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13 Year Old Tires With Low Mileage - Safe?

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Old 02-28-2008, 10:43 AM
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NittanyLionDen
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Default 13 Year Old Tires With Low Mileage - Safe?

I recently purchased a 1995 Coupe with 12,000 miles on it. The tires are original. Is it safe to drive at high speeds in excess of 100 mph on these tires or should I replace them just to be safe. Visually, they look fine, but I'm not an expert. Any opinions or practical experiences are appreciated. Thanks.
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Old 02-28-2008, 12:05 PM
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leadfoot4
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safe?? NO!!
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Old 02-28-2008, 04:35 PM
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NO,NOhttps://www.corvetteforum.com/forums/images/smilies/iagree.gif
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Old 02-28-2008, 05:36 PM
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Biggie G
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yep...definatly not...even if they look nice and pretty...dont ride on them....I wouldnt even keep them for spares....they will bust imediatly after hiting a pothole or simular.....
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Old 02-29-2008, 08:29 AM
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remove them, and put them in bags and put them away. you will be suprised in 10 or 15 years what they will be worth if they just hold air.

When I was getting my 87 GN ready for concours judging, I was looking for 4 perfect Eagle GT tires that are no longer maid and it cost me over a grand to get 4 that were nice and 4 that were ok and none of them were anything you would want to drive around on. just simply for the judges. the NCRS people will be looking for those tires soon enough.
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Old 03-01-2008, 08:25 AM
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Better replace the tires. I might be next to you when you're careening out of control. Plus you're wife's not going to be happy when the car goes airborne. Then she won't let you get the new vette or C-5 you've been talking about.

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Old 03-02-2008, 08:04 AM
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Default Tires

Originally Posted by NittanyLionDen View Post
I recently purchased a 1995 Coupe with 12,000 miles on it. The tires are original. Is it safe to drive at high speeds in excess of 100 mph on these tires or should I replace them just to be safe. Visually, they look fine, but I'm not an expert. Any opinions or practical experiences are appreciated. Thanks.
If these are the original tires I think they stopped making them soon after the 1996 Vette was out. I would replace them but hold on to these tires if they are the originals.
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Old 03-04-2008, 07:21 AM
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Tire manufacturers suggest replacing tires after 6 years even the ones with no wear.
I like the suggestion to save them for Concours events. Or sell them to someone who does Concours.
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Old 03-04-2008, 03:57 PM
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No No & No.
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Old 03-04-2008, 10:33 PM
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Originally Posted by NittanyLionDen View Post
Is it safe to drive at high speeds in excess of 100 mph on these tires
Your answer >> No.

How do I know >> Look up my occupation in my profile.
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Old 03-06-2008, 03:45 PM
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Tire Aging

Nothing Lasts Forever...and Tires Are No Exception

In the 1970s, bias ply tires wore out in about 15,000 miles during two years of service. In the 1980s, early radial ply tires wore out in about 40,000 miles during four years of service. And by the turn of the century, radial tires lasting 60,000 to 80,000 miles were providing four or more years of service on vehicles averaging about 15,000 miles per year. In all of these examples, the tire treads "wore out" before the rest of the tire "aged out."

However, not all of today's vehicles average15,000 miles per year. Multiple-vehicle families, occasionally used recreational vehicles and vehicles driven only for pleasure are driven fewer miles per year. Additionally, enthusiast vehicles trailered to events, shows, stored or put on display for extended periods of time put on far fewer miles. It's possible to encounter ten-year-old tires with significant remaining tread depth because they've been driven less than 1,000 miles a year!

Unfortunately, the growing realization that tires are perishable means that the tires on some of these vehicles will actually "age out" before they "wear out."

How long will tires last before aging out? The U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and tire manufacturers are currently studying the many variables. Heavily loaded tires only driven occasionally in scorching climates face some of the most severe conditions, while lightly loaded tires driven every day in moderate climates experience the least severe. Add to that the amount of exposure to the elements (sun and atmospheric) and the quality of tire and vehicle maintenance practices (proper inflation pressure, wheel alignment, etc) and you have an idea of the complexity of the situation. While tire life will ultimately depend on the tires' service conditions and the environment in which they operate, the difficult task remains how to confirm and quantify it.

The current industry association recommendations regarding inspecting and replacing tires due to age originate outside the United States.

The British Rubber Manufacturers Association (BRMA) recommended practice issued June, 2001, states "BRMA members strongly recommend that unused tyres should not be put into service if they are over six years old and that all tyres should be replaced ten years from the date of their manufacture."

Environmental conditions like exposure to sunlight and coastal climates, as well as poor storage and infrequent use, accelerate the aging process. In ideal conditions, a tyre may have a life expectancy that exceeds ten years from its date of manufacture. However, such conditions are rare. Aging may not exhibit any external indications and, since there is no non-destructive test to assess the serviceability of a tyre, even an inspection carried out by a tyre expert may not reveal the extent of any deterioration."

More recently, The Japan Automobile Tire Manufacturers Association (JATMA) recommended practice issued May, 2005, states "customers are encouraged to have their vehicle tires promptly inspected after five years of use to determine if the tires can continue to be used (recommends spare tires be inspected as well). Furthermore, even when the tires look usable, it is recommended that all tires (including spare tires) that were made more than ten years ago be replaced with new tires. Additionally, because in some cases automobile makers—based on the characteristics of the relevant vehicle—stipulate in the owner's manual the timing of tire inspection and replacement. Please read and confirm the content of the owner's manual."

Several European vehicle manufacturers of high performance sports cars, coupes and sedans identify that "under no circumstances should tires older than 6 years be used" in their vehicle owner's manual. However, it should be noted that European recommendations must include driving conditions that include roads like the German Autobahn, which allows vehicles to be legally driven at their top speeds for extended periods of time.

While American driving conditions don't include the high-speed challenges of the German Autobahn, the U.S. divisions of DaimlerChrysler and Ford Motor Company joined their European colleagues in 2005 by recommending the tires installed as Original Equipment be replaced after six years of service. (General Motors declined to offer a recommendation until a more scientific analysis of driving conditions and tire aging could be completed).

Because many of the tires The Tire Rack offers are manufactured in Europe or Asia, it's common for us to receive new tires direct from the manufacturers that are six to nine months old. Additionally there are some instances where the tire manufacturer's minimum run quantities will produce enough tires to meet a few years of consumer demand for lower volume types and sizes. In these cases the tires we receive directly from the manufacturer may already be several years old. Finally, when we work with a tire manufacturer to help them clear a discontinued tire line out their distribution centers, this clearance frequently uncovers some new tires that are older. These tires are typically offered at a significant discount and will most likely be worn out within their useful lifespan. Since we rotate our inventory, most of the tires we ship are less than a year or two old.

It is also important to note that the more aggressive the tires' tread compound, the shorter its life. DOT-legal competition tires would have the shortest shelf live before the aging process would begin to diminish their performance. Sometimes the tires that were just right at the end of this season will be too aged to be fully effective the next year. Max Performance and Ultra High Performance tires would be next, and so on down the line.

Our experience has been that when properly cared for, most street tires have a useful life of between six to ten years. And while part of that time is spent as the tire travels from the manufacturing plant to the manufacturer's distribution center, to the retailer and to you, the remainder is the time it spends on your vehicle.
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Old 03-06-2008, 06:24 PM
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Originally Posted by ZO6 Lee View Post
Tire manufacturers suggest replacing tires after 6 years even the ones with no wear.
I like the suggestion to save them for Concours events. Or sell them to someone who does Concours.
Z06 Lee...

I cant read anything past your avatar.

Is there a bigger version... or a non-cropped photo that may allow me to move on and try and remember what this post was about?
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Old 04-03-2008, 06:22 AM
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Originally Posted by [email protected] View Post



The British Rubber Manufacturers Association (BRMA) recommended practice issued June, 2001, states "BRMA members strongly recommend that unused tyres should not be put into service if they are over six years old and that all tyres should be replaced ten years from the date of their manufacture."




Several European vehicle manufacturers of high performance sports cars, coupes and sedans identify that "under no circumstances should tires older than 6 years be used" in their vehicle owner's manual. However, it should be noted that European recommendations must include driving conditions that include roads like the German Autobahn, which allows vehicles to be legally driven at their top speeds for extended periods of time.

While American driving conditions don't include the high-speed challenges of the German Autobahn, the U.S. divisions of DaimlerChrysler and Ford Motor Company joined their European colleagues in 2005 by recommending the tires installed as Original Equipment be replaced after six years of service. (General Motors declined to offer a recommendation until a more scientific analysis of driving conditions and tire aging could be completed).


thanks for this info, luke. it's exactly what i was looking for. i do have some questions for you, though.

say i bought 2 sets of new front tires. i would use one set now and it would last me a couple of years.

how and where is the best place to store the other pair? should they be wrapped in plastic or left out? should they be stored on their sides or on the tread? should they be in a cool place or can they be stored in an attic?

thanks for your help.
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Old 04-03-2008, 08:30 AM
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Storing Tires

Since heat and exposure to the elements are the important factors that influence a tire's aging process, drivers can prolong their tire's life by minimizing their impact. Here are some tips for storing tires that will not be used continuously.

• Don't store a vehicle with weight on its tires for extended periods of time. Long-term inactivity is more harmful to tires than weekly drives that flex the tires and help maintain oil dispersion within the rubber compounds.

• Keep the tires out of direct sunlight whenever possible. The sun's ultraviolet rays and radiant heat are detrimental to rubber. We have used a pyrometer to measure tires that were simply sitting in direct sunlight on a parked vehicle. Surprisingly those tires' temperatures measured 135° Fahrenheit on their surface.

• Before storing, use a tire brush to clean each tire with soap and water to remove brake dust, dirt and grime. If the tires are still mounted on wheels, use a wheel brush to clean the wheels with an approved cleaner as well. Dry with a towel and let any remaining moisture thoroughly evaporate.

DO NOT APPLY ANY TIRE DRESSINGS. Tire compounds are formulated to resist ozone cracking or weather checking.

• Place each clean and dry tire in its own large, opaque, airtight plastic bag (such as lawn and garden bags) for storing. Avoid allowing any moisture to remain and remove as much air as practical (some drivers even use a vacuum cleaner to draw out as much as possible). Close the bag tightly and tape it shut. This places the tire in its own personal mini-atmosphere to help reduce oil evaporation.

• While Seasonal Tire Totes make it neater to store tires, easier to carry tires and reduce the possibility of depositing brake dust, dirt and grime in the trunk or on the back seat during transportation, Seasonal Tire Totes are not airtight nor designed to prevent exposure to the atmosphere. The recommended solution would be to place each clean each tire and wheel into the airtight plastic bag and then cover the sealed bag with a Tire Tote.

• If you choose not to store white letter/white stripe tires in plastic bags, it is important they be stored or stacked white-to-white and black-to-black to prevent staining the white rubber. The black rubber used on the tires' white letter/white stripe side is compounded differently then the black rubber used on the opposite side. A layer of non-staining black rubber covers the white rubber on the tire's white side to prevent oils in the tire from migrating into the exposed white rubber and discoloring it, however the black sidewall uses standard rubber. Stacking all tires white sidewall up will allow the oils from each tire's black sidewall to migrate into the white rubber of the tire below it.

• Place the tires in a cool, dry location. It is better to store tires in a dry basement or climate-controlled workshop than in a standard garage, storage shed, hot attic or outdoors. While basement and shop surroundings tend to remain cool and dry, conditions found in typical garage, shed, attic and outdoor locations often include a wide range of hot and cold temperatures, as well as seasonal precipitation and humidity.

• Keep the tires away from sources of ozone. Electric motors that use contact brushes generate ozone. Keep your tires away from the furnace, sump pump, etc.

While tires will age somewhat regardless of what precautions are taken, these procedures will help slow the process compared to taking no precautions at all.
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Old 04-04-2008, 01:16 AM
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awesome, thanks again luke.
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Old 04-25-2008, 03:31 PM
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Old 05-16-2008, 11:21 PM
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Originally Posted by JBACE View Post
Your answer >> No.

How do I know >> Look up my occupation in my profile.

Okay so your the guy to blame for the 4 kids I have LOL
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Old 07-06-2008, 09:00 AM
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Replaced the original 9+ year old rears yesterday although they had only 29K miles. I am going up to Carlisle in August (1400 mile trip) and was afraid of dry rot catching up to them.
Peace of mind and safety for $700.......cheap price to pay.
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Old 07-20-2008, 12:07 PM
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I believe in the sunlight factor. If the car was keep mostly garaged, then they will last way longer than 6 years.

If the car is an outside daily driver, then 6 years is enough.

Certainly the tire companys can't control how your car is stored or used, so they say 6 years no matter what.

maybe someone has information to prove me wrong, and I would be very interested in hearing it.
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Old 07-20-2008, 05:34 PM
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Originally Posted by the blur View Post
I believe in the sunlight factor. If the car was keep mostly garaged, then they will last way longer than 6 years.

If the car is an outside daily driver, then 6 years is enough.

Certainly the tire companys can't control how your car is stored or used, so they say 6 years no matter what.

maybe someone has information to prove me wrong, and I would be very interested in hearing it.
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