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[C2] Does your C2 take a lot of effort to turn steering wheel

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[C2] Does your C2 take a lot of effort to turn steering wheel

 
Old 06-30-2019, 07:38 AM
  #41  
Joemac8
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Originally Posted by 68hemi View Post
It is a simple direct bolt on deal. The biggest problem most have is getting it to center/return properly but that has been discussed and detailed here in the forum. If you are not comfortable doing it yourself take it to a mechanic and any of them will be able to look at the existing manual steering and the kit and see how easy it is.

Another concern of mine is that my car is in rural northern Wisconsin. "Mechanics" are in plentiful supply here, people who know what they are doing around a classic Vette, not so much.
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Old 06-30-2019, 08:10 AM
  #42  
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Originally Posted by Joemac8 View Post
Another concern of mine is that my car is in rural northern Wisconsin. "Mechanics" are in plentiful supply here, people who know what they are doing around a classic Vette, not so much.
Yup - seems every place has a crop of ASE (Automobiles Since the Eighties) certified mechanics...
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Old 06-30-2019, 08:15 AM
  #43  
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My '63 has all new front end steering parts. Old 205 X 15 radial tires. Manual steering. Tie rods in the standard holes. It takes two hands on the wheel for very low speed maneuvers. The car tracks straight down the road and return on the steering wheel is great. The car was formerly owned by a service manager at a MB dealership. I suspect he optimized the caster setting for the above driving attributes and that's at least partially why the steering effort is the way it is.


My '65 has all original front end parts on it. About 40K actual miles.
Everything the way it left the factory including alignment (minus wear). Manual steering. So, the alignment is for 7.75 X 15 bias tires which are on it. The car drives down the road nice and straight with no wandering, just like it's supposed to. But, it does have the common bias ply tire habit of grabbing irregularities in the pavement. That's normal. The car steers easily on low speed maneuvers

So why the difference in steering effort between the two cars? I've posted what I think. You decide. I've said for a long time that radial tires induce more steering effort into the equation in spite of the popular notion on this forum that they make steering easier.

I'll be 77 years oid this year. Not nearly as strong as I used to be but that doesn't make me complain about steering effort. Non-event as far as I'm concerned.

There's also the fact that I learned to drive In a Model A Ford, old farm tractors, old trucks and my daily drivers never had PS or PB's until 1979. Most people that learned to drive with manual steering also quickly learned that if you're turning the steering wheel, some rotation of the road wheels is very helpful to lessen steering effort. Some here complain about not only steering effort but about braking effort as well because they're used to nothing but PB's. That's all they've known.

Of course, there's always the possibility your old car is steering hard is because there really is something wrong with it.

PS. I never liked the feel of factory power steering with the ram mounted on the drag link because there was no road feel. Magazine road test writers of the era didn't care much for it either. I believe if I wanted to add PS to any of my old cars, I'd get a power assisted rack and pinion set up. Now that's a real steering system!

Last edited by MikeM; 06-30-2019 at 08:18 AM.
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Old 06-30-2019, 09:21 AM
  #44  
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Originally Posted by RonCL55 View Post
I agree. I have a 65 with factory PS and it is perfect. I cruise at 80 with a 14 inch steering wheel and it is perfect. I am in control, there is no steering wobble and the car runs straight and true. I can also easily parallel park.
Same here on my '65. Don't think the PS is factory, but the car drives straight and true with just a hint of heavy steering while stationary.
Unlike my '65 Nova , which wanders from lane to lane at highway speeds with just the slightest movement of the steering wheel.
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Old 06-30-2019, 09:53 AM
  #45  
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I had the factory PS (same as Corvette) on a '62 Nova. It didn't wander but like the Corvette system, no road feel. I installed it (and factory PB's) on the car and I wound up taking the PS back off because of lack of feel.
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Old 06-30-2019, 11:04 AM
  #46  
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Originally Posted by MikeM View Post
I had the factory PS (same as Corvette) on a '62 Nova. It didn't wander but like the Corvette system, no road feel. I installed it (and factory PB's) on the car and I wound up taking the PS back off because of lack of feel.
Heard the term before but what does "no road feel" mean.
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Old 06-30-2019, 11:33 AM
  #47  
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Originally Posted by MOXIE62 View Post
Heard the term before but what does "no road feel" mean.
Simply put, you can feel what the tires are doing with the road through the steering wheel if the steering has "road feel".

This guy explains it much more eloquently.

https://www.caranddriver.com/feature...atters-column/

From Edmunds.com

The "feel" of power steering systems varies widely. Many American manufacturers intentionally overboost their systems to give you that nice pinky-finger feeling on the road. Some of these systems are so soft it's like driving through oatmeal. We at Edmunds.com prefer to feel the road we're on. Your choice in power steering feel may actually dictate the kind of car you drive. Larger American cars tend to feel softer and more forgiving, while European models, in particular BMWs, feel tighter and much more responsive. Here are a few tips for getting optimal use from your power steering:
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Old 07-01-2019, 04:06 PM
  #48  
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Old 07-01-2019, 05:46 PM
  #49  
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Originally Posted by MikeM View Post
I had the factory PS (same as Corvette) on a '62 Nova. It didn't wander but like the Corvette system, no road feel. I installed it (and factory PB's) on the car and I wound up taking the PS back off because of lack of feel.
That is not true. The Corvettes used a different spring and despite what Lone Star says there IS a difference and they know it they just donít have the correct spring to sell and neither does anyone else. The factory PS with the correct spring always gave me an acceptable feel of the road and I have driven them both ways. With the spring now available not so much.
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Old 07-01-2019, 06:13 PM
  #50  
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Originally Posted by 68hemi View Post
That is not true. The Corvettes used a different spring and despite what Lone Star says there IS a difference and they know it they just donít have the correct spring to sell and neither does anyone else. The factory PS with the correct spring always gave me an acceptable feel of the road and I have driven them both ways. With the spring now available not so much.
Yeah, I've known there is a different spring for decades. I should have said, "the power steering design is the same except for the spring in the control valve. Meaning both used a hydraulic ram on the drag link actuated by a control valve hooked to the pitman arm.

I've driven a Corvette with that PS and I've driven a Chevy II with that PS, both having the correct spring in the control valve. Neither one had road feel to suit me. And they didn't suit many magazine road testers of the era either. Your threshold of acceptance could be lower than average..
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Old 07-01-2019, 07:10 PM
  #51  
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Originally Posted by jsans View Post
Have you tried a few extra pounds of air pressure in the tires?
you should try this first. I've noticed it makes a difference on my '64. Not a lot over, but a couple of pounds should help.
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Old 07-01-2019, 10:26 PM
  #52  
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Originally Posted by MikeM View Post
Yeah, I've known there is a different spring for decades. I should have said, "the power steering design is the same except for the spring in the control valve. Meaning both used a hydraulic ram on the drag link actuated by a control valve hooked to the pitman arm.

I've driven a Corvette with that PS and I've driven a Chevy II with that PS, both having the correct spring in the control valve. Neither one had road feel to suit me. And they didn't suit many magazine road testers of the era either. Your threshold of acceptance could be lower than average..


Yes, that may be. However when I was in the car business from 1968-1974 I drove nearly EVERY car manufactured by the 4 US makers and they all steered differently. Mopars had the least feel of the road of all and you could steer one from lock to lock with one finger. Other 63-67 GM cars did not give you the same feel for the road as the C2 Corvettes. I owned and drove C2s consistently from 1976-2007 and had one that I replace the control valve/ram before I knew of the spring difference and did notice the difference in them from the originals but didn't know why.
I recommend that anyone replacing their original units that you pull the original spring for use in you NEW replacement.
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Old 07-02-2019, 07:54 AM
  #53  
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Originally Posted by 68hemi View Post

Other 63-67 GM cars did not give you the same feel for the road as the C2 Corvettes..
Other '63-'67 GM cars used a variety of different steering systems than Chevrolet. All the Chevelles used integral PS gearboxes. I think pickup trucks as well? Chevy II, Corvette, impala (up though 1964). Later Impalas went to integral gearbox.

No surprise they all steered differently.

Higher end GM cars got the integral PS systems back in to the early '50's. Chevy got the cheap stuff.
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Old 07-02-2019, 08:44 AM
  #54  
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IIRC the Pontiac and Buick "land yachts" steered like tugboats while floating down the highway....but its been many years since I've driven one...
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Old 07-02-2019, 08:52 AM
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I had a new LTD built in 1978. I didn't like the feel of the standard Ford PS so I had a gearbox built up at engineering that had F 150 guts in it. Put it on the car as it went down the line. Steered great. Much better feel
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Old 07-02-2019, 07:43 PM
  #56  
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Does your C2 take a lot of effort to turn steering wheel?????



NOPE!

1963-1966 Corvette Steeroids Power Rack & Pinion Conversion Kit Small Block



















Last edited by CorvetteMikeB; 07-02-2019 at 07:46 PM.
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Old 07-12-2019, 01:54 PM
  #57  
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Originally Posted by davekp78 View Post
The shims are for increasing the caster, not camber.
Anyone have a diagram they can share showing where shims need to be on C1 front suspension ? Also the desirable amount of caster for C1's ?

Thanks-
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Old 07-13-2019, 05:32 PM
  #58  
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Found my problem. I checked every moving part and all checked out fine until I got to the idler arm. It was very stiff and hard to rotate. Put on a new one and it made enough difference that I'm no longer thinking about installing power steering. Not saying the steering is a breeze but good enough. It makes sense that the idler arm could go bad after 50 years with no way to grease it and being next to a hot exhaust.
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Old 07-13-2019, 06:28 PM
  #59  
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Ball bearing idler arms are available for some cars. Don't know about C2's. Might be worth checking in to..
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Old 07-13-2019, 08:20 PM
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Originally Posted by MikeM View Post
Ball bearing idler arms are available for some cars. Don't know about C2's. Might be worth checking in to..
I didn't know these were still available! I put one on my '57 Chebby 50+ years ago. I think I got it from J. C. Whitney.
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