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Restoring parts....some help

Old 01-09-2019, 12:39 AM
  #21  
7T1vette
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ALL bare metal needs to be cleaned and plated/coated/painted before being reinstalled. That is the only way to keep your work from falling prey to the 'rust devils' again. Now, if you have an air-conditioned, enclosed car hauler and never drive it on the road, you might get away with bare metal parts.
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Old 01-09-2019, 12:50 AM
  #22  
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Check out rust prevention magic or RPM. I did my rear over 5 years ago and still looks new and very much like an original casting. I NEVER drive mine when it is wet out but my garage is not climate controlled either.

I use RPM on all the metal and cast steel parts that are not painted. If you are not worried about originality cast blast paint works well.

Kind Regards,


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Old 01-09-2019, 08:48 AM
  #23  
~Stingray
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I will read more on the RPM and may give it a try on a few things. But there other things i definitely want to paint. What do i need to buy for that? Is there a certain type of primer and paint? Do I need to prime it?
Rust oleum has a lot of spray products that I have seen.

Last edited by ~Stingray; 01-09-2019 at 08:48 AM.
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Old 01-09-2019, 08:58 AM
  #24  
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Originally Posted by Bikespace View Post
I sent mine to Bairs. They did a great job, including blasting, relocating the parking brake bracket, and powder coating, It was NOT cheap, but much of that was for things I'd have had to fix anyway (both caliper mounts, strut/shock bolts). Were I to do it over, I'd insist on doing the rotor runout myself, rather than rivet on the rotors.

Mobird has a thread on the budget DIY route, which is worth looking up.
He has a write-up for which part: doing the runout or the rebuilding?
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Old 01-09-2019, 08:59 AM
  #25  
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If you have a yard you can always rent a large compressor/sandblaser setup and go to town for an afternoon. Youll want to get paint on it quick.
A good rattle can job is just fine and will hold up for many years even if you drive it.
Harware? Went to Osh years ago and bought hundreds of bolts/nuts/washers grade 8 wiht that goldish plating. Was under 200 but everything is brand spankin new underneath and looks excellent against new paint.
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Old 01-09-2019, 11:54 AM
  #26  
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Originally Posted by cuisinartvette View Post
If you have a yard you can always rent a large compressor/sandblaser setup and go to town for an afternoon. Youll want to get paint on it quick.
A good rattle can job is just fine and will hold up for many years even if you drive it.
Harware? Went to Osh years ago and bought hundreds of bolts/nuts/washers grade 8 wiht that goldish plating. Was under 200 but everything is brand spankin new underneath and looks excellent against new paint.
Is OHS an event?
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Old 01-09-2019, 07:19 PM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by ~Stingray View Post
He has a write-up for which part: doing the runout or the rebuilding?
The rebuilding of the trailing arms. Starting at post 84 here:
https://www.corvetteforum.com/forums...-thread-5.html

To answer your other question, while my trailing arms were out, I took the opportunity to grind everything I could with a wire wheel on a drill (or a wire cup), then brush on Ospho to convert what rust was left, cleaned with alcohol, then put on a coat of POR-15. That was the correct answer for this particular car. If I knew I was going to do a body-off restoration someday that retained the frame, I would NOT have used POR-15, as it makes blasting the frame much more difficult.
Images here (post 65), with the POR-15ed frame and powdercoated trailing arms:
https://www.corvetteforum.com/forums...0-build-4.html

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Old 01-11-2019, 12:44 PM
  #28  
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I believe powdercoating requires heating so unless you are doing small parts in an oven, you wont' be able to do the leaf springs.

What is the best type of paint of this and do I have to prime first? I hear of POR15 a lot, but wanted to know my other options.

I don't have to restore to the exact original color, I just want it to last. If I have to repaint stuff every other year, its not worth it.
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Old 01-11-2019, 07:21 PM
  #29  
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Regardless of whatever it is you are painting. Fiberglass, steel, copper, aluminum, stainless steel, chrome, etc. Getting the surface to the level of prep that will allow any liquid prep agent, conversion coating, etch primers, epoxy primers or whatever to do their job and link up to the substrate....so your initial bond to that substrate is good. it does not make a difference in what you put on it after that. Because if the first coating does not work...then all that is applied on it will more then likely fail in time....due to that initial coating can flake or peel off.

Now for those who do not want to keep dealing with touching up things and having to do it in every few years or so. The the choice of what you use and the PREP is important. Because...lets face it.... If you do not take care of your paint on your car it can fail...even though it was applied with the correct products.

I know on springs... I prefer to use an enamel based paint.

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Old 01-13-2019, 05:30 AM
  #30  
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When I started restoring my 69 I used the wire wheel method to clean things and eye protection as well as a suit of armor was needed. Boy those little wire devils fly off and kinds hurt when they get stuck in you. Very time consuming but I felt I had a lot of control on my cleaning. Have since up graded to a used blast cabinet and man a big difference and quick.






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Old 01-13-2019, 05:36 PM
  #31  
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seeing the posts about sacrificial chemicals that have to be renewed and maybe wont work...

just clearcoat the stuff... it's paint and you don't have to get glossy to have stock look... but why in the world you'd leave it bare is beyond me unless you just enjoy pulling it all back apart every month and re-cleaning it

Remove heavy grease first. (if there is any)
Get a large Rubbermaid tote that is sealed on the bottom, they sell them at Walmart.
Fill it with 20 gallons of white vinegar from your local grocery store for .99/gallon and let the parts soak in there for 2-4 days depending on rust level of severity. Take said parts out, rinse them off using a soft brittle brush to remove the oxide layer in water and dry off.
Leave in the sun or how ever you want to dry them off, then paint them with clear coat immediately. Just don't leave them alone for more than 30 mins in high humidity or they WILL flash rust.
You wont need to do any priming or cleaning after washing them off, the vinegar takes care of everything.

Last edited by naramlee; 01-13-2019 at 05:42 PM.
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Old 01-13-2019, 06:20 PM
  #32  
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Like general ike said and showed, safety first. goggles always. I kinda dig the rustoleum hammerite, Wire brush and/or wheel to get the big heavy stuff. Then a couple coats of hammerite. I know the black isn't really black, more of a dark charcoal almost. Obviously the hammerite doesn't prevent new rust, but it slows it. Removing all rust off every component is not my idea of a good time. It's under the car and barely seen anyway.
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