Go Back  CorvetteForum - Chevrolet Corvette Forum Discussion > C7 Corvette > C7 Forced Induction/Nitrous
Reload this Page >

Improved air to water intercooler performance for supercharged C7 w/photos

C7 Forced Induction/Nitrous C7 Corvette Turbochargers, Superchargers, Pulley Upgrades, Intercoolers, Wet and Dry Nitrous Injection, Meth
Sponsored by:
Sponsored by:

Improved air to water intercooler performance for supercharged C7 w/photos

 
Old 01-21-2017, 12:12 PM
  #1  
Patrick G
CF Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Patrick G's Avatar
 
Member Since: Oct 2005
Location: Victoria Texas
Posts: 188
Thanks: 0
Thanked 19 Times in 11 Posts
Default

Although the photos a from my personal 2016 C7 Stingray with the Magnuson 2300 Heartbeat supercharger, the lessons learned can apply to any C7 Z06. One of the biggest issues with a supercharged engine is properly cooling the air charge. An air to water intercooler is very efficient as long as the IC bricks are properly sized and have an adequate supply of cool water going across them. The OEM 1740 supercharger has really good intercooler bricks and so does the Magnuson HB 2300 supercharger seen here.

The problem is getting adequate amounts of cool water through the IC bricks with enough reserve behind it. Here's the Magnuson kit as originally installed. Notice the hose arrangement and the small fill reservoir at the bottom of the photo.

Here's the IC piping. Notice how you have hoses for the passenger side IC brick T off of the driver's side. The hoses are small 1/2" lines and the passenger side doesn't get as much direct flow with the T arrangement vs a proper y-connection.

Another problem is reserve capacity and flow direction. The OEM supercharger and the Magnuson intercooler capacity are only around 1/2 gallon of fluid total. My solution was to add over 2 gallons of additional fluid capacity and reverse the direction of flow. You see, when you add a large water box, you have the ability to add ice for race days to REALLY cool the air charge. But in the factory arrangement, the flow would go from the water box, to the pump, to the heat exchanger, into the engine, and back to the water box. If you were running ice, the cold water would get warmed up by the heat exchanger, then goes into the engine, then hot water out of the IC bricks would flow into the ice box and melt your ice quickly. The ideal solution was to reverse the flow. Let the ice water go into the IC bricks first, then the hot IC water goes into the heat exchanger so it will remove some heat, then the pump will put the cooled down water back into your ice box. This is a much more efficient way to cool the air charge.

Now you need extra flow. The stock Z06 pump is barely adequate for the stock engine and even the Varimax pump lacks volume and pressure needed for a higher boost application. Enter the Stewart EMP Pump which was then sped up from 12000 rpm to 36000 rpm. This improves the flow to over 8 gallons per minute.

Next the outlets from the IC bricks needed to be modified to accept a much larger #12 hose vs a 1/2" hose.

But with bigger hoses, you need a proper ice tank built. Not just one with an inlet and outlet facing each other and no way to mix with the cool water, but one with proper baffling and piping to allow the mixture to be redistributed across the ice. Check out the magic inside the water box. The water comes from the heat exchanger to the bottom of the box at the front, goes into a pipe, then is sprayed across the top of the ice to ensure good mixing of the cool water in the tank. The outlet has a screen to ensure that no large ice particles enter the intercooler bricks.

All installation and fabrication of the connectors, lines, and water box were performed by Kevin Kesterson of M2K Motorsports. The results were amazing. Without changing the Magnuson heat exchanger or modifying the bricks, my IAT temps now only rise 1/3 as much as they did before during a 1/2 mile pull. My water temps went from 80 degrees to 110 degrees in a 160+ mph pull where they used to rise to around 170f with the previous arrangement. Pulls with ice performed the same, but the ice water rose from 45f to 75f in the same pull. Hats off to all involved in this great project.

Here's a short video showing the vast amount of coolant coming from the heat exchanger being mixed in the water tank before it's sent to the intercooler bricks.
Attached Images               

Last edited by Steven Bell; 07-21-2018 at 06:05 PM. Reason: Merged Posts
Patrick G is offline  
Old 01-21-2017, 04:28 PM
  #2  
mesparza
CF Member
 
mesparza's Avatar
 
Member Since: Nov 2016
Posts: 95
Thanked 13 Times in 13 Posts
Default

Nice methodical approach to solving a problem. I like that it wasn't just a single band aid fix.
mesparza is offline  
Old 01-22-2017, 08:38 AM
  #3  
vettenutchas
CF Senior Member
 
Member Since: May 2011
Location: austintown ohio
Posts: 689
Thanks: 0
Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Default

Is this going to be available as a kit? Outstanding work!
vettenutchas is offline  
Old 06-19-2018, 01:36 PM
  #4  
The T-man
CF Senior Member
 
The T-man's Avatar
 
Member Since: Oct 2017
Posts: 499
Thanked 13 Times in 11 Posts
Default

Another problem is reserve capacity and flow direction. The OEM supercharger and the Magnuson intercooler capacity are only around 1/2 gallon of fluid total. My solution was to add over 2 gallons of additional fluid capacity and reverse the direction of flow. You see, when you add a large water box, you have the ability to add ice for race days to REALLY cool the air charge. But in the factory arrangement, the flow would go from the water box, to the pump, to the heat exchanger, into the engine, and back to the water box. If you were running ice, the cold water would get warmed up by the heat exchanger, then goes into the engine, then hot water out of the IC bricks would flow into the ice box and melt your ice quickly. The ideal solution was to reverse the flow. Let the ice water go into the IC bricks first, then the hot IC water goes into the heat exchanger so it will remove some heat, then the pump will put the cooled down water back into your ice box. This is a much more efficient way to cool the air charge.
________________________________
Why didn't GM run it this way?
The T-man is offline  
Old 06-19-2018, 02:31 PM
  #5  
Earl H
CF Senior Member
 
Earl H's Avatar
 
Member Since: Sep 2002
Location: MI
Posts: 2,973
Thanked 63 Times in 49 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Patrick G View Post
Another problem is reserve capacity and flow direction. The OEM supercharger and the Magnuson intercooler capacity are only around 1/2 gallon of fluid total. My solution was to add over 2 gallons of additional fluid capacity and reverse the direction of flow. You see, when you add a large water box, you have the ability to add ice for race days to REALLY cool the air charge. But in the factory arrangement, the flow would go from the water box, to the pump, to the heat exchanger, into the engine, and back to the water box. If you were running ice, the cold water would get warmed up by the heat exchanger, then goes into the engine, then hot water out of the IC bricks would flow into the ice box and melt your ice quickly. The ideal solution was to reverse the flow. Let the ice water go into the IC bricks first, then the hot IC water goes into the heat exchanger so it will remove some heat, then the pump will put the cooled down water back into your ice box. This is a much more efficient way to cool the air charge.

Now you need extra flow. The stock Z06 pump is barely adequate for the stock engine and even the Varimax pump lacks volume and pressure needed for a higher boost application. Enter the Stewart EMP Pump which was then sped up from 12000 rpm to 36000 rpm. This improves the flow to over 8 gallons per minute.
What size is that Y fitting: Single/Dual sides?
Earl H is offline  
Old 06-19-2018, 05:05 PM
  #6  
IM4A2Z
CF Senior Member
 
IM4A2Z's Avatar
 
Member Since: Oct 2002
Location: Addison TX
Posts: 429
Thanked 31 Times in 27 Posts
Default

It would be nice to have an insulation layer around that tank to stop radiant heat from the motor and exhaust manifolds warming the metal.
IM4A2Z is offline  
Old 07-13-2018, 11:55 AM
  #7  
lane_change
CF Senior Member
 
lane_change's Avatar
 
Member Since: May 2010
Location: Katy TX
Posts: 2,378
Thanks: 0
Thanked 7 Times in 7 Posts
Default

Similar to Patrick G, Kevin at M2K did our water tank and utilizes the same baffles, internal piping for even distribution, etc...and then we ceramic coated it and added insulation to the tank itself to further reduce any thermal losses from radiant or ambient heating. This is in the car as well, but their attention to detail is always on point. Over 14GPM through this setup using the Stewart EMP, 1" hoses, A2W intercooler, and Custom Chiller HX.

A properly designed setup is much more important than simply having capacity. Flow rates are where it's at...but so many use a POS Rule pump because it's cheap and claims to flow numbers that it can't back up.

lane_change is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to lane_change For This Useful Post:
wildgoat (07-20-2018)
Old 07-20-2018, 02:23 PM
  #8  
wildgoat
CF Member
 
Member Since: May 2010
Location: Santa Fe NM
Posts: 91
Thanked 6 Times in 3 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by The T-man View Post
Another problem is reserve capacity and flow direction. The OEM supercharger and the Magnuson intercooler capacity are only around 1/2 gallon of fluid total. My solution was to add over 2 gallons of additional fluid capacity and reverse the direction of flow. You see, when you add a large water box, you have the ability to add ice for race days to REALLY cool the air charge. But in the factory arrangement, the flow would go from the water box, to the pump, to the heat exchanger, into the engine, and back to the water box. If you were running ice, the cold water would get warmed up by the heat exchanger, then goes into the engine, then hot water out of the IC bricks would flow into the ice box and melt your ice quickly. The ideal solution was to reverse the flow. Let the ice water go into the IC bricks first, then the hot IC water goes into the heat exchanger so it will remove some heat, then the pump will put the cooled down water back into your ice box. This is a much more efficient way to cool the air charge.
________________________________
Why didn't GM run it this way?
I am curious as well... any thoughts?
wildgoat is offline  
Old 07-21-2018, 05:28 PM
  #9  
3 Z06ZR1
CF Senior Member
 
Member Since: Mar 2005
Location: salem OR
Posts: 20,943
Thanked 846 Times in 703 Posts
Default

Very nice job by the OP! Very sweet!
3 Z06ZR1 is offline  
Old 02-26-2019, 10:20 AM
  #10  
Z06Norway
CF Senior Member
 
Z06Norway's Avatar
 
Member Since: Nov 2000
Location: Merritt Island Florida
Posts: 1,976
Thanked 101 Times in 72 Posts
Default

Any piggy back harness that go into stock OEM plug so you don't have to butcher stock wire/cable to new IC pump?


And there is three wires going to stock pump, 1, 4 and 5 ...
4 is ground, but why two identical wires going to 1 and 5 ?

anyone know ?



TIA


Rune

Last edited by Z06Norway; 02-27-2019 at 07:44 AM.
Z06Norway is offline  
 


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Quick Reply: Improved air to water intercooler performance for supercharged C7 w/photos


Sponsored Ads
Vendor Directory

Contact Us - About Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

© 2019 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.
 
  • Ask a Question
    Get answers from community experts
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: