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Time to paint the 72

 
Old 04-24-2019, 01:57 PM
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olelucky
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Default Time to paint the 72

I think itís time to paint my 72. Iíve tried to keep up the lacquer, but itís just not shining much any more and starting to get tiny pin holes. Itís not chipping or cracking, just looks tired. Couple of questions, can I block the current lacquer down, use epoxy primer, then bc/cc? Or if I need to completely strip
it, can I just use lacquer thinner to take it down instead of stripper?
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Old 04-24-2019, 09:46 PM
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Dave Tracy
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If you are going to go to all of the work, or pay for it, I would do it right. Strip all of the paint and primer off then paint. The options for painting vary and you will ultimately make a decision. I stripped my '64 to glass, repaired the areas of separation of the bonding seams, gel coat, epoxy primer, build coats, sealer and paint. I used PPG paints. If you are going with a solid color, you may choose not to clear coat, again, lots of opinions. DUB and Porchdog, along with others, have been very helpful with my project. As far as paint removal, you can sand, use razor blades, or stripper. Keep asking your questions and try to enjoy your project.
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Old 04-25-2019, 06:56 PM
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Using lacquer thinner can be done but it can take a lot of it and honestly....I would not do it that way due to I know how to chemically strip one with no ill effects. As stated by Dave...the choice is your on how you want o do it.

Yes you can block it down and seal it and paint it BUT you may or may not have any problems that can show up later. No one can tell you with 100% certainty that you WILL have problems in the paint in the future....but.....chances are you could.


So depending on what you expect for the final end result and its longevity.....the choices on what you use on it and how you do it can effect the outcome.

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Old 04-26-2019, 05:11 AM
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olelucky
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thanks Dave and Dub. I will test on a panel and see what works for me. I'm sure I'll have questions as I go along. Dave, my color is Millie Miglia Red, a solid color. Are you suggesting a single stage as another option?
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Old 04-26-2019, 11:18 AM
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Dave Tracy
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There are as many opinions as there are members on this Forum. I have read where some advice is to clear coat metallics and single stage not to. I painted my '64 Ermine White as a single stage. I did the job myself and did it single stage. The advantage to clear coat apparently is UV protection. My car is going to be mostly garaged so I have little concern about that. Originally, our vintage cars were single stage paints. DUB and Porchdog are very generous with their time in helping us "paint hacks" and are wonderful resources..
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Old 04-26-2019, 05:26 PM
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I have gotten so accustomed to shooting everything in BC/CC I rarely shoot one single stage.

My 'take' on this is regardless if the color is solid or metallic....the clear provides some protection to the actual color. Kind of like that sheet of glass that is on top of your hand carved /inlaid mahogany coffee table. If you spill grape juice on the glass...it can not soak in the wood....and there are several environmental concerns that IF they get on your paint....the clear can stop it from effecting the color.

NOT SAYING that clear is a 100% guarantee....but it helps greatly in that regard.

And it can be a 'double edge sword' also when and if a person has a paint job that is pristine. Having clear (and enough of it) on the car will allow them to polish the paint for years and years and not have any worries on getting the clear so thin that it begins go milk out. BUT...a single stage paint job will allow the actual color to come off each and every time it is being rubbed on. SO...it is important that there is ALSO enough paint on it IF the person who owns the car has OCD and polishes the paint all the time.

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