Notices
Politics, Religion & Controversy Politics | Religion | Controversy (Non-Corvette)

Margaret Sanger, black genocide, and abortion.

 
Old 06-21-2015, 03:37 PM
  #21  
bmans vette
CF Senior Member
Support Corvetteforum!
 
bmans vette's Avatar
 
Member Since: Nov 2006
Location: Athens GA
Posts: 18,573
Thanked 252 Times in 231 Posts
St. Jude Donor '12-'13, '15- '16-'17-'18-'19
Default

Originally Posted by owebo View Post

Next you'll be telling us Rachel Carson was in fact a hero...because the Internet says so.

Weren't you the guy who said DDT was harmless?
And backed the chemical manufacturer guy who said he would drink it to prove it?
But when confronted bailed out.

How is the Everglades doing these days?

bmans vette is offline  
Old 06-21-2015, 06:54 PM
  #22  
owebo
CF Senior Member
 
owebo's Avatar
 
Member Since: Aug 2006
Location: Washigton, DC
Posts: 107,730
Thanked 31 Times in 27 Posts
St. Jude Donor '11, '16
Default

Originally Posted by bmans vette View Post
Weren't you the guy who said DDT was harmless?
And backed the chemical manufacturer guy who said he would drink it to prove it?
But when confronted bailed out.

How is the Everglades doing these days?

Is. Is harmless.
owebo is offline  
Old 06-21-2015, 07:47 PM
  #23  
Walford
CF Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Walford's Avatar
 
Member Since: Dec 2002
Location: Half-drunk. Will travel.
Posts: 64,896
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by owebo View Post
So, she did this altruistic work at her kkk tea clutches with other like minded klan women? Seriously Wally, I am enjoying you regurgatating the sanitized internet history of that monster of a democrat woman, but it makes you look silly.

Next you'll be telling us Rachel Carson was in fact a hero...because the Internet says so.

We are at the second coming of Margaret's work where eugenics will be practiced through genetics, and I fear for society under liberal control with dangers type of thinking.
You find ZERO evidence that Sanger EVER espoused the garbage false-witness sh** that the anti-abortionists claim.

I find mountains of archival documents from libraries all over the country proving she didn't.

You call microfilm in the Library of Congress "sanitized internet history."

You ignore the fact that Margaret "Peggy" Johnson Goldwater worked with Sanger to establish the first birth control clinic in Phoenix in 1937 (three years after she married Barry). Senator Goldwater was always an advocate for birth control.

Prescott Bush served as the treasurer of Planned Parenthood in 1947, and his son, Senator George H. W. Bush wrote in 1970, “I introduced legislation earlier this year which would provide federal funds for research in family planning devices and increased services to people who need them but cannot afford them. We must help our young people become aware of the fact that families can be planned and that there are benefits economically and socially to be derived from small families.” ("George Bush to Mrs. Jim Hunter, Jr., Oct. 23, 1970" [Virginia B. Whitehill Papers, DeGolyer Library, Southern Methodist University].)

Though she was a Socialist as late as the 20s or 30s, Sanger became a registered Republican no later than WWII, and campaigned for her old friend Barry Goldwater in 1964.

But, you will ignore these FACTS that can be found in LIBRARIES all over the country, because you saw a picture on facebook that said Sanger wanted to kill black babies.




And by the way, Sanger claimed (there is no outside verification of her story) to have spoken to the Klan ONE TIME, and she described the event as terrifying. The ONLY source you have to claim that Sanger ever spoke to the Klan IS SANGER HERSELF, you blind bat!
Walford is offline  
Old 06-21-2015, 08:06 PM
  #24  
vigalante
CF Senior Member
 
Member Since: May 2011
Posts: 34,674
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Walford View Post
You find ZERO evidence that Sanger EVER espoused the garbage false-witness sh** that the anti-abortionists claim.

I find mountains of archival documents from libraries all over the country proving she didn't.

You call microfilm in the Library of Congress "sanitized internet history."

You ignore the fact that Margaret "Peggy" Johnson Goldwater worked with Sanger to establish the first birth control clinic in Phoenix in 1937 (three years after she married Barry). Senator Goldwater was always an advocate for birth control.

Prescott Bush served as the treasurer of Planned Parenthood in 1947, and his son, Senator George H. W. Bush wrote in 1970, I introduced legislation earlier this year which would provide federal funds for research in family planning devices and increased services to people who need them but cannot afford them. We must help our young people become aware of the fact that families can be planned and that there are benefits economically and socially to be derived from small families. ("George Bush to Mrs. Jim Hunter, Jr., Oct. 23, 1970" [Virginia B. Whitehill Papers, DeGolyer Library, Southern Methodist University].)

Though she was a Socialist as late as the 20s or 30s, Sanger became a registered Republican no later than WWII, and campaigned for her old friend Barry Goldwater in 1964.

But, you will ignore these FACTS that can be found in LIBRARIES all over the country, because you saw a picture on facebook that said Sanger wanted to kill black babies.




And by the way, Sanger claimed (there is no outside verification of her story) to have spoken to the Klan ONE TIME, and she described the event as terrifying. The ONLY source you have to claim that Sanger ever spoke to the Klan IS SANGER HERSELF, you blind bat!
Even YOU stated ONE TIME talk to the KKK.... All that was necessary!
vigalante is offline  
Old 06-21-2015, 08:17 PM
  #25  
vigalante
CF Senior Member
 
Member Since: May 2011
Posts: 34,674
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Margaret Sanger on Her Speech the Ku Klux Klan
http://margaretsanger.blogspot.com/ ^

Posted on ‎12‎/‎3‎/‎2004‎ ‎11‎:‎06‎:‎39‎ ‎PM by Diago

Sanger's account of her talk to the Ku Klux Klan

Given Margaret Sanger's preoccupation with race (see previous article), it should come as no surprise to anyone that Sanger would accept an invitation to give a speech to an organization that also has a preoccupation with race - the Ku Klux Klan. Not only did Sanger accept the invitation, but the excerpt below from her own 1938 autobiography indicates the she got along quite well with members of a New Jersey branch of the Ku Klux Klan, eventually getting a "dozen invitations to speak to similar groups."

Perhaps this is because the KKK's ideas and Margaret Sanger's ideas concerning race are so similar. No doubt the KKK must have been happy with Sanger's "Negro Project" which was designed to cut down on the number of black babies being born. In a December 10, 1939 letter, Margaret Sanger wrote to Dr. Clarence Gamble about her "Negro Project," saying, "We do not want the word to go out that we want to exterminate the Negro population and the minister is the man who can straighten that idea out if it ever occurs to any of their more rebellious members." (See Blessed Are The Barren The Social Policy of Planned Parenthood by Robert Marshall and Charles Donovan, Ignatius Press, 1991, pages 17-18.)

Here is Sanger's account of her trip to talk to the Ku Klux Klan from pages 366-367 of Margaret Sanger An Autobiography (1971 reprint by Dover Publications, Inc. of the 1938 original published by W.W. Norton & Company).

All the world over, in Penang and Skagway, in El Paso and Helsingfors, I have found women's psychology in the matter of childbearing essentially the same, no matter what the class, religion, or economic status. Always to me any aroused group was a good group, and therefore I accepted an invitation to talk to the women's branch of the Ku Klux Klan at Silver Lake, New Jersey, one of the weirdest experiences I had in lecturing.

My letter of instruction told me what train to take, to walk from the station two blocks straight ahead, then two to the left. I would see a sedan parked in front of a restaurant. If I wished I could have ten minutes for a cup of coffee or bite to eat, because no supper would be served later.

I obeyed orders implicitly, walked the blocks, saw the car, found the restaurant, went in and ordered some cocoa, stayed my allotted ten minutes, then approached the car hesitatingly and spoke to the driver. I received no reply. She might have been totally deaf as far as I was 1 concerned. Mustering up my courage, I climbed in and settled back. Without a turn of the head, a smile, or a word to let me know I was right, she stepped on the self-starter. For fifteen minutes we wound around the streets. It must have been towards six in the afternoon. We took this lonely lane and that through the woods, and an hour later pulled up in a vacant space near a body of water beside a large, unpainted, barnish building.

My driver got out, talked with several other women, then said to me severely, "Wait here. We will come for you." She disappeared. More cars buzzed up the dusty road into the parking place. Occasionally men dropped wives who walked hurriedly and silently within. This went on mystically until night closed down and I was alone in the dark. A few gleams came through ****** in the window curtains. Even though it was May, I grew chillier and chillier.

After three hours I was summoned at last and entered a bright corridor filled with wraps. As someone came out of the hall I saw through the door dim figures parading with banners and illuminated crosses. I waited another twenty minutes. It was warmer and I did not mind so much. Eventually the lights were switched on, the audience seated itself, and I was escorted to the platform, was introduced, and began to speak.

Never before had I looked into a sea of faces like these. I was sure that if I uttered one word, such as abortion, outside the usual vocabulary of these women they would go off into hysteria. And so my address that night had to be in the most elementary terms, as though I were trying to make children understand.

In the end, through simple illustrations I believed I had accomplished my purpose. A dozen invitations to speak to similar groups were proffered. The conversation went on and on, and when we were finally through it was too late to return to New York. Under a curfew law everything in Silver Lake shut at nine o'clock. I could not even send a telegram to let my family know whether I had been thrown in the river or was being held incommunicado. It was nearly one before I reached Trenton, and I spent the night in a hotel.
vigalante is offline  
Old 06-21-2015, 08:27 PM
  #26  
Walford
CF Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Walford's Avatar
 
Member Since: Dec 2002
Location: Half-drunk. Will travel.
Posts: 64,896
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by vigalante View Post
Even YOU stated ONE TIME talk to the KKK.... All that was necessary!
And there ya have it.

She spoke one time to the Klan, clearly hated the experienced and thought they were idiots ("Never before had I looked into a sea of faces like these. I was sure that if I uttered one word, such as abortion, outside the usual vocabulary of these women they would go off into hysteria. And so my address that night had to be in the most elementary terms, as though I were trying to make children understand."). The whole experience put her in fear for her life ("I could not even send a telegram to let my family know whether I had been thrown in the river or was being held incommunicado.").

And you think she suddenly became some kind of grand dragoness?


By the way, I don't know whether the Silver Lake she went to was the one in Essex County or the one in Warren County, but you can be guaranteed that the women Sanger spoke to were Republican wives.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warren..._and_elections
Warren County has been a consistently conservative county in local, state, and national elections, with a 3 to 1 ratio of Republican:Democratic voters. The county is also home to a large non-partisan (independent) factor. This stems from its earliest days.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Politi...1965_Elections
1926-1965 Elections[edit]
Until 1965, Essex County had one State Senator, elected in countywide elections:

1927-1935: Joseph G. Wolber (Republican), Elected 1926. Re-elected 1929 and 1932. Did not seek re-election in 1935 following his appointment as a New Jersey Circuit Court Judge.

1936-1938: Lester H. Clee (Republican), Elected 1935. Republican nominee for Governor of New Jersey, 1937. Did not seek re-election in 1938.

1939-1941: Homer C. Zink (Republican), Elected 1938. Elected by the Legislature to serve as New Jersey State Controller in 1941.

1942-1947: Roy V. Wright (Republican), Elected 1941. Re-elected 1944. Did not seek re-election in 1947.

1948-53: Alfred C. Clapp (Republican), Elected 1947. Re-elected 1951. Resigned in 1953 to become a Superior Court Judge.

1953-55: Marc Anton (Republican), Elected 1953 (Special Election). Defeated for re-election, 1955.

1956-64: Donal C. Fox (Democrat), Elected 1955. Re-elected 1959. Did not seek re-election, 1963.

1964-66: C. Robert Sarcone (Republican). Elected 1963. Defeated for re-election, 1965.
Walford is offline  
Old 06-21-2015, 09:07 PM
  #27  
krackenvette
CF Senior Member
 
krackenvette's Avatar
 
Member Since: Jan 2012
Location: charleston south carolina
Posts: 5,706
Thanked 54 Times in 14 Posts
Default

Eugenics. Racist. Abortionist..Whatever.
She is the founder of a program that uses my money to terminate life. If it is so damn important, than whoever wants to support it needs to pay. Not me.
Get rid of the program planned parenthood. Thats my opinion and what I believe should be done.
As part of her efforts to promote birth control, Sanger found common cause with proponents of eugenics, believing that they both sought to "assist the race toward the elimination of the unfit."[84] Sanger was a proponent of negative eugenics, which aims to improve human hereditary traits through social intervention by reducing the reproduction of those who were considered unfit.[85] In “The Morality of Birth Control,” a 1921 speech, she divided society into three groups: the educated and informed class that regulated the size of their families, the intelligent and responsible who desired to control their families however did not have the means or the knowledge and the irresponsible and reckless people whose religious scruples "prevent their exercising control over their numbers.” Sanger concludes “there is no doubt in the minds of all thinking people that the procreation of this group should be stopped.”[86] Sanger's eugenic policies included an exclusionary immigration policy, free access to birth control methods and full family planning autonomy for the able-minded, and compulsory segregation or sterilization for the profoundly retarded.[87][88] In her book The Pivot of Civilization, she advocated coercion to prevent the "undeniably feeble-minded" from procreating.[89] Although Sanger supported negative eugenics, she asserted that eugenics alone was not sufficient, and that birth control was essential to achieve her goals.[90][91][92]

In contrast with eugenicist William Robinson, who advocated euthanasia for the unfit,[note 8] Sanger wrote, "we [do not] believe that the community could or should send to the lethal chamber the defective progeny resulting from irresponsible and unintelligent breeding."[93] Similarly, Sanger denounced the aggressive and lethal **** eugenics program.[88] In addition, Sanger believed the responsibility for birth control should remain in the hands of able-minded individual parents rather than the state, and that self-determining motherhood was the only unshakable foundation for racial betterment.[90][94]

Sanger also supported restrictive immigration policies. In "A Plan for Peace", a 1932 essay, she proposed a congressional department to address population problems. She also recommended that immigration exclude those "whose condition is known to be detrimental to the stamina of the race," and that sterilization and segregation be applied to those with incurable, hereditary disabilities.[87][88][95]
Race
W. E. B. Du Bois served on the board of Sanger's Harlem clinic.[96]

Sanger's writings echoed ideas about inferiority and loose morals of particular races that were widespread in the contemporary United States.[85] In one "What Every Girl Should Know" commentary, she references popular opinion that Aboriginal Australians were "just a step higher than the chimpanzee" with "little sexual control," as compared to the "normal man and Woman."[78] Elsewhere she bemoaned that traditional sexual ethics "... have in the past revealed their woeful inability to prevent the sexual and racial chaos into which the world has today drifted."[94]

Such attitudes did not keep her from collaborating with African-American leaders and professionals who saw a need for birth control in their communities. In 1929, James H. Hubert, a black social worker and leader of New York's Urban League, asked Sanger to open a clinic in Harlem.[97] Sanger secured funding from the Julius Rosenwald Fund and opened the clinic, staffed with black doctors, in 1930. The clinic was directed by a 15-member advisory board consisting of black doctors, nurses, clergy, journalists, and social workers. The clinic was publicized in the African-American press and in black churches, and it received the approval of W. E. B. Du Bois, founder of the NAACP.[98] In 1939 Sanger wrote, "We should hire three or four colored ministers, preferably with social-service backgrounds, and with engaging personalities. The most successful educational approach to the Negro is through a religious appeal. We don’t want the word to go out that we want to exterminate the Negro population, and the minister is the man who can straighten out that idea if it ever occurs to any of their more rebellious members." She did not tolerate bigotry among her staff, nor would she tolerate any refusal to work within interracial projects.[99] Sanger's work with minorities earned praise from Martin Luther King, Jr., in his 1966 acceptance speech for the Margaret Sanger award.[100]

From 1939 to 1942 Sanger was an honorary delegate of the Birth Control Federation of America, which included a supervisory role—alongside Mary Lasker and Clarence Gamble—in the Negro Project, an effort to deliver birth control to poor black people.[101] Sanger wanted the Negro Project to include black ministers in leadership roles, but other supervisors did not. To emphasize the benefits of involving black community leaders, she wrote to Gamble "we do not want word to go out that we want to exterminate the Negro population and the minister is the man who can straighten out that idea if it ever occurs to any of their more rebellious members." This quote has been cited by Angela Davis to support her claims that Sanger wanted to exterminate black people.[102] However, New York University's Margaret Sanger Papers Project, argues that in writing that letter, "Sanger recognized that elements within the black community might mistakenly associate the Negro Project with racist sterilization campaigns in the Jim Crow South, unless clergy and other community leaders spread the word that the Project had a humanitarian aim."

Last edited by krackenvette; 06-21-2015 at 09:14 PM.
krackenvette is offline  
Old 06-21-2015, 09:11 PM
  #28  
vigalante
CF Senior Member
 
Member Since: May 2011
Posts: 34,674
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Walford View Post
And there ya have it.

She spoke one time to the Klan, clearly hated the experienced and thought they were idiots ("Never before had I looked into a sea of faces like these. I was sure that if I uttered one word, such as abortion, outside the usual vocabulary of these women they would go off into hysteria. And so my address that night had to be in the most elementary terms, as though I were trying to make children understand."). The whole experience put her in fear for her life ("I could not even send a telegram to let my family know whether I had been thrown in the river or was being held incommunicado.").

And you think she suddenly became some kind of grand dragoness?


By the way, I don't know whether the Silver Lake she went to was the one in Essex County or the one in Warren County, but you can be guaranteed that the women Sanger spoke to were Republican wives.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warren..._and_elections

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Politi...1965_Elections
In 1922 an Republican attached to the KKK would have been handled the same way blacks were.... Come on, even you knew this! How many times have we had the discussion that Southern Democrats left the Democrat party because of the Civil Right Act, which Democrats voted against!
vigalante is offline  
Old 06-21-2015, 09:18 PM
  #29  
jcharity
CF Senior Member
 
jcharity's Avatar
 
Member Since: Feb 2004
Location: Metro Detroit
Posts: 25,413
Thanked 11 Times in 6 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by vigalante View Post
In 1922 an Republican attached to the KKK would have been handled the same way blacks were.... Come on, even you knew this! How many times have we had the discussion that Southern Democrats left the Democrat party because of the Civil Right Act, which Democrats voted against!
Democrats did not vote against the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Barry Goldwater, a republican, opposed it.
Johnson, a democrat, got 94% of the black vote. A republican, Goldwater, opposed the Civil Rights act which you state democrats voted against, which is false.
jcharity is offline  
Old 06-21-2015, 09:22 PM
  #30  
vigalante
CF Senior Member
 
Member Since: May 2011
Posts: 34,674
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by jcharity View Post
Democrats did not vote against the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Barry Goldwater, a republican, opposed it.
Johnson, a democrat, got 94% of the black vote. A republican, Goldwater, opposed the Civil Rights act which you state democrats voted against, which is false.
The original House version:[20]
Democratic Party: 152–96 (61–39%)
Republican Party: 138–34 (80–20%)

Cloture in the Senate:[21]
Democratic Party: 44–23 (66–34%)
Republican Party: 27–6 (82–18%)

The Senate version:[20]
Democratic Party: 46–21 (69–31%)
Republican Party: 27–6 (82–18%)

The Senate version, voted on by the House:[20]
Democratic Party: 153–91 (63–37%)
Republican Party: 136–35 (80–20%)

By % the Democrats who had vast control of the Congress voted LESS for the Act than Republicans. Perhaps I should have stated it this way.
vigalante is offline  
Old 06-21-2015, 10:12 PM
  #31  
owebo
CF Senior Member
 
owebo's Avatar
 
Member Since: Aug 2006
Location: Washigton, DC
Posts: 107,730
Thanked 31 Times in 27 Posts
St. Jude Donor '11, '16
Default

Originally Posted by Walford View Post
You find ZERO evidence that Sanger EVER espoused the garbage false-witness sh** that the anti-abortionists claim.

I find mountains of archival documents from libraries all over the country proving she didn't.

You call microfilm in the Library of Congress "sanitized internet history."

You ignore the fact that Margaret "Peggy" Johnson I]Goldwater[/I]worked with Sanger to establish the first birth control clinic in Phoenix in 1937 (three years after she married Barry). Senator Goldwater was always an advocate for birth control.

Prescott Bush served as the treasurer of Planned Parenthood in 1947, and his son, Senator George H. W. Bush wrote in 1970, I introduced legislation earlier this year which would provide federal funds for research in family planning devices and increased services to people who need them but cannot afford them. We must help our young people become aware of the fact that families can be planned and that there are benefits economically and socially to be derived from small families. ("George Bush to Mrs. Jim Hunter, Jr., Oct. 23, 1970" [Virginia B. Whitehill Papers, DeGolyer Library, Southern Methodist University].)[/B]

Though she was a Socialist as late as the 20s or 30s, Sanger became a registered Republican no later than WWII, and campaigned for her old friend Barry Goldwater in 1964.

But, you will ignore these FACTS that can be found in LIBRARIES all over the country, because you saw a picture on facebook that said Sanger wanted to kill black babies.




And by the way, Sanger claimed (there is no outside verification of her story) to have spoken to the Klan ONE TIME, and she described the event as terrifying. The ONLY source you have to claim that Sanger ever spoke to the Klan IS SANGER HERSELF, you blind bat![/B]
I don't ignore the facts....
owebo is offline  
Old 06-21-2015, 10:17 PM
  #32  
Walford
CF Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Walford's Avatar
 
Member Since: Dec 2002
Location: Half-drunk. Will travel.
Posts: 64,896
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by vigalante View Post
In 1922 an Republican attached to the KKK would have been handled the same way blacks were....
You know this how?

The Republican party was never as closely tied to the Klan as the Democrats were, of course, but in northern states, Klans tended to lean pretty heavily Republican.

Wikipedia reference-linkEdward L. Jackson, Governor of Indiana, was probably the highest-ranking open member of the Klan in the Republican party.

That's right. He was Governor of Indiana, AND a member of the Klan, AT THE SAME TIME, and everybody knew it.
Walford is offline  
Old 06-21-2015, 10:22 PM
  #33  
owebo
CF Senior Member
 
owebo's Avatar
 
Member Since: Aug 2006
Location: Washigton, DC
Posts: 107,730
Thanked 31 Times in 27 Posts
St. Jude Donor '11, '16
Default

Originally Posted by jcharity View Post
Democrats did not vote against the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Barry Goldwater, a republican, opposed it.
Johnson, a democrat, got 94% of the black vote. A republican, Goldwater, opposed the Civil Rights act which you state democrats voted against, which is false.
Even algores father voted against it. Goldwater was not against the civil rights aspect of the law, was something else in it he voted against...
owebo is offline  
Old 06-21-2015, 11:27 PM
  #34  
DSOMC6
CF Senior Member
 
DSOMC6's Avatar
 
Member Since: Dec 2005
Location: SO CA
Posts: 5,869
Thanks: 0
Thanked 5 Times in 4 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by jcharity View Post
Democrats did not vote against the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Barry Goldwater, a republican, opposed it.
Johnson, a democrat, got 94% of the black vote. A republican, Goldwater, opposed the Civil Rights act which you state democrats voted against, which is false.

Let's go back a little further in history:

Origins of Jim Crow laws

During the Reconstruction period of 18651877, federal law provided civil rights protection in the U.S. South for freedmen, the African Americans who had formerly been slaves, and former free blacks. In the 1870s, Democrats gradually regained power in the Southern legislatures, having used insurgent paramilitary groups, such as the White League and Red Shirts, to disrupt Republican organizing, run Republican officeholders out of town, and intimidate blacks to suppress their voting. Extensive voter fraud was also used. Gubernatorial elections were close and had been disputed in Louisiana for years, with increasing violence against blacks during campaigns from 1868 onward. In 1877, a national Democratic Party compromise to gain Southern support in the presidential election resulted in the government's withdrawing the last of the federal troops from the South. White Democrats had regained political power in every Southern state.[3] These Southern, white, Democratic Redeemer governments legislated Jim Crow laws, officially segregating black people from the white population.

Blacks were still elected to local offices through the 1880s, but the establishment Democrats were passing laws to make voter registration and electoral rules more restrictive, with the result that political participation by most blacks and many poor whites began to decrease.[4][5] Between 1890 and 1910, ten of the eleven former Confederate states, starting with Mississippi, passed new constitutions or amendments that effectively disenfranchised most blacks and tens of thousands of poor whites through a combination of poll taxes, literacy and comprehension tests, and residency and record-keeping requirements.[4][5] Grandfather clauses temporarily permitted some illiterate whites to vote but gave no relief to most blacks.

Voter turnout dropped drastically through the South as a result of such measures. In Louisiana, by 1900, black voters were reduced to 5,320 on the rolls, although they comprised the majority of the state's population. By 1910, only 730 blacks were registered, less than 0.5 percent of eligible black men. "In 27 of the state's 60 parishes, not a single black voter was registered any longer; in 9 more parishes, only one black voter was."[6] The cumulative effect in North Carolina meant that black voters were completely eliminated from voter rolls during the period from 18961904. The growth of their thriving middle class was slowed. In North Carolina and other Southern states, there were also the effects of invisibility: "[W]ithin a decade of disfranchisement, the white supremacy campaign had erased the image of the black middle class from the minds of white North Carolinians."[6] Alabama had tens of thousands of poor whites disenfranchised.[7]

Those who could not vote were not eligible to serve on juries and could not run for local offices. They effectively disappeared from political life, as they could not influence the state legislatures, and their interests were overlooked. While public schools had been established by Reconstruction legislatures for the first time in most Southern states; those for black children were consistently underfunded compared to schools for white children, even when considered within the strained finances of the postwar South where the decreasing price of cotton kept the agricultural economy at a low.

Like schools, Jim Crow public libraries were underfunded and often stocked with secondhand books and other resources.[8] These facilities were not introduced for African Americans in the South until the first decade of the twentieth century.[9] Throughout Jim Crow, the libraries were only available sporadically.[10] Prior to the twentieth century, most libraries established for African Americans were school-library combinations.[10] Many public libraries for both white and African American patrons at this period were founded as the result of middle-class activism aided by matching grants from the Carnegie Foundation.[10]

In some cases, progressive measures intended to reduce election fraud, such as the Eight Box Law in South Carolina, acted against black and white voters who were illiterate, as they could not follow the directions.[11] While the separation of African Americans from the general population was becoming legalized and formalized during the Progressive Era (1890s1920s), it was also becoming customary. For instance, even in cases in which Jim Crow laws did not expressly forbid black people to participate in sports or recreation, a segregated culture had become common.[1]

In the Jim Crow context, the presidential election of 1912 was steeply slanted against the interests of black Americans. Most blacks still lived in the South, where they had been effectively disfranchised, so they could not vote at all. While poll taxes and literacy requirements banned many poor or illiterate Americans from voting, these stipulations frequently had loopholes that exempted white Americans from meeting the requirements. In Oklahoma, for instance, anyone qualified to vote before 1866, or related to someone qualified to vote before 1866 (a kind of "grandfather clause"), was exempted from the literacy requirement; the only persons who could vote before that year were white male Americans. White Americans were effectively excluded from the literacy testing, whereas black Americans were effectively singled out by the law.

Woodrow Wilson was a Democrat elected from New Jersey, but he was the first Southern-born president of the post-Civil War period. He appointed Southerners to his Cabinet. Some quickly began to press for segregated work places, although Washington, D.C. and federal offices had been integrated since after the Civil War. In 1913, for instance, the Secretary of the Treasury William Gibbs McAdoo an appointee of the President was heard to express his opinion of black and white women working together in one government office: "I feel sure that this must go against the grain of the white women. Is there any reason why the white women should not have only white women working across from them on the machines?"[13]

Wilson introduced segregation in federal offices, despite much protest from African-American leaders and groups. He appointed segregationist Southern politicians because of his own firm belief that racial segregation was in the best interest of black and white Americans alike.[14] At Gettysburg on July 4, 1913, the semi-centennial of Abraham Lincoln's declaration that "all men are created equal", Wilson addressed the crowd:

How complete the union has become and how dear to all of us, how unquestioned, how benign and majestic, as state after state has been added to this, our great family of free men![15]


Early attempts to break Jim Crow


The Civil Rights Act of 1875, introduced by Charles Sumner and Benjamin F. Butler, stipulated a guarantee that everyone, regardless of race, color, or previous condition of servitude, was entitled to the same treatment in public accommodations, such as inns, public transportation, theaters, and other places of recreation. This Act had little effect.[16] An 1883 Supreme Court decision ruled that the act was unconstitutional in some respects, saying Congress was not afforded control over private persons or corporations. With white southern Democrats forming a solid voting bloc in Congress, due to having outsize power from keeping seats apportioned for the total population in the South (although hundreds of thousands had been disenfranchised), Congress did not pass another civil rights law until 1957.

In 1887, Rev. W. H. Heard lodged a complaint with the Interstate Commerce Commission against the Georgia Railroad company for discrimination, citing its provision of different cars for white and black/colored passengers. The company successfully appealed for relief on the grounds it offered separate but equal accommodation.[17]

In 1890, Louisiana passed a law requiring separate accommodations for colored and white passengers on railroads. Louisiana law distinguished between "white", "black" and "colored" (that is, people of mixed European and African ancestry). The law already specified that blacks could not ride with white people, but colored people could ride with whites before 1890. A group of concerned black, colored and white citizens in New Orleans formed an association dedicated to rescinding the law. The group persuaded Homer Plessy, who was one-eighth "Negro" and of fair complexion, to test it.

In 1892, Plessy bought a first-class ticket from New Orleans on the East Louisiana Railway. Once he had boarded the train, he informed the train conductor of his racial lineage and took a seat in the whites-only car. He was directed to leave that car and sit instead in the "coloreds only" car. Plessy refused and was immediately arrested. The Citizens Committee of New Orleans fought the case all the way to the Supreme Court. They lost in Plessy v. Ferguson (1896), in which the Court ruled that "separate but equal" facilities were constitutional. The finding contributed to 58 more years of legalized discrimination against black and colored people in the United States.

In 1908 Congress defeated an attempt to introduce segregated streetcars into the capital.[18]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jim_Crow_laws
DSOMC6 is offline  
Old 06-22-2015, 12:27 AM
  #35  
vigalante
CF Senior Member
 
Member Since: May 2011
Posts: 34,674
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Walford View Post
You know this how?

The Republican party was never as closely tied to the Klan as the Democrats were, of course, but in northern states, Klans tended to lean pretty heavily Republican.

Wikipedia reference-linkEdward L. Jackson, Governor of Indiana, was probably the highest-ranking open member of the Klan in the Republican party.

That's right. He was Governor of Indiana, AND a member of the Klan, AT THE SAME TIME, and everybody knew it.
And EVERYONE KNOWS that the KKK was founded and was fostered by SOUTHERN DEMOCRATS!



We even CELEBRATED a distinguished member of Congress into the 21st Century that was a KKK member!



Can you deny this?
vigalante is offline  
Old 06-22-2015, 02:03 AM
  #36  
bmans vette
CF Senior Member
Support Corvetteforum!
 
bmans vette's Avatar
 
Member Since: Nov 2006
Location: Athens GA
Posts: 18,573
Thanked 252 Times in 231 Posts
St. Jude Donor '12-'13, '15- '16-'17-'18-'19
Default

Originally Posted by vigalante View Post
Even YOU stated ONE TIME talk to the KKK.... All that was necessary!
How many politicians have talked at Bob Jones University?
Talking to a specific group does not mean that you embrace "their" ideology.
It means you are there to try and give them another viewpoint.

Can you not see that possibility?
Its not like Sanger went on a speaking tour promoting the Klan.

Come on, think!
bmans vette is offline  
Old 06-22-2015, 06:53 AM
  #37  
krackenvette
CF Senior Member
 
krackenvette's Avatar
 
Member Since: Jan 2012
Location: charleston south carolina
Posts: 5,706
Thanked 54 Times in 14 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by vigalante View Post
And EVERYONE KNOWS that the KKK was founded and was fostered by SOUTHERN DEMOCRATS!



We even CELEBRATED a distinguished member of Congress into the 21st Century that was a KKK member!



Can you deny this?
They will. They will sprinkle unicorn horn dust on it and blow it away..
krackenvette is offline  
Old 06-22-2015, 07:01 AM
  #38  
owebo
CF Senior Member
 
owebo's Avatar
 
Member Since: Aug 2006
Location: Washigton, DC
Posts: 107,730
Thanked 31 Times in 27 Posts
St. Jude Donor '11, '16
Default

Originally Posted by bmans vette View Post
How many politicians have talked at Bob Jones University?
Talking to a specific group does not mean that you embrace "their" ideology.
It means you are there to try and give them another viewpoint.

Can you not see that possibility?
Its not like Sanger went on a speaking tour promoting the Klan.

Come on, think!
It was the kkk....

Indeed...Come on, think....
owebo is offline  
Old 06-22-2015, 07:37 AM
  #39  
Walford
CF Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Walford's Avatar
 
Member Since: Dec 2002
Location: Half-drunk. Will travel.
Posts: 64,896
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by vigalante View Post
And EVERYONE KNOWS that the KKK was founded and was fostered by SOUTHERN DEMOCRATS!
Well, Sanger was a Republican, so, put that in your pipe and smoke it.
Walford is offline  
Old 06-22-2015, 07:38 AM
  #40  
owebo
CF Senior Member
 
owebo's Avatar
 
Member Since: Aug 2006
Location: Washigton, DC
Posts: 107,730
Thanked 31 Times in 27 Posts
St. Jude Donor '11, '16
Default

Originally Posted by Walford View Post
Well, Sanger was a Republican, so, put that in your pipe and smoke it.
Hitlery adores her....
owebo is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Quick Reply: Margaret Sanger, black genocide, and abortion.


Sponsored Ads
Vendor Directory

Contact Us - About Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

© 2019 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.
 
  • Ask a Question
    Get answers from community experts
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: