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How many Kegerator owners here?

 
Old 02-11-2019, 11:34 PM
  #41  
jefnvk
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I've one had for four years or so. Bought it for like $90 a few weeks after the Superbowl on clearance at the big orange home improvement shop. It was originally a one tap 15 gal unit, I upgraded it to the three tap (two 5gal, one 3 gal) homebrew setup. If you swap out the faucets, do yourself a favor and just drop the cash on the Perlick stainless forward sealing ones. The rear seals are fine if you're a restaurant pouring beer constantly, they gum up real good after a few days of sitting.

Pros for me? I don't like highly carbonated beers, gives me heartburn, I can turn that way down. Plus what everyone else said.
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Old 02-12-2019, 01:34 PM
  #42  
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Originally Posted by ny32182 View Post
Thanks for the input as always.

I don't know what the solution is, but I definitely have the problem. This has actually continued to get worse.


New top end beer line will be on the way shortly.

Not quite sure I'm copying on everything though... if you have no flow control faucet and a short line, the only thing left to do would be reduce your pressure right?
Yes, I would be reducing the pressure dramatically (in your case). You are continuing to pick up more and more carbonation, even though you've thought it was up to the 12psi level. It wasn't. That's way too high imo. I'd be at 9psi max, and possibly lower.

I'm with those folks above who prefer a beer to not be too carbed. Keep in mind, it takes a lot to totally degas a beer. Like, you can't do it overnight at room temp after stirring and shaking. So, no need worrying that it'll go flat.

Most of my beers so far have been ~6% and I think the carb level in this one would be about to my taste if I could keep it in there a little longer. If I drop the pressure it will degas in the keg, right?
It will degas very very slowly. You could shut off the gas, pull the relief and totally eliminate the pressure, and as long as the gaskets stayed sealed, it'll be right back up to 12psi in no time.

If you want to quick-carb a beer you've just kegged, cold crash it and get it down to 31 or 32, now turn the gas on at 30psi and with the keg laying on its side (so as to maximize the surface area exposed to gas), roll it back and forth to get it to absorb co2. Colder is better since cold beer absorbs the co2 faster. That's why it is so happy to degas when it hits a warm spigot or glass. But I'm talking about cold, not frozen. If you do that little trick above, you'll actually hear the hissing sound of gas rushing into the beer. It's REALLY taking in co2. If you do that about 5 minutes or so, you'll have a great start on the beer being carbed.

In any case, what you thought was 12psi of co2, wasn't. It's going to take as long to get the level back down as it did to bring it up. It'll make huge changes if you force it to, like adding at 30psi, but when you're expecting it to equalize with some subtle pressure change, pack a lunch cause it's gonna be a while.
The calculators tell me I need about 10-12ft of line for my beer styles depending on exact tweaks.
Like I say, I gave up on that bs. You're welcome to try it and it's a great learning experience, but you'll probably be coming back to your own trial and error solution for YOUR beers. Lots of what's written is intended for folks buying a keg of Coors light. That' all well and good if you're dealing with commercial brews, but when you're talking about home brews with way more body, and lacing Budweiser could only dream of holding, those beers just don't act the same. Not to mention most data is for 4.5% beers and you're not making many of them. (yet)
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Old 02-12-2019, 01:37 PM
  #43  
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To add, on the flow control faucets... My take on them is if you truly need to restrict the flow enough that they are helpful, the restriction causes so much turbulence that it does precisely what the faucet is intended to fix. They're only good for the very subtle changes in flow, not for attaching 4% and 7% beers to the same regulator. Ymmv.. That's my experience with 4 of em. If I was a baller I'd buy 4 standard ones for my system.
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Old 02-12-2019, 01:59 PM
  #44  
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Ok... sounds good. Tonight then I'll probably purge what is in there and reset it down to 8-9psi and see if there is any change in behavior. If it is already over-carbed for that level, I will see the gauge creep back up to 12, assuming it had now reached equilibrium at 12? Sounds like I might be a long way from reaching equilibrium at a lower pressure now.

The new line coming is 10ft so will probably just attach it at that length and cut it down if ever needed or desired?

I'm sure you've seen this before, but this is the chart I'm currently referencing:

https://www.kegerators.com/carbonation-table/

I guess if ABV is also an important variable, this chart is much more of a guideline than a hard rule... I have an ale, I tend to prefer a healthy amount of carb (at least in light to medium ABV beers), my temp is currently in the high 30s, so that is how I settled on 12psi. Or what reads 12psi on the gauge at least.
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Old 02-12-2019, 02:40 PM
  #45  
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It might just be that your beer retains head better and it's appearing to be overcarbed, but just pouring a little foamy. Like I say, there's lots of variables. ABV affects this just like temp or pressure. Like I was saying earlier, water is really tough to carb up. Beer is not. I've made soda and carbed it at 40psi. BTW, don't use your beer kegs for soda. I'll just say too, I run my temp a lot lower than you. I figure my beer will warm up plenty once it hits the glass, so I run mine at around 32-33. As your chart shows, that affects the pressure quite a bit. But, just look at the chart and it's not hard to see there's LOTS of room for various beers in that list to be at a different spot.

Trial and error, prefaced with a little understanding, and then make a great guess. Ever wonder why so many bars can't get this right? Cause it's not easy.

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Old 02-12-2019, 04:44 PM
  #46  
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Problem solved (at least for one night).
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