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Increadible "car guy" week in NH....

 
Old 07-02-2019, 07:04 PM
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Tom400CFI
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Default Increadible "car guy" week in NH....

I've written about these before....but here I am, with another story to share.

I grew up in New England, but moved out west (UT) in '97 and haven't looked back....too much. But as time passes there are things that I miss about New England; the lush greenery, the area is steeped in history -it's where our country started. I miss the ocean, and I miss some things from back there that are "authentic"; mom and pop restaurants and stores, for example. My wife grew up in Michigan and sometimes thinks that Michigan and New England are the same thing. They're not. She hasn't seen much of the mighty White Mountains, and a fantastic opportunity arose for us to visit that area. What she wanted was to see was New England sceneray. What I wanted was an "authentic"/classic New England experience. The trip we took couldn't have been more perfect.

The event that was the catalyst for our trip was the 2019 New England Brass and Gas tour. "Brass and Gas" refers to an era of cars; cars that basically have brass trim and gas lamps....cars from 1900 to 1915, I believe is the cut off date. Our family has two cars that fit this grouping; a 1910 Hudson Model 20 touring car...




...and a 1910 Hupmobile Model 20 roadster....




They're both kept in Maine under my Mother's care and she was already going on this tour with the Hudson. The Hupp has a 1.8L 4 cylinder and is a "flat head", although none of the cars of the era had removable cylinder heads. The head/cylinders were cast as a single component, most companies cast the cylinders in pairs, some as a "monoblock" (all 4 or 6 cylinders in one cylinder case) and a few cast each cylinder/head assy individually. Almost all cars of the time used side valve; aka "flat head" design. The crank case casting (no "oil pan") was almost always bolted to the cylinders -it wasn't part of the "block" and most often, the cylinder case/head was cast iron and the crank case was cast aluminum. And get this: The pistons of the era were all cast iron! Although there is hardly a car running w/iron pistons anymore.

Anyway, the Hupp has a cylinders cast in pairs and it's water cooled, 20 horse power. It has no water pump, oil pump, fuel pump, battery, generator, starter motor, belts or accessories. The coolant cycles via thermo siphon. Oil is splash lube and there isn't a seal in the engine. Valve lifters are totally exposed so it leaks. A lot; about a quart every 100 miles. To compensate for leakage, there is a reservoir on the side of the motor that you fill w/oil. Throttle linkage controls a sliding cam that opens needle valves and allows oil to gravity drip into the crank case...hopefully maintaining oil level! fuel is gravity feed to the very low mounted carb. There is nothing electrical on the car other than the ignition which is all in one unit; a high tension Bosch magneto. All lights are acetylene or kerosene. Car is started by hand crank and even at hand cranking speeds, the magneto throws a wicked spark. The cooling fan is cast into the front mounted flywheel. It's a model of simplicity. Compression ratio is about 5:1 and cam timing is less than 180* with less than 0* of overlap. Valve lift is about .250" or so. The carburetor was made before they understood the Bernoulli principle, as it relates to carbs, so it basically has a single fuel discharge point, in the main air inlet and that is massively choked down. You can adjust the fuel via a needle/screw. When idling the vacuum on that discharge point pulls the right amount of fuel for idle...but when you open the throttle, the vacuum at the discharge nozzle increases dramatically and would flood out the engine...except that there is also a spring controlled air valve that behaves basically like a metered vacuum leak. You adjust the spring to admit about the right amount of air to offset the over rich condition at open throttle and it works....fairly well. Unfortunately this design means that the carb is always a pretty significant restriction and limits power. It's neat/cool...but not ideal.

The car has a multi disk, wet clutch (like a modern motorcycle) -it's original to the car. It has a two speed trans and the ratios for first are similar to modern cars' first gear ratios...second gear ratio is the same as modern cars' 4th gear...so a huge "1-4" jump. Especially for a car that "red lines" at about 2500 RPM or so?

The car has rack and pinion steering with a very "sporty" 3/4 turn, lock to lock. The 'Vette is 2.5 turn for comparison (!). It has transverse rear leaf spring (like a 'Vette) semi trailing arms and a torque tube. Rear mechanical drum brakes only.

The Hudson is more advanced and features a much larger, 200 CID/3.3L, 25 hp engine, water pump, fan belt and cooling fan, and a battery (no generator though) that can run 4 ignition coils to help starting. It has dual ignition (bat/coils and a mag) and you typically run on the magneto. Three speed trans, torque tube and rear leaf springs. This car is very typical of the era. Two really neat features IMO:
The coils were "buzzer coils"; the "points" for each coil is a reed like metal leaf that vibrates (buzzes) when power is applied to it, by grounding battery power through a full contact distributor. Each movement of the reed functions the same as opening and closing points, so the coil is throwing a virtual continuous spark. What's cool about this is that if the engine is warm and cylinders filled w/a charge from shut down, you can get in the car flip the switch to "Batt" and the buzzer coil for which ever cylinder is near TDC will throw that continuous spark...the mixture will fire...and the car is running. No cranking, no starter. Just a quick "bzzz" and it's running.
The other cool feature is the clutch. The flywheel is massive; 80 lbs and it's cut out in the rear like a dish. The clutch is a cone clutch and there is no "pressure plate"; the clutch surface simply engages the cone/dish flywheel surface and you pull smoothly away. The Smooth part comes from the clutch material; leather! That's right; to maintain your clutch material, you treat it with leather conditioner/oil. In the pic above, you can see the massive FW hanging below/under where the dash board is.


The tour was based out of Whitefield NH (in the heart of the White Mountains) and did 70 - 100 mile day trips to local sites, museums, points-of-interest, etc. always returning to the same place in Whitefield. The "base camp" for the tour was one of New England's few remaining, old, "Grand" hotels; the Mountain View Grand. When I travel from UT to New England for these tours, I want an authentic "New England Experience"...and lodging is part of it. Our lodging delivered. The group did not, but WE also stayed for two of our nights at the near by, Omni Mount Washington Grand hotel, which was a realization of a childhood aspiration. Pics of these amazing places, coming....

We flew into Boston, borrowed a car from a friend, and headed to my Mom's house in Maine. She trailered the Hudson over to NH (about an 1:20 drive) and I fired up the Hupmobile and hit the road with our son.





UNFORTUNATELY, the "Hupp" didn't make it. We got to w/in about 20 minutes of the Mtn View Grand. I came down a big hill, made a left turn, accelerated up to cruising speed (about 35 mph)....and "knock-knock-knock-knock-knock-..." I shut it down and pulled to the side. NO, F'n way. The engine in the Hupp has been very reliable for nearly all of my 48 years, and even beyond that. My Dad rebuilt the engine in the 60's. It's always run great...but I've known (and told my Mom) for a while that the engine was "next" in the work needed on the car. Sunday, the 23rd, was that day. Here I am checking the oil right after the noise started. Checking the oil involves opening a drain petcock; if the oil is high enough, oil comes out. If oil doesn't come out...add some until it does. It was a tad low, but not enough to cause a problem. It was simply time. 50+ years of tours, meets, parades, trips to the ice cream place and getting picked up from school. Anyway, this was as far as the Hupp wanted to go...






We had some spare engine parts in my mom's barn. I wondered if I could pull some of the babbit bearings out of the spare, put them in this engine and get it through the week? I towed it back to her house w/her Duramax/trailer and tore it apart. The findings aligned with the noise:















Fortunately, the crank wasn't damaged, but it's time. The engine needs new pistons, rings, bore job, valves/seats, bearings....a complete rebuild. UNFORTUNATELY, the spare parts that we had included pistons (original cast iron!), and rods....but no bearings. I was dead in the water, as far as getting the Hupp back up and running for this tour. We headed back to the tour, w/o the Hupp. Saturday after the tour, I yanked the engine in my Mom's barn, and put it on a pallet so she can ship it to me here in UT.












So....that was it for the Hupp....it was out. We would have to ride with my Mom in the Hudson, or hitch rides with other folks...and that's what we did, which turned out great.



.

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Old 07-02-2019, 07:05 PM
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The place we stayed for the majority of the week, the Mtn View Grand...was fabulous. And IMO, an old New England Grand hotel, perfectly matches the old cars...and vice versa. Just have a look. The place...the cars parked in front, the gorgeous scenery in the back ground...it was fantastic.

















Looking back, as we STEAM away in a '10 Stanley Steamer one morning (hence the white "smoke")....





Since the Hupp was down, we rode in other folk's cars and one was this Stanley Steamer. What a freakin RIOT! It is a '10 touring car, 20 hp. The HP on a Steamer is calc'ed by the bore/stroke size and it's under rated by a lot compared to ICE's. A 20 hp Steamer performs similarly to a ~30hp ICE car.

I'd always thought that driving a Stanley would be fun/interesting...balancing boiler pressure with throttle/usage. But it's actually a lot of WORK. It's more like juggling 5 ***** at one time. The thing is always needing something; water, fuel jets cleaned, some pump adjustments, more water, add air to the pilot fuel tank, fill up with gas, add more water. It was crazy. We averaged:
*One stop every 5 miles to fix/add/adjust/diagnose.
*1 mpg, water consumption
*9 mpg gasoline consumption
*3 steam whistle blows, per day (awesome!)

Getting ready to head out in the AM, from the hotel...











Here we are, taking on more water. Tanks holds 35 gallons, so we'd stop about every 25 miles and "borrow" water from someone/someplace.






Here, we're stopped b/c the pilot wasn't burning right. You can see the orange flame in there...should be blue like a propane torch. The pilot ignites the main burner, and also vaporizes the gasoline before it exits the jets into the burner. The jets are at the ends of those "J tubes"....






Here we are, stopped again, this time cleaning out the Fuel Jets...



....back on the road again...




So the steam car is just a menagerie of problems...and solutions to those problems. There's valves to open and close, pumps to manage, pressure, fire(s), Juggling 5 *****. I should have taken a pic of the controls. Well...here is one from the net. Imagine controlling all this crap...while driving a 110 year old car down the road at the same time! No time to asnwer texts...that's for sure.







.

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Old 07-02-2019, 07:05 PM
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Wednesday, the tour took us for lunch at the old, Mt Washington Grand hotel -about 20 miles from where the tour was based at the Mtn View Grand. As a kid, I went on a tour just like this with my parents, that was based out of the Mt Washington, but we couldn't afford to stay there, then. We stayed at a local motel, then drove up to the Mt Washington every morning to join the tour. I decided to realize the desire to stay there this trip, so we "moved in" after lunch with the tour on Wednesday, and stayed until Friday. The place was amazing too. It reminded me of something like the "Titanic"...and a little bit of "The Shinning".





The mountain in the back ground is Mt Washington; the largest mountain in the northeast US, with over 4000' of prominence and a summit of 6288' elevation. Highest windspeed observed by man occurred on that summit; 238 mph. The cut-line going almost straight up, that looks like a ski trail, power lines, etc., that is the famous Cog Railway train (diesel or steam options) that takes tourists to the summit. The other side of the mountain, is graced with "Tuckerman Ravine" -a famous back country ski bowl for advanced skiing. Pics to come, of Tuckerman Ravine.













Here I am "smoking a cigar" while pose on my hearth leaning against my mantle. Ha ha ha...













And a little golf on the front 9, before dinner....






Come and play with us, Danny....for ever and ever and ever....


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Old 07-02-2019, 07:05 PM
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We wanted to get SOME exercise...Thursday's tour took us through Pinkham Notch which is a mtn pass on the east side of Mt Washington, and trail head for the Tuckerman Ravine trail. We drove "modern" that day and stopped at Pickham Notch ahead of most of the tour, then we hiked the ~3.5 Miles and about 2000' vert up to the bottom of Tuckerman Ravine. This place has a lot of memories for me; my grandfather hiked all over this mountain, skied it, and I started skiing Tuckerman ravine as a kid, when I was about 12 years old. It was a annual ritual to ski it every spring -April or May depending on the year/snow. Thanks to dense snow pack, Tuckerman has skiable pitches as steep as 55 degrees. Not percent...degrees. In fact, here is a pic of me, hiking it to ski it about 6 years ago when I happened to be back east in April, and said to a friend, "We're skiing Tuckerman!"....













And here, we're back to June, 2019 and the car tour at the trail head, Pinkham Notch, with a beautiful 1910, 7 passenger Rambler, 40 hp.







Here is the Tuckerman Trail, headed up...





Had to stop for a cool down, part way up the trail...
















A place of natural beauty and many great memories...





Pics continued in post #7....



.

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Old 07-03-2019, 04:51 AM
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Thanks for sharing.
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Old 07-03-2019, 03:16 PM
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Well that sucks. Travel for a vacation and end up doing lots of work.

Good luck with the rebuild!
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Old 07-03-2019, 05:59 PM
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I was pretty disappointed, that's for sure. 1/2 of me knew it was overdue....but the other 1/2, it's been SO reliable, for so, so long...I couldn't believe that it broke. Part of the sport.

Here is the last post...just pics of beautiful New England country and cool, old cars. Enjoy.....
















































One of the days took us through Franconia Notch and we stopped at CANNON Mountain, ski area. We rode the tram, which gave us some fantastic White Mountain views.








In this pic, notice in the foreground, a very typical, "New England" ski run; narrow. Twisty. Granite. Out west, we have big, wide open runs, and wide open bowls. Part of me misses the intimate feel of the classic New England ski experience.








Here is the late Robert Frost's (the famous poet) home, in Franconia NH. Look at that view. From this porch, looking out, this is what you could HEAR: Birds, a light breeze....how about that experience? Robert Frost had good taste for living location. You can just make out the ski runs on CANNON mountain past the trees on the right....












We'll finish off with a bad assed, 40 hp 1910 Rambler. Can you believe that this impressive machine is where AMC came from?







And this is for all you "The Simpsons" fans!


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Old 07-03-2019, 10:31 PM
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All very cool, Tom. Especially enjoyed your detailed description of the mechanicals of your family's brass cars. Thanks for sharing. Looks like you all had an awesome vacation, despite the meltdown of the Hupp.

Live well,

SJW
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Old 07-04-2019, 10:29 AM
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Very cool.
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Old 07-06-2019, 05:35 PM
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What a great time! Loved the pics!
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Old 07-07-2019, 02:03 PM
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The Mt. Washington hotel was the site of the the conference at Bretton Woods after WW2 , for you history buffs. The Stanley Hotel feels just like it except it is a little smaller and their is a Stanley Steamer in the lobby. Stanley built it in Estes Park Colorado, to cure himself of Tuberculois (which it did) and to help others and entertain his upper crust friends from back East. The Stanley Hotel was the inspiration for Stephen King's novel ,The Shinning . Word has it that he got caught in a late season(end of season) snow storm with only the caretakers there. It must have freaked him out somewhat. King was angry the film was not filmed there, however the TV version was. Parts of Dumb and Dumber were filmed there. Worth a look if your in the neighborhood. Years ago when I visited the Mt. Washington Hotel they were talking about spending major bucks so that you can stay there any time of the year. The rooms were $400-$500 a night way back then, hate to think of what they are now. With decent weather(don't count on it) and keen eyesight you can see the cog train climbing the mountain.

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Old 07-08-2019, 10:33 PM
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Wow, great pics and stories. Thanks for sharing! I can't even imagine any kind of real travel in a Steamer. Having spend a couple summers driving a narrow-gauge steam train at my local Six Flags park, I am familiar with the work load. But at least those can carry a lot of water and fuel! I also quickly learned to respect the beast, as there are several ways with a steam engine to make your day go really, really badly (and other peoples' days, too). What a great experience for you all!
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Old 07-09-2019, 12:03 AM
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Thanks for looking/reading, guys...glad some of you are finding enjoyment from it!

Auggy, thanks for the additional info on the Mt Washington Hotel...and the Stanley. I find it all very interesting...I'd like to visit the Stanley hotel some day. One thing that was hard for me to fathom at both the Mt Washington AND the Mtn View Grand...was how prim and proper everything was. They were both VERY impressively maintained properties. I don't know how they do it. Even with the high room rates (and the Mt Washington -as you recalled- did have some high rates!) I can't get my head around how that could cover the operating costs of a place like that. The Mtn View Grand, which has got to be similarly "money sucking" for maintenance and upkeep, our rooms there were only $155/night. I bargain, for what you're getting. Bargain. I don't know how they do it, but I'd go right back to the Mtn View Grand, any time. It was a high quality experience/lodging, for very reasonable rates.



Originally Posted by MatthewMiller View Post
I can't even imagine any kind of real travel in a Steamer.
So check this out. There is a guy that has been a member of the local antique car group that I grew up with in Mass, that is known as the guru of Stanley Steamers, Brent Campbell. Since my youngest memories, he has been the nicest guy and always "the man" when it came to steamers. He was always showing up to meets, tours etc with some Big, Bad Stanley with some sporty history.
ANYWAY, the guy shows up to our tour two weeks ago, Tuesday evening, in a restored, one off car that F.E. Stanley had custom made for his son: a two seater, w/the "big" 30 hp boiler and engine. This car....




Brent old now...old. He rolls up to the hotel in this thing, and parks at about 8 PM... I recognized him immediately and he did me, as well. We exchanged hello's and I notice a leather luggage bag, bungie corded to the rear deck. I ask him, "Did you just drive here from Mass!?" (a 171 mile drive)! He replies, "Yep, I did." I couldn't believe it. This would be an ALL day trek in our Hudson or the Hupp...and driving those on the interstate is out of the question. I asked, "Did you take the interstates!?" He replies, "Yep". I couldn't believe it. Cars passing you, semi's blowing by you...*I* wouldn't do it! I ask further, "How fast were you able to go on the highway?" He replied, "I averaged about 75 mph". Holy ***. In a 1912 steam car.

Like you Matt, I can't imagine any kind of real travel in a Steamer. But this guy, 75+ years old, throws his clothes in a bag, and hits the road for a 170+ mile evening jaunt up to northern NH in a '12 Steamer. !


.

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Old 07-09-2019, 02:02 AM
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Originally Posted by Tom400CFI View Post
Brent old now...old. He rolls up to the hotel in this thing, and parks at about 8 PM... I recognized him immediately and he did me, as well. We exchanged hello's and I notice a leather luggage bag, bungie corded to the rear deck. I ask him, "Did you just drive here from Mass!?" (a 171 mile drive)! He replies, "Yep, I did." I couldn't believe it. This would be an ALL day trek in our Hudson or the Hupp...and driving those on the interstate is out of the question. I asked, "Did you take the interstates!?" He replies, "Yep". I couldn't believe it. Cars passing you, semi's blowing by you...*I* wouldn't do it! I ask further, "How fast were you able to go on the highway?" He replied, "I averaged about 75 mph". Holy ***. In a 1912 steam car.

Like you Matt, I can't imagine any kind of real travel in a Steamer. But this guy, 75+ years old, throws his clothes in a bag, and hits the road for a 170+ mile evening jaunt up to northern NH in a '12 Steamer. !.
That's both awesome and hilarious! That car could have competed at the Indy 500 in its day. Seriously.
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Old 07-10-2019, 07:27 PM
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I would love to have one of those old cars.
Looks like lots of fun!
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Old 07-11-2019, 12:21 AM
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I would highly recommend getting one. Brass is pretty affordable right now, and there isn't a modern car in which you are nearly as "engaged w/the mechanism", as you are in these cars. I mean, you have to know how cars work, just to operate one properly, so you're constantly listening, assessing, feeling, adjusting....it's quite an engaging driving experience.

BUT....IDK how you'd use one of these cars in UT. The roads are so big and wide open, everyone drives SO fast....I just can't figure where you'd safely and enjoyably drive one of them around here. Otherwise, I'd probably have one here.
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Old 07-11-2019, 01:24 AM
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Thanks for sharing. Looks like a great time and some great memories as well.
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