that I can use to elliminate any possibility of leaving some particles behind?
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Old 04-16-2008, 01:26 PM
 
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