C4 General Discussion General C4 Corvette Discussion not covered in Tech

How many C4's are still on the road?

 
Old 12-25-2018, 09:33 AM
  #41  
radar502
CF Senior Member
 
radar502's Avatar
 
Member Since: Dec 2009
Location: Houston TX
Posts: 2,994
Liked 110 Times in 96 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Black03vert View Post
There are so many C4s for sale but rarely see them selling. My local dealer has 2 on their lot for over a year now and are priced reasonably.
One would think with sooo many C-4s on the road the parts would be easy to come by . I have for some reason restored another C-4 and found out parts are not ( well some ) parts easy to find .. I was thinking I could sell this super nice C-4 ( new all over ) not keeping up with the market my bad . I can't give it away .. But one thing I can do is drive it and have one hell of a good time .. I have seen people walk away from there $100.000 + Z and come over and check out my old C-4 like it was a UFO are something ,I don't get it but its cool I guess.. Not over powered and for sure not over priced I can have some fun in this one ..
radar502 is offline  
Old 12-25-2018, 10:28 AM
  #42  
JTSK
CF Member
 
JTSK's Avatar
 
Member Since: Mar 2018
Posts: 52
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Default

I know, I got my 85 nearly a year ago and before then, I really never noticed them, but now I take notice. My neighbor got a 91 about 3 months ago, and since then I've found 2 more in my neighborhood within 1/2 mile, so maybe there are more out there than we think? I am just happy to see them out and about. I will say that most I see are 91 and up judging from the tail lights.
JTSK is offline  
Old 12-25-2018, 10:45 AM
  #43  
radar502
CF Senior Member
 
radar502's Avatar
 
Member Since: Dec 2009
Location: Houston TX
Posts: 2,994
Liked 110 Times in 96 Posts
Default

Corvette fun comes in many ways a super nice C-4 is one . Now this looks the part . Nice ride ..
radar502 is offline  
Old 12-26-2018, 11:29 AM
  #44  
ErrrrCar205
CF Member
 
ErrrrCar205's Avatar
 
Member Since: Oct 2018
Location: Guilford, CT
Posts: 52
Liked 9 Times in 7 Posts
Default

Everybody's guess is probably affected by geography. I grew up in East Bum[censored], Maine, and I can tell you that there were and are precisely zero up there. Not particularly surprising. 4th gen Mustangs were the toy car of choice and there were a fair number of them. But Corvettes were mythical creatures which probably helps explain my C4 passion...and I was dumbfounded when I learned that they'd actually been made in the hundreds of thousands.

I then lived around Boston for about 10 years, and still saw Corvettes infrequently - and never a C4 that I can recall. Porsches and 'sporty' Audis all over the place until the Tesla Takeover. Not that those are 'vette competitors, exactly, but there's more Model Ss up there than you can shake a stick at.

We moved to CT recently and I've found C4s to be readily available, if not plentiful. Most of the ones I've seen in my neck of the woods are in decent shape, though, with some....ahem....well-loved examples out in the boonies. When I was comparison shopping before I bought mine, it seemed like the market was busier down in NY, NJ, and PA. So I could guess about as well I do at one of those "how many jelly beans are in this jar?" contests.

Still, I'd lean to the side of more survivors than fewer. I bought a nice one (albeit with a lotta miles) for under 8K, so even with the horribly underrated looks they can't be that rare. I like the 30% gone outright, 20% parts cars guesstimate...maybe with another category of 10% languishing in garages that aren't driveable now, but could be with a reasonable amount of TLC. That would leave ~140,000 that are somewhere on the spectrum of beater/nice daily driver/seasonal joy rider/driveable time capsule.

Coulda been a shorter post if I'd just said "lots", I guess.
ErrrrCar205 is offline  
Old 12-26-2018, 05:03 PM
  #45  
C4-90-41001
CF Senior Member
Support Corvetteforum!
 
C4-90-41001's Avatar
 
Member Since: May 2009
Location: Alexandria Kentucky
Posts: 118
Likes: 0
Liked 13 Times in 6 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Yukon Corleone View Post
I have owned my 1990 since new and mickey5 has owned his 1990 since new also as have a few others that post here too. A neighbor of mine bought a new 1990 after seeing my car and he still has his 1990 too but it doesn’t run and gathers dust in his garage.

do we know for sure how many were built?




Here is the history section from my book: "C4 Corvette Buyer's Guide" - available on Amazon.com. This section of the book answers the above question plus a few other questions that periodically come up.

1984: 51,547 Built

The 205 horsepower engine used in the first C4 was a holdover from the C3 generation. Called “Cross Fire Injection”, it was really more of a carburetor system than fuel injection and was only used the first model year. It wasn’t a bad engine though, cranking out 0-60 times of 6.7 seconds when coupled with the 4 speed manual transmission.

The cars equipped with the Z51 handling option were routinely turning in an astonishing 0.95g lateral acceleration on the skid pad. Even the base suspension provided 0.90g on the pad and initial acceptance was strong with half of the orders specifying the Z51 package.

The problem with all this was 80% of the people who bought the performance package thought the ride was far too stiff and wished they had bought the base handling package instead––a fact that Chevy took note of and reacted to with the 1985 model.

Still, with Foreigner’s “I want to know what love is” pouring out of the spectacular Bose sound system, the C4’s launch was made in grand style with even the European motoring press looking at it straight on instead of down their noses.

Now, several decades later, the 1984 C4 represents the least expensive way to become the owner of a Corvette. With so many manufactured, relatively decent cars can be found for under $5,000. And although they will most likely never be collector’s cars, they wear the Corvette name badge and for that reason alone are worth considering if you’re on a budget.

1985: 39,727 Built

There were two major changes in 1985. First, Chevy toned the ride harshness way down, ending up with a Z51 package that was much less harsh than even the 1984 base package. The effect on the all-important skid pad was measurable but not a source for concern. With the base package coming in at .88g and the Z51 package generating .90g, the performance still was far better than anything offered by non-exotic motorcars. The complaints about ride quality disappeared from the press and more importantly from Chevy’s surveys much to GM’s relief.

The second major change was the move to a true fuel injection system. Called “Tuned Port Injection” (TPI), the most noticeable result was a 25 horsepower increase from 205 to 230 (SAE net) and a seat-of-the-pants gain in torque from 290 ft-lbs @ 2,800 RPM to 330 ft-lbs at a slightly higher 3200 RPM.

These changes could be measured as well as felt with the 1985 Corvette galloping from 0-60 in 5.7 seconds, a full second faster than its older sibling. Yet the same car was exceeding 150 MPH in an all-out speed dash! Pretty amazing stuff since it turned in both those numbers without any changes to the drive train, suspension or aerodynamics.

1986: 35,109 Built

The Indianapolis 500 featured the Corvette as the pace car in 1986 and Chevy used the “Greatest Spectacle in Racing” to introduce the first Corvette convertible since the 1975 C3 model. Of the total 35,109 1986 Corvettes built, 7,315 were convertibles.

For the extra money, the new owners got a stiffened uni-frame with an integral “X” cross member.
Top down excitement was back and a new, tighter, better-built Corvette convertible was providing wind-in-the-hair experiences for another generation of enthusiasts.

In addition to the return of the roadster, the 1986 model added Bosch ABS II anti-skid brakes yielding a significant safety improvement.

When the plant started making the convertible, both models had changes made to the L98 engine. The cast iron heads were replaced with aluminum versions resulting in 5 more horsepower (235 SAE) although the torque numbers stayed the same. Prior to that mid-year change, the horsepower was the same as the 1985 model.

1987: 30,632 Built

In 1987, roller lifters were added to the L98 engine and another suspension option––The Z52 Sports Handling Package––was added making the 1987 an improved Corvette yet again.

The brochure that year provided an excellent primer on what it took to create and then improve the C4, detailing the suspension changes available in the Z52 RPO and also, explaining how Chevy tuned the L98 engine initially and then improved it. With the addition of the low friction, roller valve lifters, the power went up again, this time to 240 horsepower but the torque jumped all the way to 345 ft-lb.

0-60 acceleration was pegged at 5.6 seconds and the skid pad numbers came in at .91g. Readers looking for a bargain C4 would do well to consider the 1987 due to the improvements.

1988: 22,789 Built

1988 was the year for front suspension improvements and robust brakes. Taking an already great suspension, engineers re-designed the front portion to achieve zero scrub radius and reduced the “fight” that was present in the earlier models from brake torque and road induced steering inputs.

Drivers comparing the 1987 to the 1988 would notice how the latter car stayed pointed straight ahead in spite of uneven road surfaces and the occasional pothole plus there was less effort required to point it in any direction.

As for the brakes, 1988 saw the addition of dual piston front brakes and a newly designed emergency brake that used the existing brake pads instead of the separate drum arrangement present on the earlier C4 models.

Changes like these were the direct result of racetrack experience. Racing against the likes of Porsche 944 turbos, Corvettes won every SCCA (Sports Car Club of America) Pro Showroom Stock Series race from 1985 through 1987. They were so dominant that a separate series, (the Corvette Challenge) was the only game in town in 1988 and 1989.

It seems that the vaunted European motorcars could handle a short race but when the duration went over a few hours, one by one they failed leaving only the Corvette to finish––still running strong.

1988 also saw the start of a unique customer support innovation called the Corvette Action Team. Team members Gordon Killebrew, Jerry Watts, Sonny Kilgo, Danny Hawkins and Harold White provided technical information directly to the customers. Ed O’Keefe ran the show and until 1996, 200 people a day called the 800 number with questions and got answers from people in Bowling Green who knew the car inside out.

1989: 26,412 Built

Horsepower went up another 5 in 1989 to 245 SAE net, compliments of a less restrictive exhaust system.

Because the resulting exhaust note was slightly harsher, GM opted to not put the exhaust on the convertible. And on the coupe, it was only available if you also purchased the 3.07 axle ratio. 17-inch tires were standard for all models. The new wheel design is considered by many to be the best ever offered on the C4.

1989 also saw the introduction of a new, 6 speed transmission. Before 1989, the only manual transmission was the much-maligned Doug Nash 4+3 gearbox. The thing is the 4+3 is not a bad trans-mission for street use. Racing? Not so much.

Like the automatic transmission, it had been subjected to unnerving spike tests where the engine was wound up tight and the power dumped all at once to try and make the gearbox fail. The part that failed was examined and improvements made to avoid that particular failure mode.

At the track though, the 4+3 boxes were prone to blow up in spite of spike tests and that was considered bad form for a performance automobile.

The racing problems might have been enough to drive Chevy to drop the new German ZF six speed transmissions in the 1989 model but the real reason was something called the ZR-1 that was supposed to make its appearance that year.

Although public availability was delayed until 1990, small quantities of ZR-1s were constructed in 1989. Used as development vehicles, these rare automobiles found their way into the hands of the automotive press and even did a tour of Europe shortly before the introduction of the 1990 model year.

1989 was the last year for the hated “arcade” dashboard. Many however did not hate the dash and considered the replacement to be far worse. But by the end of the ‘80s, its time was past though and with the new decade, many changes were in store for the C4.

1990: 20,597 Built (L98), 3049 (ZR-1), Total 23,646

A further refinement to the venerable L98 found still another 5 hid-den horsepower yielding a SAE net of 250 with the same 345 ft-lb of torque generated by the 1988-1989 versions.

The long anticipated interior redesign also occurred that year but the reviews were not quite what Chevy had hoped.

A sweeping cockpit divider separated the passenger from the driver and added a claustrophobic aspect to the car plus the mixed grouping of analog and digital gauges offered the best–or worst–of both worlds. Ironically, the 2014 C7 interior bears a passing resemblance to the 1990 C4 interior (although GM denies any intent to design a retro look into the C7).

But tunes came rolling out of a new GM-Bose radio, an improved version of the original breathtaking system, and those songs included Sinead O’Connor’s 1990 hit “Nothing compares 2-U”, a fitting theme song for the main event of the automotive year: the introduction of the wondrous ZR-1.

The ZR-1’s Conception

It would be neat if the story of the ZR-1 began along the lines of: “GM master strategist Joe Gofast had a vision for an all-new, giant killer of a sports car and…”. A nice story but that isn’t the way it happened.

In 1985, Chevy management contacted Lotus managing director Tony Rudd and asked for a little advice on a small project. GM didn’t own Lotus in those days but the General’s engineering group was impressed with the UK Company and wanted to embark on a joint project to design a new set of cylinder heads for their franchise player, the small block 350 CID engine.

Rudd “did his sums” and told GM that an entirely different approach was needed––a new motor––and offered to design one if they liked. So, a better performing cylinder head project turned into a full-on engine project that eventually led to a 32 valve, 405 horsepower screamer. And that engine powered the famous ZR-1 Corvette.

GM and Lotus worked closely on the development of what would become the LT-5 engine and although it was a 350 CID engine with the same 90 degree, 4.4 bore of the standard L98, nothing else was the same.

The engine was mostly aluminum, even the block, with 4 overhead cams and 32 valves. It was a racing engine but extremely well mannered.

Below 3,000 RPM, it ran on half of the available cylinder ports and just sailed along, producing 250 horsepower and sipping fuel–Clark Kent in horn rims.

Put your foot in it though and all 32 valves came into play with a ferocity that can’t be described with words. Think telephone booths, a cape and set of tights with a big “S” on the chest. You could touch the floorboard with the accelerator pedal and 4.5 seconds later you were traveling 60 MPH.

In 1990 a ZR-1 ran for 24 hours straight, at an average speed of 175.843 MPH, establishing a new speed and endurance record under the watchful eye of the Federation Internationale de l’Automobile (FIA). The car required no maintenance during the period, an absolutely virtuoso performance not likely duplicated anytime soon.

GM hated the slogan “King of the Hill” though. They preferred “Snake Charmer”, a put-down reference to Chrysler Corporation’s all out race car. But King of the Hill describes the car better than any advertising hype dreamed up by GM and it stuck.

It enjoyed a 6-year run from 1990 through 1995 with production dwindling to 448 built each of the last three years it was made.

Both a docile pet and a fierce protector of its owner’s ego, we may not see its likes again – as much because of its break-through design as its actual performance.


1991: 18,595 Built (L98), 2,044 (ZR-1), Total 20,639

For 1991, the emphasis was on the exterior appearance. Gone was the black trim strip along the area where the body-bonding seam would have been, replaced by color matched, flush trim. Gone also were the round taillights, overtaken by square lights for the base model––albeit rounded a bit at the corners, ala ZR-1. The vertical fender gills became horizontal fender gills, their number increased from 2 to 4 and a new wheel design made its appearance.

A redesigned front fascia completed the makeover with wraparound cornering and parking lights. The result was a more rounded look to the body––just the slightest view ahead to the C5.

In 1991, the Z-51 suspension package disappeared from the option list, replaced by option Z-07. The Z-07 package was an adjustable suspension using all heavy-duty parts and the settings went from harsh to incredibly harsh. It was definitely an enthusiast’s package.

Over in ZR-1 land, the days of speculators running the price up to over $100,000 were long gone. Production dropped to 2,044 units, an indication of the true marketplace for top of the line, high performance automobiles. Or, perhaps just an indication of how many people would pay an additional $31,683 to cut 1 second off their 0-60 time.

1991 did not see any massaging of the L98 engine. It remained at 250/345 in the horsepower/torque department. There was a good reason. After 7 years the L98 was about to slip into history.

1992: 19,955 Built (L98), 502 (ZR-1), Total 20,457

Chevy had included a cassette tape with each Corvette for many years. Actually there were two tapes, one explaining the features of the car and another with a sampler of up-tempo songs designed to enhance the free spirit appeal of the car. But in 1992, Chevy really got into it.

CD players were now available in the optional radio package and owners found a CD entitled ‘Songs of the Sea” in the center divider when they took delivery.

They popped the CD in the slot and “Surfin’ Safari”, “Sea Cruise” or “Sea of Love” sprang from the Bose speakers. If their musical tastes ran to the classics, they could punch the next button and listen to “Water Music” or “La Mer”.

The reason for this emphasis on the sea was GM’s decision to sponsor the America3 racing yacht in the America’s Cup race. Corvette devoted 10 pages in the ’92 dealer brochure to the tie in between two speedsters including a suitable-for-framing picture of America3 under full sail––a sail with the Corvette name and logo prominently displayed. Otherwise, one milestone and two major changes occurred in 1992.

The milestone came when the 1,000,000th Corvette rolled off the Bowling Green assembly line. Eventually the car found its way to the Corvette Museum––a monument to a 39-year American love affair with an automobile.

The changes involved the suspension and the base engine. One went well, the other didn’t.

Automatic Slip Regulation (ASR) was another Bosch invention, (Bosch made the ABS-II anti-lock brakes as well), and it was designed to keep the rear end from catching the front end during aggressive driving episodes. Basically, the device had sensors that picked up on an impending loss of directional stability.

When its computer determined a problem was about to occur, commands were issued to retard the spark, relax the throttle and brake as required using the capabilities of the ABS-II system.

ASR was not an option but rather a standard feature, just like ABS, although an off switch was provided for those drivers who were scandalized at the prospect of having racing decisions made by a few pieces of silicon.

In the engine department, Chevy engineers reworked the 350 CID block and found several ponies wandering around. Enough horses were corralled to total 300 at 5,000 RPM.
The downside was that the torque dropped to 330 ft-lbs (from 345) as a result of induction runner redesigns and the torque peak occurred at 4,000 RPM instead of 3,200 RPM as was the case with the L98.

Be that as it may, the problem with the new LT1 wasn’t the loss of 15 ft-lbs of torque. The real problem was one group of Chevy engineers didn’t talk to another group and the result was a problem child called the “Opti-Spark” distributor.

Aside from the name––it sounded as if it belonged in a Woody Allen movie––the new distributor had a habit of getting wet and suffering a lingering death.

The basic idea was a good one: a rotating disk interrupted a light beam to precisely control the firing of the spark plugs.
Unfortunately, the device was mounted on the front of the engine where it could attract and hold moisture. Originally, the engineers had provided a small hole for the moisture to escape. But another group of engineers thought the hole could ingest water from the pavement due to its location so they took steps to eliminate that peril.

Result: condensation moisture in the distributor and a car that would not run or, if it did run, it backfired incessantly.

Chevy recalled every 1992 Corvette and put things back the way they were supposed to be but the problem with condensation persisted until engineers added a vacuum system to constantly pull moisture from the device a few years later. Still, with the creation of the new engine, top speed did go up and 0-60 time did come down: a reason to again question why you would pay an extra $31,683 for a ZR-1.

1993: 21,142 Built (LT1), 448 (ZR-1), Total 21,590

With the exception of 1963, Chevrolet has never celebrated a Corvette anniversary decade properly. In 1963, the ground-breaking Stingray was introduced and many enthusiasts feel it was the high water mark for Corvette innovation. From that first 10th anniversary, things have gone downhill celebration-wise.

In 1973, Chevy changed the hood, put in some additional sound-proofing and that was pretty much it. 1983 was a debacle: not only was there no new model or special edition Corvette, there was no 1983 Corvette at all; a Chevy mistake that many enthusiasts have still not forgiven.

The C5 was supposed to be introduced in 1993 but slipped to 1997; the C6 introduction slipped to 2004 and the C7 appeared in 2014, not 2013. Anniversaries are not a Corvette strong point.

With the C5 slippage, Chevy decided to doll up the 1993 C4 and call it the anniversary edition.

For $1,455.00, the buyer got a Ruby Red metallic exterior; Ruby Red leather sports seats with a special 40th anniversary logo on the headrests, power driver seat, special wheel trim and equally special body emblems. 6,749 versions of the anniversary edition were sold so it is somewhat unique but not rare.

The LT1’s torque was increased to 340 ft-lbs but otherwise there was little difference between the base 1992 and base 1993 models. And ZR-1 sales dropped to 448 where they would remain until 1995, the last year for the option.

1994: 22,882 Built (LT1), 448 (ZR-1), Total 23,330

For 1994, Chevy opened the cockpit up again, eliminating the driver/passenger divider trim piece that some thought contributed to a feeling of claustrophobia. The bad news was the disappearance of the glove box, replaced by a passenger side air bag. This wonderful device exploded towards the passenger’s face at 200 mph, rendering them temporarily deaf and possibly sightless. Once in a while it saved the life of those too stupid to fasten their seat belts.

The engine and automatic transmission gained a new computer controller in 1994 but the LT1 engine remained unchanged, as did the suspension. Extended mobility tires (EMT) were introduced allowing the driver to continue on up to 200 miles with a flat tire, an innovation that would result in the total elimination of the spare tire when the C5 was introduced in 1997.

448 ZR-1 automobiles were constructed and Chevrolet finally called it the “King of the Hill” in the ’94 dealer brochure; something that probably made management physically ill given how they felt about the slogan.

1995: 20,294 Built (LT1), 448 (ZR-1), Total 20,742

Someone in Chevy marketing loves Yellow Corvettes. When the unsuspecting Corvette prospect pulled the 1995 dealer’s brochure out of its black envelope, they probably reached for their sunglasses and a tube of number 2,000,000 sun block. The brochure’s bright yellow cover certainly got your attention.

Once opened, the brochure proclaimed what everyone knew: The ZR-1 was history after one last hurrah. A last year of production, 448 cars, and C4 RPO ZR-1 achieved a status unique in automotive history. Never before had there been an automobile with so much power, such wonderful handling and yet so docile a demeanor in everyday driving activities.

It was quite a run. 6,939 production ZR-1s built plus another 100 or so prototypes and nearly 90 1989 models that fit somewhere between the prototypes and the regular production offerings.

Still, live by technology, die by technology. The plain fact was the LT1 was almost as powerful without a price tag that doubled the cost of the car. Excellence has its place but the marketplace is driven by ‘good enough’ so the time had come for the ZR-1 to pass from the scene. The king was dead. Long live the king.

The 1995 Corvette offered two interior options: basic and sports package. Basic was basic, pretty much the same as the 1994 car but the sports version was in some respects a look ahead to the Z-06 option on the C5. Two tone, aggressive, and not for the faint hearted, it captured your attention. You either loved or hated the design and enough people loved it that it remained on the option list for the 1996 model as well.

The ABS brakes got an upgrade in 1995 to the Bosch series V version. Stops with 1.0g deceleration were possible and great braking became superb. Otherwise, 1995 was the year to catch one’s breath. A pause before the last of the C4 breed made its appearance and a time to reflect on where the Corvette had been and where it was going.

1996: 20,536 Built (LT1), 1000 (Grand Sport), Total 21,536

Do yourself a favor. Beg, borrow or buy a 1996 dealer brochure and turn to page 12. Fold it out and there is the very best Corvette image ever created. A Sebring Silver C4 convertible is shown posed on what appears to be a wet road but then you notice that the reflection looks strange and suddenly it dawns on you that the reflection is the legendary 1959 Sting Ray racer.

Stunningly beautiful, it’s a wonderful picture of two classic cars rendered with uncommon grace, a fitting way for the C4 to end its days in the sun.

Chevy built 5,412 Sebring Silver collector’s edition Corvettes in 1996. They were coupes and convertibles, equipped in many different ways but the color, badging and seat headrests proclaimed them to be the last of the C4 model and therefore a collector car.

Not content to just spray silver paint on a few thousand cars, Chevy also offered a special engine for the ’96 Corvette. Called the LT4, it was available only in 1996 offering 330 horsepower and 340 ft-lbs of torque. Costing $1450, it was an option that many people wanted and was standard equipment on the 1000 Grand Sport models that became the real collector’s edition 1996 C4 motorcar.

With its distinctive dark blue color, white longitudinal stripes and red fender slashes, the Grand Sport is much desired by those who buy cars and wait for the appreciation to set in.
Regardless, a Grand Sport is beautiful to drive or sit and admire – a fitting memorial to the C4 Corvette, the model that became America’s Sports Car.

Last edited by C4-90-41001; 12-26-2018 at 06:14 PM.
C4-90-41001 is offline  
Old 12-26-2018, 09:33 PM
  #46  
slammin
CF Senior Member
 
Member Since: May 2018
Location: Fruita CO
Posts: 123
Liked 16 Times in 15 Posts
Default

The based on those numbers, the total C4 production is 358,156
slammin is offline  
Old 12-27-2018, 11:15 AM
  #47  
corvette_realtor
CF Senior Member
 
corvette_realtor's Avatar
 
Member Since: Sep 2016
Location: Indianapolis
Posts: 153
Liked 10 Times in 9 Posts
Default

Plenty to choose from for sale around me (midwest) but almost never see any on the road. See lots of C5s and C6s on the road here.
corvette_realtor is offline  
Old 12-29-2018, 09:57 AM
  #48  
MatsA
CF Member
 
Member Since: Jun 2016
Location: Uppsala Uppland Sweden EC
Posts: 74
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Default

Club Corvette Sweden in 2013 had 569 C4 and from then to 2017 the number was in decline so in 2017 there was 477 C4.
The number of C1,C2,C3 is steady, C5 is a slight decline, C6 and C7 are rising, total number off Corvettes in the club at this moment is something like 2678 of all models.
To this we have to add all those who are not members......CCS is one of the largest clubs outside of the US.
MatsA is offline  
Old 12-29-2018, 09:40 PM
  #49  
Z51BOB
CF Senior Member
 
Z51BOB's Avatar
 
Member Since: Mar 2000
Location: Bradenton, FL
Posts: 682
Liked 7 Times in 7 Posts
Cruise-In II Veteran
Default

I have two & I’m planning to keep them
Z51BOB is offline  
Old 12-30-2018, 12:59 PM
  #50  
*89x2*
CF Senior Member
 
*89x2*'s Avatar
 
Member Since: May 2001
Location: ...tearing up the highways, one state at a time™®©
Posts: 15,927
Liked 39 Times in 23 Posts
Default

272,916 are still registered.
*89x2* is offline  
Old 12-31-2018, 01:20 AM
  #51  
Palanon
CF Member
 
Member Since: Sep 2017
Location: Strip Mall Hell Georgia via New Hampshire
Posts: 93
Liked 11 Times in 8 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by *89x2* View Post
272,916 are still registered.
there's a good starting point if that is the latest DMV numbers. Then, the unknown factor is how many are parked indefinitely. My 94 convertible 6speed had been of the road for probably 5 years. It needed the top replaced but was in amazing enough shape to change the oil, put in fuel and drive it over 3,000 miles home and on side trips without a hiccup. Like C3's, I think there are quite a few off the road for various reasons. The C4 is a complicated and parts heavy car. Bet there are thousands sitting that need minor to a decent amount of work. Most dealers won't work on C4's so, got a VATS or ABS problem it sits.
Palanon is offline  
Old 01-03-2019, 06:57 PM
  #52  
pologreen1
CF Senior Member
 
pologreen1's Avatar
 
Member Since: Dec 2007
Posts: 15,949
Liked 207 Times in 198 Posts
Default

So, by the numbers posted here of 358,000 made and now 272.916 registered and who knows how many are still out there. Buy em boys, your great great great grandchildren might find them to be "rare and valuable".... To think people actually equate value with these things at this point baffles me. Number and prices speak the truth. These were simply produced as a consumable for profit and never anything else.

Fun, apparently reliable, and cheap =People still want them.
pologreen1 is offline  
Old 01-04-2019, 08:43 AM
  #53  
radar502
CF Senior Member
 
radar502's Avatar
 
Member Since: Dec 2009
Location: Houston TX
Posts: 2,994
Liked 110 Times in 96 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by pologreen1 View Post
So, by the numbers posted here of 358,000 made and now 272.916 registered and who knows how many are still out there. Buy em boys, your great great great grandchildren might find them to be "rare and valuable".... To think people actually equate value with these things at this point baffles me. Number and prices speak the truth. These were simply produced as a consumable for profit and never anything else.

Fun, apparently reliable, and cheap =People still want them.
You sound like owing a C-4 is a bad thing or buying one is also a bad thing really not all of us can or want to buy a $60,000-$100,00 Corvette but I still like to have some Corvette fun . I own a 93 yep I invested around $20,000 in it OK cheap by todays standers I guess , value let me see I went a outing with 30 of my Corvette buds the other week and a few C-5s rest were 3-years old or newer were lots or $100,00 Zs I had as much fun as any of them 26 year old C-4 valuable ??? . I pulled up to the lot were we all met and all the people left there $100.000 Z and all started looking at my old show winning 93 and had as much fun on the run anybody did ,value can not always just be dollars sometimes it's the hell yes fun factor for dollar spent , booing a consumable product that's the American way what you un-American . Its not nice to bad mouth 272.916 C-4 Corvette openers..
radar502 is offline  
The following users liked this post: radar502
Yukon Corleone (01-04-2019)
Old 01-04-2019, 10:47 AM
  #54  
dkpnkc
CF Senior Member
 
Member Since: Oct 2017
Location: Kearney Missouri
Posts: 177
Liked 23 Times in 23 Posts
Default

Regarding the notes on the 93:

"The C5 was supposed to be introduced in 1993 but slipped to 1997; the C6 introduction slipped to 2004 and the C7 appeared in 2014, not 2013. Anniversaries are not a Corvette strong point."

C6 slipped to 2005, not 2004.

"For $1,455.00, the buyer got a Ruby Red metallic exterior; Ruby Red leather sports seats with a special 40th anniversary logo on the headrests, power driver seat, special wheel trim and equally special body emblems. 6,749 versions of the anniversary edition were sold so it is somewhat unique but not rare."

This is correct, but due to a mix up, all 1993's have the 40th logo on their headrests.


-------------------------------

I have a '93 and a '12. During this time of year in the midwest I rarely see any Corvette's out and about. C4's are pretty rare sights around my area, even on nice spring/summer/fall days.

Last edited by dkpnkc; 01-04-2019 at 10:49 AM.
dkpnkc is offline  
Old 01-04-2019, 08:51 PM
  #55  
*89x2*
CF Senior Member
 
*89x2*'s Avatar
 
Member Since: May 2001
Location: ...tearing up the highways, one state at a time™®©
Posts: 15,927
Liked 39 Times in 23 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by dkpnkc View Post
Regarding the notes on the 93:


This is correct, but due to a mix up, all 1993's have the 40th logo on their headrests.


-------------------------------
Except for the 1993 Cloth Seat Corvettes. No 40th headrest embroidery on the base seats in cloth




*89x2* is offline  
Old 01-06-2019, 11:39 PM
  #56  
LWesthaver
CF Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
LWesthaver's Avatar
 
Member Since: Dec 1999
Location: Columbia MD
Posts: 778
Liked 45 Times in 29 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by *89x2* View Post
272,916 are still registered.
Very interesting. Where did you find that number?

--Wes
LWesthaver is offline  
Old 01-07-2019, 03:24 AM
  #57  
CVG323
CF Senior Member
 
CVG323's Avatar
 
Member Since: May 2006
Location: 1000 Vin Scully Ave, L.A California
Posts: 11,581
Liked 61 Times in 47 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by *89x2* View Post
Except for the 1993 Cloth Seat Corvettes. No 40th headrest embroidery on the base seats in cloth


I like the cloth seats
CVG323 is offline  
Old 01-07-2019, 08:47 AM
  #58  
ghoastrider1
CF Senior Member
 
ghoastrider1's Avatar
 
Member Since: May 2006
Location: indy indiana
Posts: 7,243
Liked 182 Times in 164 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by corvette_realtor View Post
Plenty to choose from for sale around me (midwest) but almost never see any on the road. See lots of C5s and C6s on the road here.



I SAW A GREY one yesterday at Dan Jones and Rockville rds. ( 1/6/2019)
Of course it was a great day here in Avon ( Indy). BUT, was the first one I have seen since fall. At the drag races here I have seen only two c-4s. Mine and Jonnys. The other vetts are 5-5s 0r 6s and they are just watchingh.Yes I know, folks think an ocassional rag race is going to break everything in the car. Shrug, I have mine for fun and cruzing, and to race on a wensday evening. Your right tho, in the summer a c=4 is seen not often, but not rare. With my new paint job, I now have more invested in my 86 than the price I paid for it, I paid 3,5 and bought it as a driving project. Tranny repair, a D44 rar ed, new radiator, rebuilt dash and still needs more, Thats of for me, I love thatdarn thing. Now I gotta find the wheels I want and the outside will be done. I am now retired and cant wait for better weather.

Last edited by ghoastrider1; 01-07-2019 at 08:56 AM.
ghoastrider1 is offline  
Old 01-07-2019, 03:46 PM
  #59  
pologreen1
CF Senior Member
 
pologreen1's Avatar
 
Member Since: Dec 2007
Posts: 15,949
Liked 207 Times in 198 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by radar502 View Post
You sound like owing a C-4 is a bad thing or buying one is also a bad thing really not all of us can or want to buy a $60,000-$100,00 Corvette but I still like to have some Corvette fun . I own a 93 yep I invested around $20,000 in it OK cheap by todays standers I guess , value let me see I went a outing with 30 of my Corvette buds the other week and a few C-5s rest were 3-years old or newer were lots or $100,00 Zs I had as much fun as any of them 26 year old C-4 valuable ??? . I pulled up to the lot were we all met and all the people left there $100.000 Z and all started looking at my old show winning 93 and had as much fun on the run anybody did ,value can not always just be dollars sometimes it's the hell yes fun factor for dollar spent , booing a consumable product that's the American way what you un-American . Its not nice to bad mouth 272.916 C-4 Corvette openers..
I'm speaking towards all the people always talking about value of these cares. I'm in the same boat as you. I have even more "invested" / wasted in mine than you. If I hated the c4 I would just dump it or give it to family. It has it's own qualities newer ones did not offer me.
pologreen1 is offline  
Old 01-07-2019, 04:16 PM
  #60  
radar502
CF Senior Member
 
radar502's Avatar
 
Member Since: Dec 2009
Location: Houston TX
Posts: 2,994
Liked 110 Times in 96 Posts
Default

NO big deal this is what we do ( Old Roders ) anyway we spend way too much money on stuff not worth much . But can you put a price on having a good time and people coming around going wow what a rod . This is what we do one has to feel it do know the deal can't put a price one doing something one likes to do .. Its not about the money if I have to splain it you don't get it .. Go have fun stop thinking about the value .what value.. O-the fun value , priceless for some...
radar502 is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Quick Reply: How many C4's are still on the road?


Sponsored Ads
Vendor Directory

Contact Us - About Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

© 2019 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.
 
  • Ask a Question
    Get answers from community experts
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: