C1 & C2 Corvettes General C1 Corvette & C2 Corvette Discussion, Technical Info, Performance Upgrades, Project Builds, Restorations
Sponsored by:
Sponsored by:

OT Home Welders

 
Old 11-22-2018, 11:04 AM
  #1  
woodsdesign
CF Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
woodsdesign's Avatar
 
Member Since: Jan 2004
Location: Macedonia Ohio
Posts: 2,654
Thanked 101 Times in 94 Posts
Default OT Home Welders

Guys,
I am looking to purchase a small welder for home use. I will be welding mostly corvette seat frames. I want 110 volt for convenience.
I have heard that a mig welder is the way to go.
I am hoping to get some suggestions on what type and size of welder to buy. Also, the additional equipment, like gas bottles, that are needed.
Thanks for your help.

Larry
woodsdesign is offline  
Old 11-22-2018, 11:20 AM
  #2  
Factoid
CF Senior Member
 
Factoid's Avatar
 
Member Since: Jul 2018
Location: San Antonio, TX/Mahopac, NY
Posts: 2,057
Thanked 455 Times in 357 Posts
Default

I’ve had several, but my current Millermatic 140 is by far my favorite. Red, white, or blue in order to weld true is the old saying (red-Lincoln, white-Hobart, Blue-Miller). I’ve used mine to weld everything from frame repair and new engine frame brackets to a full stainless steel exhaust system.



Factoid is offline  
Old 11-22-2018, 11:30 AM
  #3  
MikeM
CF Senior Member
 
Member Since: Mar 2003
Location: Greenville, Indiana
Posts: 22,413
Thanked 814 Times in 692 Posts
Default

I have a Lincoln 110 Volt mig. I also use the shielding gas so that is extra cost. It works good up to 3/16" steel. If you want to weld thicker material, go to 220 volts.

Anything thicker, I have a Lincoln stick welder to handle the heavy stuff.

Here's a guide to using a Lincoln Mig.

http://www.weldingtipsandtricks.com/...ig-welder.html

Whatever kind of welder you buy, pay extra and get an auto darkening helmet instead of using the cheap standard helmet included with the welder.

Sometime back, I also bought a cheap, $100 Harbor Freight mig to use in an emergency at another location.using just the shielded wire. The wire kept jamming in the feed cable. Lots of weld splatter. I threw it out for the trash man.

Last edited by MikeM; 11-22-2018 at 11:37 AM.
MikeM is online now  
The Following User Says Thank You to MikeM For This Useful Post:
woodsdesign (11-23-2018)
Old 11-22-2018, 11:37 AM
  #4  
firstgear
CF Senior Member
Support Corvetteforum!
 
firstgear's Avatar
 
Member Since: Sep 2003
Location: Norwalk ohio
Posts: 8,463
Thanked 242 Times in 182 Posts
2019 Corvette of the Year Winner
St. Jude Donor '15
Default

I have a never used Lincoln 240 volt welder I am going to sell to get a 120 volt. Yup it’s the convenience factor.
firstgear is offline  
Old 11-22-2018, 12:17 PM
  #5  
Ken Sungela
CF Senior Member
Support Corvetteforum!
 
Ken Sungela's Avatar
 
Member Since: Sep 2012
Location: Rivervale NJ
Posts: 1,244
Thanked 97 Times in 82 Posts
Default

Sounds like pretty light duty work, so you don't need anything too powerful. I have this https://www.eastwood.com/eastwood-mi...spool-gun.html and have welded steel from sheet metal up to 1/4" thick and tack welded stainless exhaust. The plastic part that holds and feeds the wire from the base unit broke after about 15 months. They replaced for free even out of the 12 month warranty. The solenoid that starts/stops the gas flow also stuck after 15 months or so, had to pay for that one myself. Other than that, more than capable. They also have this one https://www.eastwood.com/mig-welder-...5a-output.html for only $229 which would probably do what you want.
Auto darkening helmet well worth the investment. Get at least an 80 CF bottle. You can find them used on CL or ebay some times, just make sure its within the pressure test date window, or plan on paying your gas supplier a small fee to have it tested. The incremental cost to fill a relatively larger bottle is a fraction of how much more gas your're actually getting.
Ken Sungela is offline  
Old 11-22-2018, 12:23 PM
  #6  
65 Pro Vette
CF Senior Member
Support Corvetteforum!
 
65 Pro Vette's Avatar
 
Member Since: Aug 2006
Location: Horsham Pa
Posts: 2,019
Thanks: 0
Thanked 186 Times in 142 Posts
Default

I use the Lincoln 125 with bottle gas and it works very well for any kind of sheet metal and steel up the 3/16. Rather than buying a bigger machine for when I rarely weld quarter inch plate I just used my torch to heat the steal that Im welding and you can put down a perfect weld with good penetration.
65 Pro Vette is offline  
Old 11-22-2018, 01:22 PM
  #7  
cardo0
CF Senior Member
 
cardo0's Avatar
 
Member Since: Oct 2002
Location: Las Vegas - Boycott Hypocrisy!
Posts: 6,144
Thanked 203 Times in 194 Posts
Default

This what welder to buy topic comes at least once a month on this forum and everyone spills their guts talking about their welders. If you haven't done a forum search here then your not doing your homework and its wasting our time also. But please post any specific questions on any welder you are interested in.
cardo0 is offline  
Old 11-22-2018, 01:44 PM
  #8  
kellsdad
CF Senior Member
 
kellsdad's Avatar
 
Member Since: May 2001
Location: Dadeville AL
Posts: 1,845
Thanked 148 Times in 97 Posts
Default

Larry,
As an amateur home welder I'd like to share a ltttle more than which machine to buy. First, welding is not a skill that comes without practice. Plan on practicing on items similar in size, thickness and composition with your real project. That will allow you to better determine the heat setting, wire speed and bead size you want to use. You'll want to pay attention to going slow enough to let the heat penetrate both pieces without buring throught thinner pieces. And pay particular attention to beginning and ending each bead. Second, welding for beginners is typically easier when your body is comfortably positioned, the area to be welded is easy to reach and you can clearly see when the arc is on. You'll likely also discover that you're better going one direction than the other (i.e., left, right, up or down). Lastly, better machines will give you better control over heat settings and wire speed. But as long as the machine you get has the capability you need for your project, its mostly about your skill as a welder.

Last edited by kellsdad; 11-22-2018 at 01:45 PM.
kellsdad is online now  
The Following User Says Thank You to kellsdad For This Useful Post:
woodsdesign (11-22-2018)
Old 11-22-2018, 03:15 PM
  #9  
1snake
CF Senior Member
 
1snake's Avatar
 
Member Since: Dec 2007
Location: Puget Sound
Posts: 7,629
Thanked 324 Times in 270 Posts
Default

Lots of good advice in this thread. I recommend staying with the red, white or blue brands. Decide exactly what you'll be needing one for and if a bigger machine might be needed in the future once you discover how much fun welding is. Years ago I bought a 125 amp. unit and soon outgrew it. A dual voltage 210 amp. unit solved that problem. It has the convenience of 110V for the light stuff but 220V for the heavy stuff. I do a lot of fabricating using heavy steel so I picked up a plasma cutter and now hardly ever use my Oxy/Acetylene set unless I need heat for bending something.

1snake is offline  
Old 11-22-2018, 03:51 PM
  #10  
dmaxx3500
CF Senior Member
 
dmaxx3500's Avatar
 
Member Since: Jan 2008
Location: chicago
Posts: 24,258
Thanked 441 Times in 349 Posts
Default

what ever you buy

make sure its ''NOT'' a flux core wire setup

get a good RWB welder that takes a gas cyl
dmaxx3500 is online now  
Old 11-22-2018, 03:54 PM
  #11  
Robert61
CF Senior Member
 
Member Since: Oct 2016
Location: Olive branch Ms
Posts: 1,856
Thanked 312 Times in 284 Posts
Default

I know you say 110. All I can say is get a 220 you'll be glad you did at some point. I picked up my Millermatic 251 off of EBay for $450. I had to add leads a tank and gages and do a little general maintenance. I wound up with $850 in it and it works great.
Robert61 is offline  
Old 11-22-2018, 05:30 PM
  #12  
Railroadman
CF Senior Member
 
Railroadman's Avatar
 
Member Since: Aug 2008
Location: Rochester NY
Posts: 22,642
Thanked 485 Times in 313 Posts
St. Jude Donor '09-'10-'11-'12-'13-'14-'15-'16-'17-'18-19

Default

20 amp service on house current. Like it so far altho I'm still learning how to use it.

Railroadman is offline  
Old 11-22-2018, 07:27 PM
  #13  
rccarson
CF Senior Member
 
rccarson's Avatar
 
Member Since: Jun 2013
Location: The Great Pacific Northwest Washington
Posts: 171
Thanked 15 Times in 15 Posts
Default

My vote goes to the Miller140. Had it for a coupleof years and it has never disappointed!
rccarson is offline  
Old 11-22-2018, 07:45 PM
  #14  
vjjack04
CF Senior Member
 
vjjack04's Avatar
 
Member Since: Apr 2007
Location: Hereford AZ
Posts: 1,085
Thanked 62 Times in 48 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by cardo0 View Post
This what welder to buy topic comes at least once a month on this forum and everyone spills their guts talking about their welders. If you haven't done a forum search here then your not doing your homework and its wasting our time also. But please post any specific questions on any welder you are interested in.
Bother it wouldn't waste your time to not respond to the OP....
vjjack04 is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to vjjack04 For This Useful Post:
LateOutDrsMn (11-24-2018)
Old 11-22-2018, 07:47 PM
  #15  
vjjack04
CF Senior Member
 
vjjack04's Avatar
 
Member Since: Apr 2007
Location: Hereford AZ
Posts: 1,085
Thanked 62 Times in 48 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by woodsdesign View Post
Guys,
I am looking to purchase a small welder for home use. I will be welding mostly corvette seat frames. I want 110 volt for convenience.
I have heard that a mig welder is the way to go.
I am hoping to get some suggestions on what type and size of welder to buy. Also, the additional equipment, like gas bottles, that are needed.
Thanks for your help.

Larry
I have a Miller 211 and its great for even a novice like me....it will do both 120 and 210 v.....I would use shielding gas.....
vjjack04 is offline  
Old 11-22-2018, 08:05 PM
  #16  
Tonio
CF Senior Member
 
Tonio's Avatar
 
Member Since: Apr 2017
Location: Bedford New York
Posts: 1,139
Thanked 203 Times in 173 Posts
Default

I too have been using a Miller 211 for the past 8 years and it's never let me down. I've welded everything from thin sheet metal to 3/8" thick steel plate. The Autoset feature is fantastic especially for beginners.....just dial in the metal thickness and the machine self-adjusts itself for a perfect weld. Once you get the hang of it, you can manually set the wire speed and heat range to suit your welding style. Gas is a must for structural components, in my opinion. Avoid the cheap flux core welders, they just can't provide the same quality weldment as an inert gas (MIG) welder.
Tonio is offline  
Old 11-22-2018, 08:05 PM
  #17  
cardo0
CF Senior Member
 
cardo0's Avatar
 
Member Since: Oct 2002
Location: Las Vegas - Boycott Hypocrisy!
Posts: 6,144
Thanked 203 Times in 194 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by vjjack04 View Post
Bother it wouldn't waste your time to not respond to the OP....
Can to translate that into English? I don't see the OP wasting any time responding to those trying to help him. Does this topic keep returning to advertise some brand of welder? That I do wonder even if remotely possible.
cardo0 is offline  
Old 11-22-2018, 08:42 PM
  #18  
skids
CF Senior Member
 
Member Since: Jul 2004
Location: Wi
Posts: 1,241
Thanked 48 Times in 41 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by dmaxx3500 View Post
what ever you buy

make sure its ''NOT'' a flux core wire setup

get a good RWB welder that takes a gas cyl
I agree on not getting a flux core only machine, but flux core wire has its place. Use it in drafty/windy conditions, without worrying about getting porosity due to loss of shielding gas. Oh yeah, you don't buy a welder. A welder is person/robot. It's a welding machine.
skids is offline  
Old 11-22-2018, 08:52 PM
  #19  
Railroadman
CF Senior Member
 
Railroadman's Avatar
 
Member Since: Aug 2008
Location: Rochester NY
Posts: 22,642
Thanked 485 Times in 313 Posts
St. Jude Donor '09-'10-'11-'12-'13-'14-'15-'16-'17-'18-19

Default

Originally Posted by skids View Post
Oh yeah, you don't buy a welder. A welder is person/robot. It's a welding machine.
Go up to Post #12 above, and zoom in on my machine. The factory labels it "115v wire feed welder".
Railroadman is offline  
Old 11-22-2018, 09:07 PM
  #20  
skids
CF Senior Member
 
Member Since: Jul 2004
Location: Wi
Posts: 1,241
Thanked 48 Times in 41 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Railroadman View Post
Go up to Post #12 above, and zoom in on my machine. The factory labels it "115v wire feed welder".
Yes I know, it's all good though. But it's also a welding power supply. Really. As an instructor, I cannot label a power supply as a welder. It's not correct.
OK nuff said. It doesn't matter.
Happy Thanksgiving
skids is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Quick Reply: OT Home Welders


Sponsored Ads
Vendor Directory

Contact Us - About Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

© 2019 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.
 
  • Ask a Question
    Get answers from community experts
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: