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Beta males - Millennial dads have pathetic DIY skills

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Beta males - Millennial dads have pathetic DIY skills

 
Old 06-11-2019, 03:25 PM
  #121  
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Originally Posted by owebo View Post
Youíre in my thread triggered little snowflake....
And your next step is in your mouth lol
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Old 06-11-2019, 03:28 PM
  #122  
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Originally Posted by Millenium Z06 View Post
I have a pressure bleeder that I use in tandem with my air compressor powered vacuum bleeder.
Vacuum bleeding actually does a better job than pressure bleeding, I only use the motive pressure bleeder to keep the MC reservoir full.
I kind of wondered. I've always just used a cheapo vacuum bleeder myself. Thought about a Motive, but haven't pulled the trigger on it.
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Old 06-11-2019, 04:16 PM
  #123  
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Originally Posted by DB Cooper View Post
I kind of wondered. I've always just used a cheapo vacuum bleeder myself. Thought about a Motive, but haven't pulled the trigger on it.

It's a good tool and not too expensive on Amazon, it's the multiple vehicle billet adapters that run the cost up.
The plastic caps/adapters are worthless
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Old 06-11-2019, 04:16 PM
  #124  
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I'm a self-employed contractor and work with about a dozen or so other contractors on a daily basis. As contractors we have no benefits, so our hourly rates are significantly higher than most salaried employees' effective hourly rates. Every hour we're not working we're not billing, and that eats into our bottom line. It's very easy for us to get into the mindset "it's cheaper to pay someone $x / hour to do something and for me to just work those hours instead."

When we bought our house in 2008 we were coming from paying $1650 / mo for a lackluster 1 bd / 1 bth apartment in a crime-infested area. Because of that, we got a little carried away and bought more house and more land than we really needed, and more than we were prepared to take care of properly. Our backyard is just large enough to reasonably justify owning and using a riding mower. My coworkers make fun of me for doing my own yard-work, but to me there's something gratifying about taking care of and maintaining your own property, including the land you live on. Of course for serious problems we'll call out electricians, plumbers, and what not, but it's good to have a general understanding of how things work and how to fix common problems. Yesterday after work I fixed our side-gate using my drill, some shims, and a couple of screws and washers. The day prior to that I replaced our broken faucet on our kitchen sink using wrenches, a screwdriver, and some elbow grease. Today after work I'm replacing the turn indicator light on my Trans Am and hopefully driving it through GM's driving cycle so I can finally get it smogged and eventually finally registered again. Two weekends ago I replaced the secondary AIR injection pump. The repair shop had quoted me $800 for parts and labor. I paid $190 for the pump and saved myself hundreds in labor.

It's easy for these things to seem like annoyances and, I won't lie, the temptation to just pay somebody to make these problems go away is there. These are opportunities to learn, to be resourceful and innovative, to improve your problem-solving and troubleshooting skills. The destination matters, yes, but so does the journey. What would I be doing instead of doing all these things? Pounding keys on a keyboard staring at a screen, the same thing I do all day every day at work. I enjoy the feeling of self-reliance, being reminded there's more to life than just the internet and programming and playing computer games, that there is a real, tangible, and often beautiful world out there.
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Old 06-11-2019, 04:46 PM
  #125  
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Originally Posted by Millenium Z06 View Post
And your next step is in your mouth lol
Maybe you can try DIY English next....
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Old 06-11-2019, 06:27 PM
  #126  
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Originally Posted by Millenium Z06 View Post
Thats not all thats in there
Never said it was. So why not add to the list rather than just critically say "that's not all"?
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Old 06-11-2019, 07:41 PM
  #127  
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The fact that in OT there are longer threads at times about someone getting a new camry than about sports cars is pretty sad too. Even more so to me than those that cannot fix things.
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Old 06-12-2019, 08:01 AM
  #128  
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Originally Posted by Z Factor View Post
I bet many liberals or younger people reading the CF assume we were all born with silver spoons in our mouths because we are now financially comfortable.
I had a few friends like that from wealthy families, but I came from a middle class working family with old school values. We had one TV, two older cars and only went on a vacation once every couple of years (nothing extravagant).
My parents saved to send me to good schools, and my Dad drove an old Buick Skylark with no A/C in south Florida, with an AM radio.
When I wanted something (other than my B-Day or Christmas) I had to work part time to earn money to buy it. That taught me a lot and instilled good values, not having everything given to me.
I think the whole idea of "middle class" has changed in the US over the last 50 years. It sounds like we had a similar upbringing, except I went to public schools. Parents driving old clapped out cars, wearing mostly hand-me-downs, making food selections based on what was cheap, a vacation was 3 days at the Jersey shore every 2-3 years etc., and IMO, we were middle class. Middle class mostly because of what we didn't do that poor people did, like I never missed a meal, I always had a warm coat in the winter (I might have been the third or fourth kid to wear that coat, but I had it) etc. I describe it as "the only thing we didn't have was luxury". I think all age groups today expect at least some level of luxury to feel they are middle class.

Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
Millenials don't even own homes for the most part, so of course you are not going to see them in home improvement stores in the same % and if ownership was similar, they have less $ and less interest because they often aren't settled down yet.
I got a call from one of my tenants (28 year old guy) a few weeks ago. A bunch of electrical stuff in his apartment wasn't working. I had to show him where his breaker panel is, explain what breakers were, and show him how to reset the one that tripped. He looked at me like he had seen a magic trick. I won't be surprised when he calls again with a similar problem.

Yeah, I could sit around and get annoyed by that kind of crap, and occasionally I do. But most times I just realize that it's nothing more than job security.
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Old 06-12-2019, 08:08 AM
  #129  
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Originally Posted by Derrick Reynolds View Post
I think the whole idea of "middle class" has changed in the US over the last 50 years. It sounds like we had a similar upbringing, except I went to public schools. Parents driving old clapped out cars, wearing mostly hand-me-downs, making food selections based on what was cheap, a vacation was 3 days at the Jersey shore every 2-3 years etc., and IMO, we were middle class. Middle class mostly because of what we didn't do that poor people did, like I never missed a meal, I always had a warm coat in the winter (I might have been the third or fourth kid to wear that coat, but I had it) etc. I describe it as "the only thing we didn't have was luxury". I think all age groups today expect at least some level of luxury to feel they are middle class.



I got a call from one of my tenants (28 year old guy) a few weeks ago. A bunch of electrical stuff in his apartment wasn't working. I had to show him where his breaker panel is, explain what breakers were, and show him how to reset the one that tripped. He looked at me like he had seen a magic trick. I won't be surprised when he calls again with a similar problem.

Yeah, I could sit around and get annoyed by that kind of crap, and occasionally I do. But most times I just realize that it's nothing more than job security.
Haha Ö that's a good way to put it.
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Old 06-12-2019, 11:28 AM
  #130  
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Originally Posted by owebo View Post
Maybe you can try DIY English next....
Why snowball, everyone including you understood.
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Old 06-12-2019, 11:33 AM
  #131  
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So his name is really BetA O'Rourke?
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Old 06-12-2019, 11:37 AM
  #132  
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This is why Lowe's has a whole series of DIY Basics:

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Old 06-12-2019, 11:39 AM
  #133  
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Originally Posted by Derrick Reynolds View Post
I think the whole idea of "middle class" has changed in the US over the last 50 years. It sounds like we had a similar upbringing, except I went to public schools. Parents driving old clapped out cars, wearing mostly hand-me-downs, making food selections based on what was cheap, a vacation was 3 days at the Jersey shore every 2-3 years etc., and IMO, we were middle class. Middle class mostly because of what we didn't do that poor people did, like I never missed a meal, I always had a warm coat in the winter (I might have been the third or fourth kid to wear that coat, but I had it) etc. I describe it as "the only thing we didn't have was luxury". I think all age groups today expect at least some level of luxury to feel they are middle class.



I got a call from one of my tenants (28 year old guy) a few weeks ago. A bunch of electrical stuff in his apartment wasn't working. I had to show him where his breaker panel is, explain what breakers were, and show him how to reset the one that tripped. He looked at me like he had seen a magic trick. I won't be surprised when he calls again with a similar problem.

Yeah, I could sit around and get annoyed by that kind of crap, and occasionally I do. But most times I just realize that it's nothing more than job security.
I had an identical call from a tenant about 15 years ago when I owned rental property, exact same response.
A week later he called and said the toilet wouldn't stop running. I told him to shake the handle... when it stopped he was shocked, I hung up amazed at the stupidity in people.

A few years ago, I got an service request from an office I supported who had a problem with their answering machine; it diisplayed the same 800 number regardless of who called.
I looked at the machine and thought they were pranking me, they were not and called the machine to show me. I had the office manager and the assistant come look at the machine with me as I pulled of the clear static label with the manufacturers 800 number

It's not just millennials and like you said, job security
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Old 06-12-2019, 12:18 PM
  #134  
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Originally Posted by Derrick Reynolds View Post
I think the whole idea of "middle class" has changed in the US over the last 50 years. It sounds like we had a similar upbringing, except I went to public schools. Parents driving old clapped out cars, wearing mostly hand-me-downs, making food selections based on what was cheap, a vacation was 3 days at the Jersey shore every 2-3 years etc., and IMO, we were middle class. Middle class mostly because of what we didn't do that poor people did, like I never missed a meal, I always had a warm coat in the winter (I might have been the third or fourth kid to wear that coat, but I had it) etc. I describe it as "the only thing we didn't have was luxury". I think all age groups today expect at least some level of luxury to feel they are middle class.



One of the reasons is being impatient because few want to wait and save anymore, they just have impulses and consume beyond their means. I was brought up never to use a CC because of all the interest you pay. When I finally did get a CC to be able to rent a car and such, I got an American Express that had to be paid off completely every month. I also got a Sears card, but rarely used it or carried a balance.
Today I mostly use CC for bills and the like to earn cash back or gain sky-miles. But what people forget is that if you carry balances, those sky-miles or cash back is a losing game. Needless to say it is a lure, because many people apparently buy all sorts of stuff they cannot afford and just pay the monthly minimum. In the long run they pay a small fortune in interest, yet they will drive halfway across town to save $5 on a toaster.

I think being impatient is a millennial learned habit from others. For example kids will not listen to an entire song, just a portion then are off to the next one. I asked a millennial why they kept changing the songs before they were finished (they liked the song) and the reply was they want to sample songs, but not waste time listening to the whole song.
I remember when you would listen to the radio and get annoyed if they cut or faded the end of a song, even by a few notes. Today some millennials only make it through half the song before they are on to the next.
So I doubt they have the desire to watch their Dads or neighbors take the time to fix something. After all they would be missing out on the next text, tweet, or posting on FB about one of their imaginary millions of friends, talking about their latest bowel movement.
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Old 06-12-2019, 04:04 PM
  #135  
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Originally Posted by Z Factor View Post


One of the reasons is being impatient because few want to wait and save anymore, they just have impulses and consume beyond their means. I was brought up never to use a CC because of all the interest you pay. When I finally did get a CC to be able to rent a car and such, I got an American Express that had to be paid off completely every month. I also got a Sears card, but rarely used it or carried a balance.
Today I mostly use CC for bills and the like to earn cash back or gain sky-miles. But what people forget is that if you carry balances, those sky-miles or cash back is a losing game. Needless to say it is a lure, because many people apparently buy all sorts of stuff they cannot afford and just pay the monthly minimum. In the long run they pay a small fortune in interest, yet they will drive halfway across town to save $5 on a toaster.

I think being impatient is a millennial learned habit from others. For example kids will not listen to an entire song, just a portion then are off to the next one. I asked a millennial why they kept changing the songs before they were finished (they liked the song) and the reply was they want to sample songs, but not waste time listening to the whole song.
I remember when you would listen to the radio and get annoyed if they cut or faded the end of a song, even by a few notes. Today some millennials only make it through half the song before they are on to the next.
So I doubt they have the desire to watch their Dads or neighbors take the time to fix something. After all they would be missing out on the next text, tweet, or posting on FB about one of their imaginary millions of friends, talking about their latest bowel movement.
Very well stated. I have lived as you have, and it has worked out very well. Also your observations of the limited attention spans and instant gratification of today's generation seems to be spot-on. Hell, I can't even watch the new movies and TV shows....they are edited so quickly from scene to scene it's like staring at a strobe light. Glad I grew up when I did and glad I still don't have a 'smart' phone. I'd rather read a book or watch a sunset. Or listen to an entire side of an old LP......
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Old 06-13-2019, 07:06 AM
  #136  
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Old 06-13-2019, 07:29 AM
  #137  
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I did much of the minor repair work around my home as well as the weekly gardening/mowing on a large property for many years. Eventually, I realized I could make more playing lawyer than mowing the lawn or use the same time, typically on a weekend, spending the time with my family. Paying someone to do the work was the best decision I ever made.

Both of my Millenial kids have graduate engineering degrees and MD's and are very capable with tools when they have the time.
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Old 06-13-2019, 09:14 AM
  #138  
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Originally Posted by vette6799 View Post
I did much of the minor repair work around my home as well as the weekly gardening/mowing on a large property for many years. Eventually, I realized I could make more playing lawyer than mowing the lawn or use the same time, typically on a weekend, spending the time with my family. Paying someone to do the work was the best decision I ever made.

Both of my Millenial kids have graduate engineering degrees and MD's and are very capable with tools when they have the time.
I tried that but hated it. What's the point of owning things if you're always too busy working and having to pay somebody to take care of them. At a certain point, it's like... are you going to pay somebody to service your wife as well?
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Old 06-13-2019, 09:17 AM
  #139  
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Originally Posted by vette6799 View Post
I did much of the minor repair work around my home as well as the weekly gardening/mowing on a large property for many years. Eventually, I realized I could make more playing lawyer than mowing the lawn or use the same time, typically on a weekend, spending the time with my family. Paying someone to do the work was the best decision I ever made.

Both of my Millenial kids have graduate engineering degrees and MD's and are very capable with tools when they have the time.

The economic concept of opportunity costs comes to mind.

Unfortunately, as someone who can't sit still, I'm much happier 'doing stuff', including building a new deck, finishing my basement, rebuilding a motorcycle, etc. then paying someone else to do it; fortunately, my wife is sufficiently agreeable to these endeavors.
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Old 06-13-2019, 11:12 AM
  #140  
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Originally Posted by Vitoc View Post
I tried that but hated it. What's the point of owning things if you're always too busy working and having to pay somebody to take care of them. At a certain point, it's like... are you going to pay somebody to service your wife as well?
Your humorous analogy aside (yes, I chuckled a little ), paying for services to free up some of your time is more of a testament to hard work than mowing your own lawn or building your own deck. It speaks to how wealth distribution/creation is more along educational lines than it ever has been. Itís a contributing factor to the service industry growing out of pace with manufacturing, mining, and other industries that require manual labor with little to no education. Being a auto mechanic requires far more technical skill than it did 20 or 30 years ago.

The simple fact of the matter is that the younger generation might be less skilled or less inclined to do DIY, but they are far and away more adept in working with technology than older generations (on average, not individually). Itís almost laughable to criticize 20 and 30 something people for doing less DIY than the people who raised them. Wouldnít that be the older generationís fault?

I admire people who can wrench their own cars and appliances and there is a cathartic joy in doing your own yard or building your own deck, but a man has to know his limitations and not everyone can or should do certain things themselves. That was the same in 1959 as it is today.
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