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Removing bulk of paint with 80 grit on Dewalt orbital sander

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Removing bulk of paint with 80 grit on Dewalt orbital sander

 
Old 05-12-2019, 08:05 PM
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ScottEwine
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Default Removing bulk of paint with 80 grit on Dewalt orbital sander

I have started the paint removal phase on my 73 LS3 conversion project. I am the second owner and at some point in the cars life of the original Daytona yellow got sprayed over with one of those cheesy two-tone 80s paint schemes. I restored and painted a 69 and a 64 ~20 years ago and used paint stripper to get the paint off without any issues. I have subsequently gotten pretty good with an orbital sander and was thinking of removing the top coat of paint with that and razor blades and then using stripper to get off the relatively easy original Daytona yellow. Does anybody see anything wrong with that plan or is there perhaps an easier way?

Scott


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Old 05-12-2019, 09:10 PM
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use paint stripper or the ''razor blade method''

a sander will cut into the body lines,shapes
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Old 05-12-2019, 09:56 PM
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Originally Posted by dmaxx3500 View Post
use paint stripper or the ''razor blade method''

a sander will cut into the body lines,shapes
What if I am very good with the sander and only take it down to the original paint? And since I am going to use stripper eventually either way, what is the preferred brand of stripper to use or ones to avoid?

Thanks, Scott
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Old 05-14-2019, 02:48 PM
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Scott,
There is no paint stripper that is good or safe for corvette bodies. Its how its applied or removed that makes the difference. I prefer the razor blade method for paint removal along with chemical strippers. The chemicals are used where the blades cant reach. I use lacquer thinner to wash the panels after the stripper has had time to blister the paint. If you use chemical strippers DO NOT let the stripper sit on the panel for extended periods.
Looks like you are making some progress with the sander, but it is tedious and will take some time. As others have said you can sand away the lines and reveals of the car if you are not very careful. Best of luck, post up pics of your progress.
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Old 05-14-2019, 06:56 PM
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Scott,

Using the sander with 80 grit is just fine due to I also do it the same way when I get Corvettes in with 4-5 paint jobs on them.

Knowing WHERE to stop sanding is important and I feel you have that covered.

You cannot sand off body lines IF you are WATCHING what you are doing ( which it seems like you are doing). And a D/A sander in the hands of someone who knows how to use it...you can do an a lot with it and not damage the body. It is when people who using it at top speed and have NO CLUE on what they are doing with it is WHEN problems occur.

AS I have mentioned before and have talked to people here on the forum who have used chemical stripper. The MAIN THING is to TEST the chemical stripper and see how it works and JUST KEEP IN MIND that ANY exposed raw body should not have any stripper applied to it FOR AN EXTENDED PERIOD OF TIME. Which is why you test to see what happens. I will allow the chemical to get on raw fiberglass ...BUT I know how long I can let it stay on there. Because no matter what you do....there will be areas when fresh chemical stripper will get on raw fiberglass.

I use Klean Strip AIRCRAFT REMOVER. Not the stuff for fiberglass....but the stout stuff. Because it is like this. When stripping paint off with chemical...if a person understands the process....then using the strongest chemical stripper works better for me due to I know how to use it. Now if a person wants to use the chemical stripper made for fiberglass....because it makes them feel better. have at it....but I do not have time to wait for a weaker stripper to do the job that the stouter stuff will do and YET still not damage the fiberglass. once a person understands the process.....then this philosophy makes total sense and cannot be disputed.

Using automotive grade priming thinner adn rough steel wool works for me. Sometimes I use a red Scotch-brite pad.....but mainly is it rough steel wool. And then I sand blast the nooks and crannies where the chemical cannot get it out easily. The photos below show it.










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Old 05-14-2019, 09:49 PM
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Originally Posted by DUB View Post
Scott,

Using the sander with 80 grit is just fine due to I also do it the same way when I get Corvettes in with 4-5 paint jobs on them.

Knowing WHERE to stop sanding is important and I feel you have that covered.

You cannot sand off body lines IF you are WATCHING what you are doing ( which it seems like you are doing). And a D/A sander in the hands of someone who knows how to use it...you can do an a lot with it and not damage the body. It is when people who using it at top speed and have NO CLUE on what they are doing with it is WHEN problems occur.

AS I have mentioned before and have talked to people here on the forum who have used chemical stripper. The MAIN THING is to TEST the chemical stripper and see how it works and JUST KEEP IN MIND that ANY exposed raw body should not have any stripper applied to it FOR AN EXTENDED PERIOD OF TIME. Which is why you test to see what happens. I will allow the chemical to get on raw fiberglass ...BUT I know how long I can let it stay on there. Because no matter what you do....there will be areas when fresh chemical stripper will get on raw fiberglass.

I use Klean Strip AIRCRAFT REMOVER. Not the stuff for fiberglass....but the stout stuff. Because it is like this. When stripping paint off with chemical...if a person understands the process....then using the strongest chemical stripper works better for me due to I know how to use it. Now if a person wants to use the chemical stripper made for fiberglass....because it makes them feel better. have at it....but I do not have time to wait for a weaker stripper to do the job that the stouter stuff will do and YET still not damage the fiberglass. once a person understands the process.....then this philosophy makes total sense and cannot be disputed.

Using automotive grade priming thinner and rough steel wool works for me. Sometimes I use a red Scotch-brite pad.....but mainly is it rough steel wool. And then I sand blast the nooks and crannies where the chemical cannot get it out easily. The photos below show it.

DUB
DUB,

I was hoping you would reply and be on the same page and it seems that is the case - excellent! As I mentioned I painted at '64 and '69 20+ years ago and they still look great, and I used aircraft stripper on them as well. What I recall is that depending on the type of paint/primer you were stripping, they would behave differently, some would wrinkle up and make a mess, others would melt. Once you got down to the original paint it came off pretty easily, so I was hoping if I got that off with the sander then the stripping would go pretty easily. I used the same method as you, never let it sit to long and cleaned it off with a scotch-brite and acetone or laquer thinner. I have been experimenting with the razor blade method, but cannot go nearly as fast as I can with the Dewalt and 80 grain, but then again I have a lot of time running a sander with my other hobby: http://salanwoodbine.com/

How do you apply the stripper? I seem to remember using a spray bottle to apply it and that was easier than brushing it on.

Thank you for taking the time to reply.

Scott
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Old 05-17-2019, 03:00 PM
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I brush it on and do not brush it back and forth to many times due to it effects the 'skin' that begins to develop on the top layer of the stripper so the chemical can go down and do their job....instead of out gassing.. If you brush it too may times you effect this 'skinning' ability and it can make the stripper not work as effectively as possible.


DO NOT do it in direct sunlight or on days when it is raining IF possible.

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