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New Garage build, please advise.

 
Old 04-14-2019, 08:28 PM
  #41  
dplotkin
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Originally Posted by playzwithcars View Post
When I built my garage, the cost for radiant heat was expensive, not really mainstream, not a lot of information for a DIYer and no one could answer the question how long the pipes would last before they needed replacement due to corrosion or other issues (pinhole leaks) in a slab. In my eyes, a leak is not a question of if, it is a question of when..
My response is intended to be helpful to others considering new garage construction:
Radiant heat for new construction is not significantly more expensive than forced hot air and is as main stream as any other form of heat having been used since the 1950's.Today under-slab radiant heat is done using black PEX plastic tubing with an unlimited lifespan. A domestic water heater and a circulator can be employed rather than a wall mounted boiler where codes allow; as the water need only be 110 degrees. It can be left set at 60 and the boiler will run only once in a while, the slab acting as a heat sink. It keeps car bottoms and floors dry, and backs warm. It doesn't blow dust around and It costs far less to operate. Certainly one can prefer a hot-dog unit heater, but the preference does not make it a better choice. I had a garage with a hot-dog for years, I now know the difference. Before you go with other heating methods, discuss radiant heat with your plumbing & heating contractor.

Dan




Last edited by dplotkin; 04-14-2019 at 08:28 PM.
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Old 04-15-2019, 06:48 AM
  #42  
Drothgeb
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I like the feel of a heated slab, and it works well when heated continuously. But, if you in a colder climate and you only heat it occasionally, then forced air works much better. As some of the others, I keep my storage garages in the 40s during the winter. Raising it to the 60s only takes a 1/2 hr with forced air.

I was was looking at you slab prep, and it doesn’t look like there’s any insulation under your slab?
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Old 04-15-2019, 07:16 AM
  #43  
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Originally Posted by halfprice5 View Post
I'm using a mini split for heat and cooling. It works very well down to 0f. Only take 30 min or so in extreme cold to heat the garage.

Also did air/240/120 every 4 feet, concrete work bench 11/2 story and scissors trusses they give you approx 1/3 the span open in the center of the truss. spray in foam insulation

Didn't put a bath ans shower, wish I had.
How cold does it get where you are? I have a second home in the NH lakes region and want to heat my 2 car garage. I'm insulating it right now and I'm thinking of going with a mini split for the garage and the room above that is a finished bunk room. It can get pretty cold up there in the winter, -5 with wind chill to -20. I don't need it to be 70 but if I could get it in the 50's I'd be happy.

Last edited by biggd; 04-15-2019 at 07:17 AM.
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Old 04-15-2019, 08:51 AM
  #44  
dplotkin
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Originally Posted by Drothgeb View Post
I like the feel of a heated slab, and it works well when heated continuously. But, if you in a colder climate and you only heat it occasionally, then forced air works much better. As some of the others, I keep my storage garages in the 40s during the winter. Raising it to the 60s only takes a 1/2 hr with forced air.
I was was looking at you slab prep, and it doesn’t look like there’s any insulation under your slab?
I have no idea what you are looking at or thinking. Under the mesh with tubing (the white stuff) is a blanket of moisture barrier, insulation and foil, all designed specifically for this application. It is easily self-installed.

It costs me about $125 a month to keep my 40' X 40' garage heated to a constant 65 degrees. While it takes 3-4 hours to bring it up to 65 from stone cold, there is no reason on earth to do that. Once it gets cold, I set it to 65. Once the thermostat is satisfied it shuts off the hot water but the temperature continues to climb, to about 67, and stays there for most of the day. The thermostat may not call again until that night. The slab holds the heat...even when the door going up and down that slab stays warm and continues to warm the objects in the room and the air.

The Hot Dog must cycle constantly, it only warms the air, much of it goes outside when the door opens. It makes noise, dust and uses far more fuel.

I concede that a Hot Dog will warm up a cold garage quickly, but what is the value in sudden temperature changes that generate moisture through condensation? In a house at the NH lakes, Tuftonboro, Wolfeboro, wherever you are up there in that spectacular part of the world in a garage you use infrequently I agree a Hot Dog is probably sufficient.

However, for those in cold climates who spend a lot of time working in a garage and/or who want to control temp and humidity cost effectively and have the most comfortable garage in the world, fit for a king, go radiant.

ps. I don't sell the stuff. I fought with my builder and myself over this. I nearly put a big 'ol Hot Dog in my once in a lifetime garage. After 3 years with my radiant heated epoxy floor garage I have never been happier about an agonizing decision as I am about this, and why I'm vociferous about making sure the claims made about it are accurate.

Dan

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Old 04-15-2019, 12:36 PM
  #45  
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We get a few sub zero days in southern Ohio, I have a small 12k btu cool 13.5k heat it will produce full heat to zero. SEER is 24. They not produce units with 30 SEER

My 12k is hardly a blip on the electric bill and it runs 24/7 to keep the humidity down.
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Old 04-15-2019, 12:58 PM
  #46  
BLUE1972
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I did baseboard = it works well and can heat the shop in 2 hours. I keep it at 40 degrees and can warm to 65.

I realized it was ok the second year when I started doing a lot of work in the shop.

The concrete floor stays cold and takes a ling time to get warm. I put in ceiling fans to help heat up the floor.
When you get older standing on a cold floor will give you foot cramps, even though the shop is 65 degrees.

When we did my friends shop we did radiant , in floor heat - PECKS.. It takes a little longer to heat up the shop but the warm floor makes a huge difference. You can work in a cooler temp without feeling the coolness.

We both keep the shops at 40degrees in the winter - it can get to 0 degrees here. I found that 40 degrees stops the paint and other items from getting damaged.

I would definitely recommend in floor heat , PECKS or radiant heat. If done right both (radiant and baseboard) are explosion proof - which is what you want with cars that have gas in them.
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Old 04-15-2019, 05:08 PM
  #47  
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This is not the unit I used but is better than mine

https://www.greecomfort.com/our-products/crown-plus-2/ will heat to -22
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