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Old 03-18-2011, 09:56 AM   #1
b4i4getit
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Default Z06 Oil Change

I see that for DIY oil changes on the Z06 everybody always has the rear end jacked up as well. If you just drive the front up on ramps to do the oil change how much oil do you REALLY miss by not having the car level ? Is it significant ?
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Old 03-18-2011, 10:41 AM   #2
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one of the drain plugs is in the front of the pan. You'll leave 1/2 quart or so of old oil in the engine.
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Old 03-18-2011, 01:09 PM   #3
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Since the OP question was answered, I will hijack the thread to ask another.

If the oil isn't supposed to be checked until 5-20 minutes after the engine/oil is fully warmed up, then how is it possible to start the engine after oil and filter change and then check the oil after running for less than a minute to get an accurate reading?

The manual explicitly states not to check the oil when cold or with the engine running as the dipstick will not provide an accurate reading then.

It seems to me like you should be able to calibrate the dipstick to be accurate when checking the oil when it is either completely COLD (overnight) or running at normal temperature.
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Old 03-18-2011, 04:36 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fmarshall View Post
Since the OP question was answered, I will hijack the thread to ask another.

If the oil isn't supposed to be checked until 5-20 minutes after the engine/oil is fully warmed up, then how is it possible to start the engine after oil and filter change and then check the oil after running for less than a minute to get an accurate reading?

The manual explicitly states not to check the oil when cold or with the engine running as the dipstick will not provide an accurate reading then.

It seems to me like you should be able to calibrate the dipstick to be accurate when checking the oil when it is either completely COLD (overnight) or running at normal temperature.
In a wet sump engine, all the oil drains back into the oil pan after shutdown. That's where the dipstick is located. With the dry sump, the oil is stored in the reservoir and that's where the dipstick is located. After shutdown, some of the oil slowly seeps back into the oil pan, plus there is a small amount of oil in the sump that the pickup can't pump to the reservoir, thus the requirement to check the oil level after the specified time of 5 to 20 minutes. During that short interval, only a small amount of oil will drain drown from the reservoir. You let it sit for an hour or two or three, then the level of the oil in the reservoir is low and will give a wrong reading as to the TOTAL amount of oil in your engine. Best to follow GM's instructions on checking the oil level.
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Old 03-18-2011, 05:54 PM   #5
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I take about an hour or slightly more to drain all the oil out. I even get **** and tilt the back of the car up a bit so the front drain plug drains more oil out then I tilt the car slightly up on the right side to drain the side plug.

I measure out exactly what my car requires and pour that into the tank. No need to check the oil level after an oil change is done. I'll only check after I drive the car like what GM requires after the oil is hot.

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Old 03-18-2011, 07:44 PM   #6
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I read the manual before posting.

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After changing the oil and inserting the drain plugs, it says to start the engine, run for 15 seconds, then check the oil quantity - which will not yield the desired results.

On a 911, which this isn't, where dry sumps have been for many, many years, the engine oil used to be checked with the engine running. On a Corvette, it "could" be checked running or static, if the dip stick were calibrated that way.

Maybe this is an opportunity to market a new product ...

Last edited by fmarshall; 03-18-2011 at 07:50 PM.
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Old 03-18-2011, 09:48 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fmarshall View Post
I read the manual before posting.

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After changing the oil and inserting the drain plugs, it says to start the engine, run for 15 seconds, then check the oil quantity - which will not yield the desired results.
On a 911, which this isn't, where dry sumps have been for many, many years, the engine oil used to be checked with the engine running. On a Corvette, it "could" be checked running or static, if the dip stick were calibrated that way.

Maybe this is an opportunity to market a new product ...
No, it says to start and run the engine for 15 seconds to circulate the new oil. Then it says to shut off the engine and then check the engine as the manual describes for the Z06. That means to wait 5-20 minutes to check the level.

Btw, the Z06 is not a 911, so check the oil as described for a Z06, not as described for a 911, by P.
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Old 03-18-2011, 10:02 PM   #8
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Marking this for future reference.
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Old 03-18-2011, 11:18 PM   #9
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JoesC5,

Thanks for the procedure correction. Wouldn't running it up for 15 seconds and shutting it off not get the oil up to operating temperature? And the procedure to check the oil is to run the engine to get it to operating temperature. Maybe that doesn't matter after draining the oil for an hour and then filling. That's what I was getting at.

And I know this isn't a 911 - I stated so: "On a 911, which this isn't,". My point was that with a dry sump system -on a 911, a Corvette, or even on aircraft - it is possible to run the engine at idle and measure the the quantity in the tank.

Why GM decided to make a procedure that was different may be because they had no previous experience with dry sump oil systems - I don't know.

I'll do some record keeping of my own to determine if it is necessary to take such a scenic route.

If serviced properly, the oil will be at a certain point on the dipstick when the engine is idling and warmed up. That being the case, you would be able to check the oil quantity accurately before shutting the engine off.

It just isn't documented.

And one way would be exactly equal to the other way in terms of the quantity of oil present. Think of it as check tires pressures at different outside air temperatures.

30 PSI at 32 degrees won't be 30 PSI at 100 degrees.

Last edited by fmarshall; 03-18-2011 at 11:23 PM.
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Old 03-19-2011, 09:46 AM   #10
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Quote:
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JoesC5,

Thanks for the procedure correction. Wouldn't running it up for 15 seconds and shutting it off not get the oil up to operating temperature? And the procedure to check the oil is to run the engine to get it to operating temperature. Maybe that doesn't matter after draining the oil for an hour and then filling. That's what I was getting at.

And I know this isn't a 911 - I stated so: "On a 911, which this isn't,". My point was that with a dry sump system -on a 911, a Corvette, or even on aircraft - it is possible to run the engine at idle and measure the the quantity in the tank.

Why GM decided to make a procedure that was different may be because they had no previous experience with dry sump oil systems - I don't know.

I'll do some record keeping of my own to determine if it is necessary to take such a scenic route.

If serviced properly, the oil will be at a certain point on the dipstick when the engine is idling and warmed up. That being the case, you would be able to check the oil quantity accurately before shutting the engine off.

It just isn't documented.

And one way would be exactly equal to the other way in terms of the quantity of oil present. Think of it as check tires pressures at different outside air temperatures.

30 PSI at 32 degrees won't be 30 PSI at 100 degrees.
The manual says to run the engine until it is at at least 175*. They are talking coolant temp, not oil temp. If you were to start a cold engine and run it until the coolant temp read 175*, I doubt if the oil temp would have reached ambient air temp + 20*. If you change the oil when the engine is warm, and then run it for 15 seconds, you have pretty much replicated the initial instructions. Not sure, but I suspect the reason GM calls for checking the oil with the engine off and to wait 5 minutes, is because the reservoir has a built in air/oil separator. Running, I imagine that there is a lot of oil being thrown around in the top portion of the reservoir, that would be all over the dipstick, making a clear reading near impossible.
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Old 03-19-2011, 10:15 AM   #11
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What are you DIY'ers doing about lubing the rear sway bar end links. After one track event mine make all sorts of noise. My dealer lubes them during oil changes.

Tom
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Old 03-19-2011, 10:45 AM   #12
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Are you talking sway bar end links or is it the tie rod at the back suspension??? There is a tie rod for toe adjustment at the back and it has a grease fitting on the bottom. GM recommends adding some grease to the fitting every 10,000 miles or so, more if you track the car.

Sway bar shouldn't need any lube, maybe some if there is some squeaking noise from the bushings and you know it is coming from the sway bar bushings.
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Old 03-19-2011, 03:48 PM   #13
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In the service manual, the procedure for changing the oil is somewhat different.

It says to remove the filler cap, lift the car, remove the two drain plugs, remove and replace the filter. Reinstall the drain plugs.

Add 10-1/2 quarts of oil, check the oil level, lower car, start engine and check for leaks. Then shut engine off and after 2-3 minutes to check the oil. Not the 5-20 minutes in the owner's manual.

No need for the pros to wait so long. In fact, they aren't even directed to warm up the engine. Probably, because in the days of sludge from non-detergent oil- which this isn't - that was a necessary step.
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Old 03-19-2011, 05:19 PM   #14
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Quote:
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In the service manual, the procedure for changing the oil is somewhat different.

It says to remove the filler cap off the oil tank, not the valve cover, lift the car, remove the two drain plugs, remove and replace the filter. Reinstall the drain plugs.

Add 10-1/2 quarts of oil, check the oil level, lower car, start engine and check for leaks. Then shut engine off and after 2-3 minutes to check the oil. Not the 5-20 minutes in the owner's manual.

No need for the pros to wait so long. In fact, they aren't even directed to warm up the engine. Probably, because in the days of sludge from non-detergent oil- which this isn't - that was a necessary step.
Fixed
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Old 03-19-2011, 08:54 PM   #15
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Fixed
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Old 03-20-2011, 09:37 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cman01 View Post
Are you talking sway bar end links or is it the tie rod at the back suspension??? There is a tie rod for toe adjustment at the back and it has a grease fitting on the bottom. GM recommends adding some grease to the fitting every 10,000 miles or so, more if you track the car.

Sway bar shouldn't need any lube, maybe some if there is some squeaking noise from the bushings and you know it is coming from the sway bar bushings.
My bad - wrong terminology. This is from page 437 of the 2007 Owners Manual:

(b) Visually inspect front and rear suspension and
steering system for damaged, loose, or missing
parts or signs of wear. Inspect power steering lines
and hoses for proper hook-up, binding, leaks,
cracks, chafing, etc. If you have the Z06 or Z51
performance package, lubricate the outer ends of
both rear toe-links.


So my question remains, how do you DIY'ers lube these fittings. I know mine needed lubing (which my dealer did) after 56 laps at Road America as they started making noise after the event. Lubing cure it. My 06 Z51 experienced the same symptoms after a HSDE at RA back in 2006, that's why I was aware of the need to lube these fittings.

Tom
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Old 03-20-2011, 11:09 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AFVETTE View Post
My bad - wrong terminology. This is from page 437 of the 2007 Owners Manual:

(b) Visually inspect front and rear suspension and
steering system for damaged, loose, or missing
parts or signs of wear. Inspect power steering lines
and hoses for proper hook-up, binding, leaks,
cracks, chafing, etc. If you have the Z06 or Z51
performance package, lubricate the outer ends of
both rear toe-links.


So my question remains, how do you DIY'ers lube these fittings. I know mine needed lubing (which my dealer did) after 56 laps at Road America as they started making noise after the event. Lubing cure it. My 06 Z51 experienced the same symptoms after a HSDE at RA back in 2006, that's why I was aware of the need to lube these fittings.

Tom
Just use a grease gun with a flexible hose. On my spyder wheels I just reach thru the wheel and attach the hose and add grease. Be careful not to add too much.
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Old 03-20-2011, 11:09 AM
 
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