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Sam Adams Beer Glass

 
Old 05-13-2010, 07:03 PM
  #41  
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many bars will also stock unique glassware for every brand of beer they serve,
This is pretty much true where we go..
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Old 05-13-2010, 07:20 PM
  #42  
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I have four of them that were given too me at a local restaurant when I told the barman how cool they were. They are my favorite....but very fragile..be careful in the dishwasher.
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Old 05-13-2010, 07:59 PM
  #43  
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Originally Posted by EHS View Post
I had assumed the OP was looking into whether the taste is affected.

I was referring to the whole experience of consumption, but yes, taste was the primary concern.

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Old 05-13-2010, 08:37 PM
  #44  
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Originally Posted by pewter99 View Post
we have:


2 Blue Point pint glasses


These are pint glasses and my favorites
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Old 05-13-2010, 09:12 PM
  #45  
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you put them in the dishwasher?

NEVER do that!

If you have to wash them, use beer soap

better yet, just rinse them and let them drip dry.
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Old 05-13-2010, 09:28 PM
  #46  
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Originally Posted by EHS View Post
No Tim, I'm right, and I'm glad you quoted that to prove it.

Nowhere in that quote does it say the glass shape affects the taste of the beer.

I had assumed the OP was looking into whether the taste is affected.

Your quote only deals with the presentation, specifically how the beer foams. As does the rest of that web site article (briefly skimmed). That's of course, if you think Beer Advocate is the authority on all things beer, which it clearly is not. And their reviews of the beers prove it. Now, were you to quote Michael Jackson, that would be different.

But thank you for making a good point, i.e., that the shape does not change the taste.

You didn't actually read the article did you? Try reading the third paragraph again. The foam of the beer acts as a net for the volatiles which are what give the beer it's aroma, which effects the taste. Try holding your nose while you eat or drink something and it's not the same. Your sense of smell has a great affect on your sense of taste.

Here's another article for you from realbeer.com

Picking the proper beer glass

March 22, 2001

You don't have to take glassware as seriously as a Belgian beer cafe to benefit from using a glass that flatters the style of beer you choose for the moment. As well as the visual aesthetics -- a beautiful beer looks even better in a beautiful glass -- there are serious tasting considerations when making your choice.

Yes, we know people who have ordered beer in Belgium and then been told they couldn't get it NOT because the cafe didn't have the beer in stock but because they didn't have the proper glass to serve it from. No country in the world does as wonderful job of matching beer glass to beer style, and even individual beers, as Belgium. Breweries all make their own glasses with colorful logos, and offer different styles for different beers they brew.

For instance, if you order a Lindemans Framboise, it is best enjoyed in a champagne-style flute with Lindemans logo on the side. Drink Hooegarden White in a stocky tumbler, but try the Hooegarden Speciale in its own flute. Have Duvel in a large tulip goblet, and ... we go could on an on.

One way to decide what kind of glass to use is to study Michael Jackson's Great Beer Guide because the 500-plus beers featured are pictured with glassware provided by their brewers.

OK, we'll back up. You're probably not ready to go out and buy 300 beer glasses, and you sure don't have any place to store them. Let's start instead with six glasses that will cover most occasions:

Basic pint glasses - Many brewpubs and bars use tumbler or shaker pint Pint glassglasses, and you've probably got some of those at home. These are sturdy, easy to stack and OK for serving many styles of beer. That's why they are popular, but it also means that they aren't great at anything. A British-style pint glass, bulged near the rim, will serve you better for pale ales, bitter, porters and stouts. The glass will draw in the distinctive aroma hops you expect in an American pale ale, while also capturing the darker, roasted malt flavors of stout.

Pilsner glass Pilsner glasses - A proper pilsner glass is tall with an inverted cone shape and focuses the hop aroma of a beer. It allows for zesty carbonation and a robust head.

Weizen glasses - You need the height of one of these to serve a traditional Bavarian weizen (wheat) with a big head and high carbonation. The slightly bowed-out shape and narrower top will focus the yeasty, fruity aroma.

Weisen glass

GobletGoblets - Excellent for big and malty beers where hop aroma plays a small role in the flavor profile. The bowl should be big enough to hold the whole beer and still collect the aromas you want to savor before drinking. Some call these chalices, some goblets and while their may be a technical distinction between the two don't worry about it.

Tulip Tulips and snifters - These accentuate the nose for specially aromatic beers. A snifter has a somewhat smaller opening and taller cup. Its design is perfect for aromatic Belgian ales. Snifters are ideal for barley wines, allowing the complexity of malt aromas and alcohol to blend. Yes, a brandy snifter will work fine. If you are serving smaller amounts then wine glasses make an acceptable alternative.

Thistles - We are getting into specialty glassware here but these are too Thistlecute to leave out. The are bowed at the bottom, then open a little like a pilsner. They also work with Belgian ales, but think of them first when drinking Scottish ales. They will accent the malty aromas while allowing your beer to sneak under a robust head. Many single-malt whiskey drinkers favor a smaller version of a thistle, but without a stem.

Last edited by Tim2K4Vert; 05-13-2010 at 09:30 PM.
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Old 05-13-2010, 09:31 PM
  #47  
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Beer snobbery.

Gotta love it!

Just dump the suds in a glass and drink it, fer Chrissakes.
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Old 05-13-2010, 09:33 PM
  #48  
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Originally Posted by EHS View Post
No Tim, I'm right, and I'm glad you quoted that to prove it.

Nowhere in that quote does it say the glass shape affects the taste of the beer.

I had assumed the OP was looking into whether the taste is affected.

Your quote only deals with the presentation, specifically how the beer foams. As does the rest of that web site article (briefly skimmed). That's of course, if you think Beer Advocate is the authority on all things beer, which it clearly is not. And their reviews of the beers prove it. Now, were you to quote Michael Jackson, that would be different.

But thank you for making a good point, i.e., that the shape does not change the taste.

Scientific studies show that the shape of glassware will impact head development and retention. Why is this important? The foam created by pouring a beer acts as a net for many of the volatiles in a beer. What's a volatile? Compounds that evaporate from beer to create its aroma, such as hop oils, all kinds of yeast fermentation byproducts like alcohol, fusels and fruity esters, spices or other additions. So a glass that promotes a healthy foam head may enhance the trapping of certain volatiles. And as varying levels of head retention and presentation are desired with different styles of beers, different styles of glassware should be used accordingly.
Sure sounds like they are advocating the shape of the glass affects taste to me. Before you say that only affects the "aroma" and not the "taste", next time drink or eat something with your nose held. Not so tasty. Scientific fact that taste buds are affected by smell.

Not trying to start an argument, but I think there's some merit to the claim. 99.999% marketing and beer snob, dry cracker eating after spitting wine out merit. For the other .001%, you and I probably won't taste the difference and that's why I agree for the most part it's all hype.
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Old 05-13-2010, 09:37 PM
  #49  
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I have to admit-the beer in Brussels was better than I could get here and always in the proper glass.
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Old 05-13-2010, 09:38 PM
  #50  
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Originally Posted by Interceptor430 View Post
you put them in the dishwasher?

NEVER do that!

If you have to wash them, use beer soap

better yet, just rinse them and let them drip dry.
I found this article for ya! Can't say that I've ever done this myself though.

'Beer clean' glasses

Oct. 12, 2000

Yes, "Beer Clean" is an actual term in the bar and restaurant industry vocabulary. Nothing ruins the presentation of a beer -- from the head it throws off to the "Belgian lace" that clings to the side of the glass as the beer is consumed -- more than glassware that is not scrupulously clean.

The best way to get an idea of the effects of residue is to drink a glass of milk from a glass you don't intend to use to serve beer. Wash it out a few minutes with hot water (no soap). Now pour a beer. Is that the head you are used to seeing? Does foam continue to cling to the sides of the glass? Probably not like you are used to.

Now wash the glass with soap (well, drink the beer first). Pour another beer. Same problem? Soap film can be just as nasty a villain as other residue. Now wash the glass with baking soda. Pour another beer. (You're starting to like this exercise, right? You don't have to pour a full beer each time.) This one probably looks better.

Not only will residue you're not seeing affect how you beer looks in the glass, but it may also change the taste of that beer. If you find the word "soapy" popping up often in your tasting notes consider giving all your glassware a good scrubbing.

Bars have equipment that costs from hundreds to thousands of dollars just to wash beer glasses. That's a lot of money we all could be spending on beer, so first we suggest having glasses dedicated only to beer -- using a glass for anything else may leave residues that are extremely hard to get rid of. Wash them carefully after each use with very hot water, use detergent rather than soap if more than water is needed, and then consider cleaning them with baking soda.

Let the glasses air dry in a dish rack. If water droplets cling to the glass or if spots show while drying, then the glass is not clean. Wash them again. It's worth the trouble.
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Old 05-13-2010, 09:57 PM
  #51  
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Originally Posted by 7vettes View Post
Where can I get one............
The restaurant supply stores carry them...
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Old 05-14-2010, 12:31 AM
  #52  
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Originally Posted by EHS View Post
But thank you for making a good point, i.e., that the shape does not change the taste.



The glass does not make the beer taste better. I wish it did, cause I would drink Pigface's ****y, cheap *** Sam Smith Oatmeal Stout all the time if I could find this magical glass.
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Old 05-14-2010, 06:48 AM
  #53  
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What the hell is beer soap?
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Old 05-14-2010, 06:33 PM
  #54  
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I dry-rub my beer glass with salt after an extremely thorough cleansing before pouring. If you see bubbles, your glass is NOT clean. Also, you should only use your beer glass(es) for beer, not for milk, water, prune juice, etc.
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Old 05-14-2010, 07:18 PM
  #55  
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Originally Posted by Tim2K4Vert View Post
You didn't actually read the article did you? Try reading the third paragraph again. The foam of the beer acts as a net for the volatiles which are what give the beer it's aroma, which effects [sic] the taste. Try holding your nose while you eat or drink something and it's not the same. Your sense of smell has a great affect on your sense of taste.

Here's another article for you from realbeer.com
Tim,

I can't keep going back and forth with you -- virtually everything you've quoted and cited deals with the perception of aroma and the visual -- not the taste, which is what I was talking about.

Back to basics from grammar school biology -- you have five senses:

1. Sight
2. Hearing
3. Taste
4. Smell
5. Touch

Taste (or gustation) is one of the two main "chemical" senses. Note that taste is not the same as "flavor"; flavor includes the smell of a food as well as its taste.

Virtually this whole thread, and it was just reconfirmed by the OP above, is about #3, and even if it is about flavor, it doesn't make any difference.

All the shape of the glass does for your #4 is allow you to perhaps better experience the aroma -- more of it maybe -- but it won't change the smell of it -- a beer will smell the way it wants to smell.

Guinness in a Guinness glass will smell the same as Guinness in a Peroni glass. It's not all of a sudden going to start smelling like an Italian lager (now that would be something, huh). Capice?

So, let me type it again, the shape of the glass will not affect the taste or smell, or flavor, of the beer. It will still taste like beer and still smell like beer that it is.

That's it for me; enjoy your brew.

BTW -- the term you want to use is "affect" -- not "effect" as you did above.
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Old 05-14-2010, 07:20 PM
  #56  
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Originally Posted by ProfMoriarty View Post
Beer snobbery.

Gotta love it!

Just dump the suds in a glass and drink it, fer Chrissakes.
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Old 05-14-2010, 07:22 PM
  #57  
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Originally Posted by Interceptor430 View Post
... better yet, just rinse them and let them drip dry.
And how do you get rid of the lipstick on the rim?




Disgusting.
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Old 05-14-2010, 07:29 PM
  #58  
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Originally Posted by Dallas Vette View Post
What the hell is beer soap?
try that thing called google
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Old 07-31-2011, 07:23 PM
  #59  
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I listened to a show on the radio and they did a blindfold test. They served the same wines from regular drinking glasses and wine specific glasses and the 4 people down to the last one thought they were drinking different wines. There is definitely a science to all this bs as some put it.

Here's Sam Adams explanation of their glasses:http://www.samueladams.com/enjoy-our...over-form.aspx
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Old 07-31-2011, 08:49 PM
  #60  
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Originally Posted by Mirroredshades View Post
Anybody tried the fancy curvy Sam Adams glasses yet? Do they make a difference?






LOL if you believe this, then let me tell you about multi-thousand dollar boutique stereo cables.

Talk about marketing....
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