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Z06 wheel bending questions

 
Old 12-15-2017, 08:17 PM
  #21  
3 Z06ZR1
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Originally Posted by Poor-sha View Post
Both cracked and two of the bent were the satin black cup wheels.

What really sucks is that while you can get an entire set for like $1500, try to buy a single replacement and they are $500+ each.
I paid 325 shipped to replace a curbed Satin cup wheel. The ordered a set
of 4 machined GS cups for 1400. shipped. Both from forum vendors.
No issue with them bending. Was shocked at the new car take offs with 1500 miles the black Z06 wheels I sold. I didn't look to see what they were bringing and put them up for 800.00 5-6 people wanting them.
When I could have got 1200.00 Irony was the buyer said one of them was BENT. That is the closest I have come to bent wheel. I only
put on 200 easy miles so it wasn't me. I bought the car with 1500 miles.
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Old 12-15-2017, 10:00 PM
  #22  
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Originally Posted by pika View Post
is this as big of an issue as I see on the forum? How do I mitigate this risk outside of paying $1k for a wheel warranty?

Will non run-flat tires help? I usually keep the car in Touring and know not to use Track mode unless at the track

can a bend be straightened out and not have to be replaced? I am seeing some horror stories about all 4 wheels bending...
I too wanted to avoid paying $800 for wheel insurance I might ever use. I signed up anyways and left the dealership feeling 'tricked'. Fast forward 1 year later and came to find out that three wheels were bent. One was not repairable. After a horrendous experience with the insurance company, I had 1 wheels fixed and one replaced. And I still have a few more years worth of repairs for the $800 I dropped. So, I hindsight, I'm glad I got the insurance. BTW. I live in norther MD near the Pennsylvania border and the roads are not great (southern Pennsylvania roads are even worse). So, yeah depending on the conditions of your roads these wheels will bend-frequently and easily.
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Old 12-16-2017, 12:34 AM
  #23  
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2016 ZO6 with 8000 miles. Three bent and one cracked wheel so far all on major Texas highways. Ruined two vacasions. Was able to get the three bent wheels repaired.

Swiched to forged wheels and NRF tires. Not enough miles to conclusively state that this will solve the problem. However, I do belive that RF tires, extra wide cast wheels and driving in sport mode all contributed to the problem. I now drive in tour when traveling xcountry. Also scheduled this Monday to have GM's new suspension calibration downloaded. Hopfully this will allow me to driving in sport mode. Is this a backdoor way for GM to reduce the bent wheel problem?

As another bench mark, a friend of mine has bent seven wheels so far. Fortunitely for him, he has wheel and tire insurance. I don't.
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Old 12-16-2017, 10:22 AM
  #24  
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I guess I will cross that bridge if it happens. It amazes me that multiple people can bend 5+ wheels and there isn't some kind of recall. I have seen some posts where guys have gotten it covered under regular warranty.

I had originally gotten some kind of wheel warranty with a company called AAGI since the dealer pushed me into buying it but I cancelled. It has a 1.1 star rating with 60+ reviews along with a bunch of ripoff reports.

If I get multiple occurrences of wheel bending I will probably end up selling the car earlier than planned. Not what I wanted to do but I want a stress free experience when owning a new(er) car.

I have gone over some road imperfections because NJ sucks, have put 800 miles on the car in the month that I have owned it. No vibrations yet

Last edited by pika; 12-16-2017 at 10:23 AM.
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Old 12-16-2017, 10:52 AM
  #25  
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There does seem to be a lot of bent wheel issues, but considering the total number of Z06s sold I wonder what the percentages of buyers experiencing these issues is of the total number of cars sold. A second question would be how many C7 GSs have experienced these issues? The problem may be somewhat resolved for street cruisers with the availability of the planned Michelin Pilot Sport A/S 3+s for the Z06. I had these tires on my C7 stingray and they were great road tires. I had over 30,000 miles on them with no issues and that included two Route 66 trips on really bad roads. I realize the stingray and the Z06 are two very different cars, but I will give them a shot on the Z when they are available. The high speed handling with them was good as well.
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Old 12-16-2017, 11:18 AM
  #26  
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yes I understand that there are a lot more owners who probably don't frequent the forum and probably don't have issues. But sometimes I wish I went with the Stingray for this and a few other reasons, but the wide body look sold me
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Old 12-18-2017, 06:22 PM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by djnice View Post
It is not an issue at all. I put 7500 miles on a GS then 7000 miles on a Z06 both with stock wheels. No bent wheels. I have never met anyone in person that bent the wheels. I was at Spring Mountain in October and no one said anything about bent wheels. I do have forged wheels for the track, but that is so I can run slicks.
It could be an issue for some but most don't have the issue I would say.
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Old 12-19-2017, 12:00 PM
  #28  
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I have a 2016, almost 40K - have cracked 3 rears, 1 front and bent 6. The bent wheels I was able to get straightened. Between the low profile and hard rubber of the tire and the cast aluminum of the wheel, these things just don't like anything but billiard table smooth roads. I put 300K on my C5 and not once bent or cracked a wheel on the same roads.
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Old 12-19-2017, 12:44 PM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by WutDWut
I have a 2016, almost 40K - have cracked 3 rears, 1 front and bent 6. The bent wheels I was able to get straightened. Between the low profile and hard rubber of the tire and the cast aluminum of the wheel, these things just don't like anything but billiard table smooth roads. I put 300K on my C5 and not once bent or cracked a wheel on the same roads.
Damn!!! If that happens I'll reluctantly go aftermarket. I really like the look of the OEM rim. Are there forged versions with that same design out there.
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Old 12-19-2017, 09:56 PM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by Torch-Red-Z06 View Post
Damn!!! If that happens I'll reluctantly go aftermarket. I really like the look of the OEM rim. Are there forged versions with that same design out there.
Yes. Look at Signature Wheel, a forum vendor. I am traveling and can't remember the model number but they look very much like the OEM wheels but better. Text or Email me and will send pictures. 281-221-6850 or [email protected]
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Old 12-20-2017, 01:28 AM
  #31  
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Wow..... bent a wheel on a Volvo S80 once.......but I think you guys just talked me into the basic standard rim when I order. No point paying extra, the 2k for chrome can be used for a set of forged rims down the road.
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Old 12-20-2017, 11:19 AM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by Torch-Red-Z06 View Post
Damn!!! If that happens I'll reluctantly go aftermarket. I really like the look of the OEM rim. Are there forged versions with that same design out there.
Originally Posted by Rickmd View Post
Yes. Look at Signature Wheel, a forum vendor. I am traveling and can't remember the model number but they look very much like the OEM wheels but better. Text or Email me and will send pictures. 281-221-6850 or r.di[email protected].
Thank you Rick! Our SV105 is our improved OEM design with fully forged quality and deep concave while saving weight at the same time
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Old 12-20-2017, 11:46 AM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by Deity.Motorsports View Post
Thank you Rick! Our SV105 is our improved OEM design with fully forged quality and deep concave while saving weight at the same time
OP here this vendor is really great to deal with plus he will call you back even after the sale. great vendor here for your rims.... Yes I have a set from him.. Robert
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Old 12-21-2017, 12:28 PM
  #34  
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I bought a set of 18" Signature SV105 for track use as my OEM wheels kept bending. I liked them so much I bought another set in 19/20 for the street. Excellent wheels which offer the same strength as wheels costing twice as much. Signature wheels also have INDEPENDENT, THIRD PARTY certifications which the majority of high end wheels don't even have. Khoa is great at getting your order correct through Diety Motorsports.
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Old 12-21-2017, 12:30 PM
  #35  
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If anyone is interested here's a post I made some time back addressing the bending of the OEM wheels. I did a real quick qualitative failure analysis identifying the many contributing factors:

Causal analysis dictates accidents/undesired events are NEVER the result of a single cause. The theory in failure analysis is the "Principle of Multiple Causes". Specific to bending wheels on the C7Z there are a good number of multiple causes. For a "bad thing" to happen all of the multiple causes are encountered/occur simultaneously. Several of the many multiple causes that pop to mind relative to the topic at hand:

1. Thin sidewall on low profile tires.

2. Stiff sidewall construction.

3. Very wide wheels resulting in a large moment arm at the outside edge of the wheel.

4. Very tall (i.e., 19" and 20") wheels resulting in minimal structural support at the outside of the wheel. large moment arm.

5. Very wide wheels resulting in minimial structural support/strength along the entire barrel.

6. Thin, lightweight wheels.

7. Inadequate mechanical integrity/strength in wheel design.

8. Stiff suspension regardless of what mode you're running.

9. High speed shock compression is very slow to provide performance.

10. Limited shock travel for handling performance.

11. Roads with surface irregularities.

12. Etc, etc, etc.

Dig deep back into your grey matter to the days of Physics classes and the Conservation of Energy principle. Specifically, "energy can neither be created nor destroyed". The energy has to go somewhere when an event occurs. Typically the weakest part of the system as a whole absorbs/dissipates most of the energy.

Test question: Where is the weakest part of the system in the case of a car traveling on imperfact roads at somewhat high speeds with a stiff shock/spring suspension with relatively short shock travel utilizing tall, wide wheels and tires with stiff, thin sidewalls?

Winner, winner, chicken dinner...

Rick

P.S. MUCH too much discussion and significance is being placed on what suspension setting is being used. It really doesn't matter as it's a relatively MINIMAL contributing factor.

Last edited by rikhek; 12-21-2017 at 12:31 PM.
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Old 12-22-2017, 11:32 PM
  #36  
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Has anyone bent a set of the optional wheels that the dealer installs? Just wondering if their stronger then the base wheels.
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Old 06-02-2019, 12:41 PM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by hcvone View Post
Depends where you live and drive you may or may not ever have a problem, I probably have 7 or 8 C7 Z06 owners that are wax customers of mine that have bent or even in one case broken their wheels. It can happen, my last 2 Z06's I put forged wheels from HRE and Forgeline wheels on them, didn't want to but for me it is peace of mind, funny my cheaper hellcat comes with forged wheels from the factory, and it appears the new ZR1 will have forged wheels, but not the Z06.
I have 3 out of 4 Rims bent on my Z06. Dealer Some kind of Rim Person which i never saw and straightened the Rims but I am NOT Happy.
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Old 06-03-2019, 10:45 AM
  #38  
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Any wheel wearing low profile tires can and often do bend when hitting something. The wheels do not just bend spontaneously. When I drive I am always on the look out for raised joints pot holes or just rough pavement. I avoid it all. If you do too, you will not bend wheels. The wheels on our car are not cast as many like to say. I have to wonder if a lot of the bent wheel talk isn't brought up by people selling after market wheels. There is an ask tadge about the wheels, and if you read it you will see that the wheels are not cast, and are not in any way sub par. They are designed for our cars and work great. What ever you do, do not buy a heavier wheel....lighter is always better, heavier means more unsprung weight, which hurts handling acceleration, stopping, and bump control.
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Old 06-03-2019, 06:35 PM
  #39  
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Originally Posted by Road machine View Post
Any wheel wearing low profile tires can and often do bend when hitting something. The wheels do not just bend spontaneously. When I drive I am always on the look out for raised joints pot holes or just rough pavement. I avoid it all. If you do too, you will not bend wheels. The wheels on our car are not cast as many like to say. I have to wonder if a lot of the bent wheel talk isn't brought up by people selling after market wheels. There is an ask tadge about the wheels, and if you read it you will see that the wheels are not cast, and are not in any way sub par. They are designed for our cars and work great. What ever you do, do not buy a heavier wheel....lighter is always better, heavier means more unsprung weight, which hurts handling acceleration, stopping, and bump control.
Geez, I don't want to get into this again but let's be honest to the OP. There's a definite problem with the OEM wheels with many owners having bent and cracked wheels and these aren't shills for after market sellers. The wheels are cast and the the outside rim edge is flow-formed which is the equivalent of a flow-forged wheel; those are in the low range of strength vs. true forged wheels. And, they're made either in China or Mexico depending on the time they were made. Of course, the OEM's don't bend or crack spontaneously but something causes it and it's not just potholes. A lot of the posters don't recall hitting anything of note and many only discovered the problem after the tire started to leak air via the cracked rim or they were putting on new tires and the tire shop showed them the damage. Tadge's explanation was self-serving to GM and simply dismissed the problem as though it doesn't exist; sort of like a guy denying the barn's on fire when the flames are shooting up behind him. OP should also be made aware that a class-action lawsuit was filed against GM 4 weeks ago for this very issue. BTW the same problem exists with the GS's as they have the same wheels, width-wise.

For the OP's benefit here's a run-down on wheels that I've posted previously in other threads;

1. Cast aluminum wheels
2. Flow-Formed wheels
3. 1-piece "Monoblock" forged wheels
4. 2-piece welded construction wheels
5. 2-piece bolted construction wheels
6. 3-piece bolted construction wheels

Cast Aluminum Wheels
These are the lowest priced wheels, and are typically what are found on production vehicles. Cast aluminum wheels are created by pouring molten aluminum into a mold that is shaped like a wheel. This produces a wheel casting. Some final machining work is then done to clean up the rough surface, and paint/finishing is applied.

Pros: Lowest price, easiest to mass-produce.
Cons: More brittle than forged wheels. Spoke details and edges aren't as sharp as a machined forged wheel. Heaviest weight of all wheel construction types. Lowest quality. Limited offsets, width increments, diameter selection available. Nearly impossible to repair when cracked or severely bent - safely, that is. A damaged cast wheel usually needs to be replaced.

Flow-Formed Wheels (Rotary Forged)
Flow-Formed wheels start out identical to cast poured wheels, but with different hoop thickness. The casting process above is used to create the spoke pattern only. Then the wheel castings are put into a flow-forming machine to form the outer hoops. This is done using high heat and high pressure rollers, which "flow-form" the outer hoop. This results in a stronger outer hoop, with aligned aluminum grain structure. The resulting wheel is a cast faced wheel with a hoop that has properties similar to a forged wheel. They are stronger and lighter than cast wheels.

Pros: Low Price, Lightweight, Higher strength than cast wheels.
Cons: Cast face still lacks the sharp edges and details of a machined forged wheel. Limited width increments and diameters available. Hard to repair when severely bent or cracked.

1-Piece Monoblock Forged Wheels
The term "Monoblock" is used throughout the industry to describe the 1-piece forged wheels. "Mono" meaning one, and "Block" meaning it was created from one block of aluminum. The block in this case is actually a round bar stock of high quality, aerospace-quality 6061-T6 Aluminum Alloy. The round bar is pressed in a huge forging machine, to stamp out a wheel shaped blank. Forging is a hot working process, and helps to align the grain structure of the alloy. This results in a very strong, very lightweight wheel construction material. The wheel blank is then flow-formed to create the outer barrel shape. Following that process, the wheel blank is loaded into a CNC milling machine and there the spoke pattern is milled out.

Pros: Lightest of the forged wheel construction methods.
Cons: Priced about the same as expensive 3-piece construction. Difficult to repair when bent or severely damaged.

2-Piece Welded Construction Forged Wheels
These are considered the entry level forged wheels, as they are priced slightly lower than 3-piece forged wheels. The centers start out as a blank of forged 6061-T6 Aluminum alloy, and the spoke patterns are CNC machined with a milling machine. The wheel hoop is also a forged aluminum material. On a 2-piece wheel, the center is simply welded to the hoop on the backside of the wheel. Some manufacturers also offer cast aluminum centers, to reduce cost. Quality and weight of the cast centers is not as good as forged/machined, however.

Pros: Lowest Price of the Forged wheels. Same weight, appearance, quality as 3-piece wheels.
Cons: Limited widths increments available. Cannot easily chrome plate or paint the lip, since it has to be welded on. More difficult to repair a bent lip compared to a 3-piece wheel, as the center has to be cut out and a new hoop welded on.

2-Piece Bolted Construction Forged Wheels
These are built very similar to the 2-piece welded construction wheels above, but use a hoop that has a bolting ring already in place. Instead of welding the center to the hoop, it is simply bolted on. This is the least common method of forged wheel construction, as the hoops tend to cost more than simple welded hoops. Some manufacturers also offer cast aluminum centers, to reduce cost. Quality and weight of the cast centers is not as good as forged/machined, however.

Pros: Lips can be easily chrome plated or painted, since no welding required. Easier to replace a hoop when it gets bent.
Cons: Limited width increments available. Few brands offer this type.

3-Piece Forged Wheels
Three piece forged wheels are usually the most expensive wheel construction, mostly due to the assembly labor and components used. The wheels consist of three main pieces; the center, the outer hoop (lip), and the inner hoop. These three parts are held together with a series of perimeter bolts. Silicone RTV is used to seal between the two hoops. Some manufacturers also offer cast aluminum centers, to reduce cost. Quality and weight of the cast centers is not as good as forged/machined, however.

Pros: Most width increments available, truly perfect fitments available. Easiest of all wheels to repair if lip gets bent or damaged, as hoops are easy to replace. Easy to paint or chrome plate lip, since no welding is required. Can have different color rear hoop and outer hoop, since they are two different pieces. Highest resale value for used wheels.
Cons: Most expensive forged wheel construction. RTV silicone seal can be damaged by inexperience tire installers, resulting in leaks.


Last edited by tertiumquid; 06-03-2019 at 06:41 PM.
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Old 06-04-2019, 10:38 AM
  #40  
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Originally Posted by tertiumquid View Post
Geez, I don't want to get into this again but let's be honest to the OP. There's a definite problem with the OEM wheels with many owners having bent and cracked wheels and these aren't shills for after market sellers. The wheels are cast and the the outside rim edge is flow-formed which is the equivalent of a flow-forged wheel; those are in the low range of strength vs. true forged wheels. And, they're made either in China or Mexico depending on the time they were made. Of course, the OEM's don't bend or crack spontaneously but something causes it and it's not just potholes. A lot of the posters don't recall hitting anything of note and many only discovered the problem after the tire started to leak air via the cracked rim or they were putting on new tires and the tire shop showed them the damage. Tadge's explanation was self-serving to GM and simply dismissed the problem as though it doesn't exist; sort of like a guy denying the barn's on fire when the flames are shooting up behind him. OP should also be made aware that a class-action lawsuit was filed against GM 4 weeks ago for this very issue. BTW the same problem exists with the GS's as they have the same wheels, width-wise.

For the OP's benefit here's a run-down on wheels that I've posted previously in other threads;

1. Cast aluminum wheels
2. Flow-Formed wheels
3. 1-piece "Monoblock" forged wheels
4. 2-piece welded construction wheels
5. 2-piece bolted construction wheels
6. 3-piece bolted construction wheels

Cast Aluminum Wheels
These are the lowest priced wheels, and are typically what are found on production vehicles. Cast aluminum wheels are created by pouring molten aluminum into a mold that is shaped like a wheel. This produces a wheel casting. Some final machining work is then done to clean up the rough surface, and paint/finishing is applied.

Pros: Lowest price, easiest to mass-produce.
Cons: More brittle than forged wheels. Spoke details and edges aren't as sharp as a machined forged wheel. Heaviest weight of all wheel construction types. Lowest quality. Limited offsets, width increments, diameter selection available. Nearly impossible to repair when cracked or severely bent - safely, that is. A damaged cast wheel usually needs to be replaced.

Flow-Formed Wheels (Rotary Forged)
Flow-Formed wheels start out identical to cast poured wheels, but with different hoop thickness. The casting process above is used to create the spoke pattern only. Then the wheel castings are put into a flow-forming machine to form the outer hoops. This is done using high heat and high pressure rollers, which "flow-form" the outer hoop. This results in a stronger outer hoop, with aligned aluminum grain structure. The resulting wheel is a cast faced wheel with a hoop that has properties similar to a forged wheel. They are stronger and lighter than cast wheels.

Pros: Low Price, Lightweight, Higher strength than cast wheels.
Cons: Cast face still lacks the sharp edges and details of a machined forged wheel. Limited width increments and diameters available. Hard to repair when severely bent or cracked.

1-Piece Monoblock Forged Wheels
The term "Monoblock" is used throughout the industry to describe the 1-piece forged wheels. "Mono" meaning one, and "Block" meaning it was created from one block of aluminum. The block in this case is actually a round bar stock of high quality, aerospace-quality 6061-T6 Aluminum Alloy. The round bar is pressed in a huge forging machine, to stamp out a wheel shaped blank. Forging is a hot working process, and helps to align the grain structure of the alloy. This results in a very strong, very lightweight wheel construction material. The wheel blank is then flow-formed to create the outer barrel shape. Following that process, the wheel blank is loaded into a CNC milling machine and there the spoke pattern is milled out.

Pros: Lightest of the forged wheel construction methods.
Cons: Priced about the same as expensive 3-piece construction. Difficult to repair when bent or severely damaged.

2-Piece Welded Construction Forged Wheels
These are considered the entry level forged wheels, as they are priced slightly lower than 3-piece forged wheels. The centers start out as a blank of forged 6061-T6 Aluminum alloy, and the spoke patterns are CNC machined with a milling machine. The wheel hoop is also a forged aluminum material. On a 2-piece wheel, the center is simply welded to the hoop on the backside of the wheel. Some manufacturers also offer cast aluminum centers, to reduce cost. Quality and weight of the cast centers is not as good as forged/machined, however.

Pros: Lowest Price of the Forged wheels. Same weight, appearance, quality as 3-piece wheels.
Cons: Limited widths increments available. Cannot easily chrome plate or paint the lip, since it has to be welded on. More difficult to repair a bent lip compared to a 3-piece wheel, as the center has to be cut out and a new hoop welded on.

2-Piece Bolted Construction Forged Wheels
These are built very similar to the 2-piece welded construction wheels above, but use a hoop that has a bolting ring already in place. Instead of welding the center to the hoop, it is simply bolted on. This is the least common method of forged wheel construction, as the hoops tend to cost more than simple welded hoops. Some manufacturers also offer cast aluminum centers, to reduce cost. Quality and weight of the cast centers is not as good as forged/machined, however.

Pros: Lips can be easily chrome plated or painted, since no welding required. Easier to replace a hoop when it gets bent.
Cons: Limited width increments available. Few brands offer this type.

3-Piece Forged Wheels
Three piece forged wheels are usually the most expensive wheel construction, mostly due to the assembly labor and components used. The wheels consist of three main pieces; the center, the outer hoop (lip), and the inner hoop. These three parts are held together with a series of perimeter bolts. Silicone RTV is used to seal between the two hoops. Some manufacturers also offer cast aluminum centers, to reduce cost. Quality and weight of the cast centers is not as good as forged/machined, however.

Pros: Most width increments available, truly perfect fitments available. Easiest of all wheels to repair if lip gets bent or damaged, as hoops are easy to replace. Easy to paint or chrome plate lip, since no welding is required. Can have different color rear hoop and outer hoop, since they are two different pieces. Highest resale value for used wheels.
Cons: Most expensive forged wheel construction. RTV silicone seal can be damaged by inexperience tire installers, resulting in leaks.

The problem with your theory, is that if all the wheels on our Corvettes are made the same...and they are.....then why are they not all failing.(in fact that vast majority are not) The issue is not nearly as common as you and a few others make it sound. And the fact of the matter is that any wheel will bend if it hits something hard enough. You act like a class action law suit is some kind of proof of an issue.....but as we all know anybody can file a law suit.....winning it is something else.....let us know when the class action is won, because until then it is just another frivolous suit like all the others destroying this country.


To the op.....read the ask Tadge thread. It is not about bent wheels, it is about center lock wheels but it addresses the construction of our wheels. You cannot drive a car like a Z06 ( or Ferrari or Lambo, etc) as though it were a pick up truck. The low profile tires on all of these cars are meant to give you excellent lateral traction but the sacrifice is very little impact protection. But that comes not from the wheel design but the tire design. So as I have said over and over again if you drive a car like this you must avoid bad pot holes raised lips etc. If not you will bend a wheel. If you bend a wheel and do not get it fixed, it will eventually crack. The other thing you should know about a car like this is that if you get a nail or screw in a tire, it cannot be repaired. This is due to the speed rating of the tire and no repair shop will fix it. Also if you have more than a few hundred miles on the car when you get a flat, you will have to replace both tires if on the back since the uneven sizes of the tires would burn out your posi rear. Look for future class action suits about GM not warrantying for nails in tires soon, as it seems that a bunch of children who cannot accept responsibility for their actions bought a bunch of these cars.


Finally one issue that must be addressed. The tires on these cars are unbelievably hard to remove and install, as are all such low profile tires. They are little more than a very tough rubber band. If you have ever watched these wheels being changed you would understand what I am talking about. It is very easy to bend the wheel with the tire machine. One wrong placement of the bead breaker( and it often has to be repositioned alot) and you have a bent wheel. Do you think that guy making minimum wage at your local discount tire place is going to take the blame if and when he does this? Don't count on it and don't count on his manager stepping up to do the right thing. I have not had to replace the tires on my new Z06 yet but with my C6 Z06 and all other sprots cars we owned, before I went to the tire guy I just put the car up on the lift and put a dial indicator on each wheel and checked for any bend.....I would video it as well. Only once and not on my Z06 (on my wife's Mercedes) did this pay off. After indicating the wheels and finding no bent wheel, I took it to a tire shop and after installing the new tires they came out to tell me the wheel was bent. I took the manager aside and showed him the video of my test prior to bringing the car over. After a very short attempt to deny they did the damage, he went over to the guy who changed the tires and came back saying they would cover repairing the wheel. They would never have done this without the proof. So protect yourself. A dial indicator is cheap and the test is simple....way cheaper than a new wheel and way easier than the BS you will go through finding a new wheel.

Last edited by Road machine; 06-04-2019 at 10:38 AM.
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