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New LED headlights

Old 12-16-2018, 08:22 PM
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FAUEE
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Default New LED headlights

I previously had some of the generic led headlights with like 15 LEDs in the housing. They were better than the stock bulbs, but were clearly just spotlights, they had no beam pattern or cutoff at all. One started being flakey, so I decided it was time to upgrade.

I bought a set of what I assume are blatant ripoffs of a more expensive light from amazon for 90 bucks. Put them in today and what can I say other than WOW. These are great, super bright with a great cutoff. The beam is wide, and casts a good long bit, and the high beams are killer. They installed easily enough, they are a tight fit in the back, but they do fit.

These are what I bought.
2018 New Osram 110W 5x7 Led Headlights 7x6 Led Sealed Beam Headlamp with High Low Beam H6054 6054 Led Headlight for Jeep Wrangler YJ Cherokee XJ H5054 H6054LL 6052 6053(2Pcs) https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07BWBRDJ5/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_nUUfCb37C97EW

If anyone needs some headlights, these are great, and have me wishing my truck had headlights this good.
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Old 12-16-2018, 09:49 PM
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Osram makes good stuff. $90 for the pair!?
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Old 12-16-2018, 10:26 PM
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Yeah, 90 for the pair. Really a good deal.

They are DEFINITELY not made by osram. They come in a plain black box, with a poor english note about a harness they come with.
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Old 12-16-2018, 10:46 PM
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Ah, well that makes sense. Still though, for the price, you can't go wrong.
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Old 12-16-2018, 10:59 PM
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How annoying are they to ofher drivers?

you said a good cutoff so im assuming you mean they arent blinding (on lo beam)
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Old 12-16-2018, 11:44 PM
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I mean, if you look right at them, they are bright. But as long as you dont look into the sun, they probably wont blind you oncoming.

I cant seem to upload the cutoff pictures, but it's quite flat of a cutoff. I think some of the amazon reviews show it.
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Old 12-17-2018, 03:25 AM
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Still have these on my Amazon wishlist - Since the Vette is so low hopefully the cutoff isn't blinding to oncoming traffic, with my lifted truck just about any angle is blinding
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Old 12-17-2018, 07:51 AM
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Iíll second that those are excellent lights. I have that same set from amazon and have been very impressed. I put them in back in August, and have not had anyone flash me yet for them being too bright. I also drove behind my wife one night with them on and she said they were fine in her rear view.
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Old 12-17-2018, 08:38 AM
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For those unfamiliar with LED headlights - i.e.,specifically designed to be used on the highway (DOT approved/type accepted), will deflect or focus the (LO) beam down away from the eyes of on-coming drivers. And, in the case of (so-called) projector LED headlights, the division between the illuminated and un-illuminated portion of the beam is quite sharp (read: not fuzzy); i.e., the "drive line". Google LED headlights for many examples of lights intended for highway use and you'll see many examples (aka) "drive line".

Once installed, it is critical that the headlights be aimed to avoid blinding on-coming traffic! There are several methods and even specially designed headlight aiming jigs to rough them in. But, whichever method you use to initially aim the lights, the best way to check to see if they're aimed correctly is on a deserted street while sitting in the drivers seat w/ approx half tank of gas. The edge of the LO beam intersects the level road surface at about 100-150 yards ahead. (Mine I set at ~ 150 which seems to work well [I don't get "flashed" by on-coming cars, but can still see the road far enough to avoid most hazards]).
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Old 12-17-2018, 09:59 AM
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Originally Posted by FAUEE View Post
I mean, if you look right at them, they are bright. But as long as you dont look into the sun, they probably wont blind you oncoming.

I cant seem to upload the cutoff pictures, but it's quite flat of a cutoff. I think some of the amazon reviews show it.
Is this the picture you're looking for?



It's hard to judge entirely from that picture, but based on that pic and some of the other pictures, I wouldn't have these lights on my own vehicles.

They are somewhat "less bad" than many of the other offerings on Amazon, but they don't look legal to me, and I'm not sure they would be your safest choice either.

There is a bit of a "bump" across the top of the cutoff. That's pretty much required by the US DOT specs. On the pic, it looks a little bright. If you aim using the top of that lump as the cutoff point, you'll have the lights aimed way too low. If you aim with the broader cutoff line as the beam center line, then that lump will be annoying to oncoming traffic. That lump is there to light up signs, and you can see in the bigger pic in that image how much it lights up the speed limit sign down the street.

But that's not the biggest safety issue for you. There's those two "drips" or "fangs" hanging down below the center of the beam. That puts a lot of foreground light on the road. The effect of that on your eyes is that they see bright light close to the car, and your pupils constrict, and when that happens, your distance vision disappears into darkness. Personally, I've witnessed two different single car accidents where cars with LED headlights have struck fixed objects that they should have seen, but didn't see because of the dangerous beam pattern of their (aftermarket) LED headlights. One of those accidents, I was in the passenger seat when the vehicle struck a fallen tree that was across the road. I won't ride in cars with dangerous headlights any more. I've also seen a disproportionate number of LED "conversion" headlights in the yards at local body shops around here, usually with front end damage.

There are some round headlamps that look a lot like that which are sold by Harley Davidson for their motorcycles, and actually are DOT compliant, and are legal for use on motorcycles on public roads. Even those have a different set of specifications and regulations because motorcycles only have a single headlamp.

DOT compliant headlamps will have at least three markings on the lens. There must be a manufacturer's mark in the center of the lens, either the name in print or the manufacturer's trademark. There must be the letters DOT on the face of the lens (SAE is also allowed if the lamp meets SAE specifications), and there must be a bulb type designator (2B1 is the designator for H6054 and related 5x7 rectangular sealed beam lights).

Anyone claiming the headlamps they are selling are "(US) DOT Approved" is lying to you about their product. In the United States, lighting manufacturers self certify that their lights comply with DOT safety regulations, including the beam pattern. They indicate compliance by placing the three required markings that I mentioned.

Oh, and that Chinese toy also has a bogus European marking on the lens. Proper European lights have even higher requirements, and depending on the country they do the certification in, they actually do test performance of the lamps in either Government laboratories or in private labs licensed by the government. The lamp in the picture has one of the markings indicating it's been certified in Germany, but is missing several other required markings, and there's no way it passes TUV testing with the pattern shown in that picture. Also, Germans generally require 3 different versions of any lamp, with different angles between the high beam and low beam centers, because TUV regulations specify three different aiming angles depending on how high off the road surface the light is installed in the vehicle. This is why when you shop for Hella European spec headlamps, the high/low beam units (usually with H4 bulbs) have so many different choices (at least 3 for each size/form factor).
Originally Posted by Paul Workman View Post
For those unfamiliar with LED headlights - i.e.,specifically designed to be used on the highway (DOT approved/type accepted), will deflect or focus the (LO) beam down away from the eyes of on-coming drivers. And, in the case of (so-called) projector LED headlights, the division between the illuminated and un-illuminated portion of the beam is quite sharp (read: not fuzzy); i.e., the "drive line". Google LED headlights for many examples of lights intended for highway use and you'll see many examples (aka) "drive line".

Once installed, it is critical that the headlights be aimed to avoid blinding on-coming traffic! There are several methods and even specially designed headlight aiming jigs to rough them in. But, whichever method you use to initially aim the lights, the best way to check to see if they're aimed correctly is on a deserted street while sitting in the drivers seat w/ approx half tank of gas. The edge of the LO beam intersects the level road surface at about 100-150 yards ahead. (Mine I set at ~ 150 which seems to work well [I don't get "flashed" by on-coming cars, but can still see the road far enough to avoid most hazards]).
See above, there's no such thing as "DOT Approved" headlights.

The best reference for aiming headlamps is here: https://www.danielsternlighting.com/tech/aim/aim.html

And you want to aim the lamps with the tank nearly full (definitely over half full), and with whatever load in the trunk (or bed of the pickup truck) that approximates the heaviest load you'll have in there at night or in the rain. That way, your headlamp aim will go down slightly with lighter loads, which is less annoying to oncoming traffic than having the aim too high when loaded. If you have "self leveling" suspension, or on a truck, if you have and use air shocks or other leveling devices, set the lights with the suspension set to the most used setting.

Last edited by C6_Racer_X; 12-17-2018 at 10:01 AM.
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Old 12-17-2018, 10:00 AM
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I have installed those headlights as well and they seem to illuminate well with a good cutoff and are not blinding oncoming drivers. I do not drive the car often, so cannot speak to their longevity.
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Old 12-17-2018, 08:04 PM
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Jesus Christ, long rambling rants about how shitty they are from people who donít have them, and short positive feedback from those who do have them. Funny how often that happens around here. I donít have anything to gain whether somebody else wants to buy them or not, but Iíve been very impressed by them, regardless of how much they cost.
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Old 12-18-2018, 12:05 AM
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Originally Posted by JBPC4 View Post
Jesus Christ, long rambling rants about how shitty they are from people who donít have them, and short positive feedback from those who do have them. Funny how often that happens around here. I donít have anything to gain whether somebody else wants to buy them or not, but Iíve been very impressed by them, regardless of how much they cost.
Same, nothing to gain just sharing my experience.

I was able to max out the height adjustment up and still have the cutpff very low, perks of the car i guess. The bright spots referenced dont really seem to happen on my car, they may be blocked by the car being so low and the front bumper blocking it?

Any flaws they may have, i will say these are 5000x better than the oem stuff i had, and 500x than the cheapo leds i had after the oems.
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Old 12-18-2018, 10:13 AM
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​​​​this all looks great and is the way i would go if modíding my headlights now...

My current situation is I have the daniel
stern 100/130w halogen bulbs in bosch e spec housings , relays, and heavy 10 gage wiring.

while you can argue the 200 w (260 on highs) i am pulling is a draw/drag on the alternator - i am otherwise happy with the setup.

do i shell out bucks for LED just because it may be slightly better and its the cool thing now?

do i wait for a bulb to burn out, then make a decision ?

Do i keep my wallet fatter and stay with what i got bc im happy ?

It also says these ledís drAw 100w - thats a lot for LED lights, so that means 200 watts. So LEDís arent really saving any power (vs my current daniel stern 100/130w setup).

usually ledís put out a lot of light (more lumens per watt vs halogen) so i imagine these are insanely bright and perhaps maybe id be happier with more light output of these vs my daniel stern setup !?

Argh! Decisions

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Old 12-18-2018, 11:55 AM
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I've never used or seen the Daniel stern stuff, so I cant comment on it.

I will say, a halogen pulling 200w vs a led pulling 200w, the LED will be WAY brighter. I think I'd be inclined to buy the LEDs if you do much night driving, and sell your setup to someone after a more OEM look.

I bought mine thinking at 90 bucks they probably wouldsuck and I would send them back. If the 90 bucks isnt a big deal to you, I'd buy them and send them back if you dont like them.
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Old 12-18-2018, 01:27 PM
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Originally Posted by C6_Racer_X View Post
Is this the picture you're looking for?



It's hard to judge entirely from that picture, but based on that pic and some of the other pictures, I wouldn't have these lights on my own vehicles.

They are somewhat "less bad" than many of the other offerings on Amazon, but they don't look legal to me, and I'm not sure they would be your safest choice either.

There is a bit of a "bump" across the top of the cutoff. That's pretty much required by the US DOT specs. On the pic, it looks a little bright. If you aim using the top of that lump as the cutoff point, you'll have the lights aimed way too low. If you aim with the broader cutoff line as the beam center line, then that lump will be annoying to oncoming traffic. That lump is there to light up signs, and you can see in the bigger pic in that image how much it lights up the speed limit sign down the street.

But that's not the biggest safety issue for you. There's those two "drips" or "fangs" hanging down below the center of the beam. That puts a lot of foreground light on the road. The effect of that on your eyes is that they see bright light close to the car, and your pupils constrict, and when that happens, your distance vision disappears into darkness. Personally, I've witnessed two different single car accidents where cars with LED headlights have struck fixed objects that they should have seen, but didn't see because of the dangerous beam pattern of their (aftermarket) LED headlights. One of those accidents, I was in the passenger seat when the vehicle struck a fallen tree that was across the road. I won't ride in cars with dangerous headlights any more. I've also seen a disproportionate number of LED "conversion" headlights in the yards at local body shops around here, usually with front end damage.

There are some round headlamps that look a lot like that which are sold by Harley Davidson for their motorcycles, and actually are DOT compliant, and are legal for use on motorcycles on public roads. Even those have a different set of specifications and regulations because motorcycles only have a single headlamp.

DOT compliant headlamps will have at least three markings on the lens. There must be a manufacturer's mark in the center of the lens, either the name in print or the manufacturer's trademark. There must be the letters DOT on the face of the lens (SAE is also allowed if the lamp meets SAE specifications), and there must be a bulb type designator (2B1 is the designator for H6054 and related 5x7 rectangular sealed beam lights).

Anyone claiming the headlamps they are selling are "(US) DOT Approved" is lying to you about their product. In the United States, lighting manufacturers self certify that their lights comply with DOT safety regulations, including the beam pattern. They indicate compliance by placing the three required markings that I mentioned.

Oh, and that Chinese toy also has a bogus European marking on the lens. Proper European lights have even higher requirements, and depending on the country they do the certification in, they actually do test performance of the lamps in either Government laboratories or in private labs licensed by the government. The lamp in the picture has one of the markings indicating it's been certified in Germany, but is missing several other required markings, and there's no way it passes TUV testing with the pattern shown in that picture. Also, Germans generally require 3 different versions of any lamp, with different angles between the high beam and low beam centers, because TUV regulations specify three different aiming angles depending on how high off the road surface the light is installed in the vehicle. This is why when you shop for Hella European spec headlamps, the high/low beam units (usually with H4 bulbs) have so many different choices (at least 3 for each size/form factor).


See above, there's no such thing as "DOT Approved" headlights.

The best reference for aiming headlamps is here: https://www.danielsternlighting.com/tech/aim/aim.html

And you want to aim the lamps with the tank nearly full (definitely over half full), and with whatever load in the trunk (or bed of the pickup truck) that approximates the heaviest load you'll have in there at night or in the rain. That way, your headlamp aim will go down slightly with lighter loads, which is less annoying to oncoming traffic than having the aim too high when loaded. If you have "self leveling" suspension, or on a truck, if you have and use air shocks or other leveling devices, set the lights with the suspension set to the most used setting.
Yes, DOT compliant is what I meant. But, rather than take the 3rd party definition of the Federal code, it is always better to goto the source.

And, specifically CFR õ Title 49 õ Subtitle B õ Chapter V õ Part 571 õ Subpart B õ Section 571.108 sub section S6.1.5.2 provides exacting detail (for compliant components).

In short, look for the DOT (and SAE) compliant notification on the lens. Such components meet the specifications for compliance.

For more information (on the LARSEN LIGHT (A0102) https://www.larsenlights.com/
Another DOT compliant light for the C4 is the GE Nighthawk. (Also the LED marketed under Trucklight appears to be very similar to the GE Nighthawk, but I can't say at the moment whether or not that product is DOT compliant or not.

Last edited by Paul Workman; 12-18-2018 at 01:43 PM.
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Old 12-18-2018, 02:43 PM
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Could be fake for sure, but FWIW these lights do have the DOT/SAE label on the lense.


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Old 12-18-2018, 05:03 PM
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Originally Posted by JBPC4 View Post
Could be fake for sure, but FWIW these lights do have the DOT/SAE label on the lense.




They are not compliant, and they are not marked as compliant. There are at least 3, usually 4 markings required on a sealed headlamp with no serviceable light source installed. There must be:
  • A manufacturer's trade mark or name. This is the manufacturer who is certifying compliance, and if there are consumer complaints, this is the manufacturer that can be asked to provide proof of compliance, and can be forced to recall defective/non-compliant products. On the ones in the picture, the manufacturer was unwilling to put their name or mark on the lens, so I'm guessing they know it doesn't comply with the regulations.
  • A bulb designation. I'm pretty sure that LED replacements for H6054 and related 5x7 rectangular lamps are designated "HL11"
  • The word(s) "Sealed (Beam)". "Sealed" is required when there are no serviceable/replaceable bulbs, "Sealed Beam" is optional.
  • The letters "DOT", optionally with "SAE" if the bulb also complies with SAE standards.
Without all 4 marks, the lamps, sealed beam units or bulbs are not legal for use on public roads and are questionable as far as safety goes.

Without a manufacturer's mark, you can't even make a complaint to the USDOT because you don't know who is misrepresenting the product as compliant, because you don't know who made the thing.

If you want a reasonably good LED replacement, the GE NightHawk LEDs are probably the best available. The Truck light units are at least roadworthy and legal, but nothing spectacular. If you look closely at the pics on Amazon and other sites selling those, you can see all of the marks that are required for a "self certified" DOT compliant headlamp.

Anything that lacks all 4 marks (or only 3, if the light source/bulb is replaceable, the "Sealed (Beam)" mark is not required and actually inappropriate).

And for anyone running European lights, an E in a circle with a number is the designation. The number indicates the country where the lights were certified/approved. Most European countries actually do require headlights (and other automotive lights) to be tested in government labs, or government approved private labs, and they must have proof of performance to be approved. On Eurpean spec lights, the manufacturer is also required, as is the bulb designator for the proper bulb (H4 is common for this size), and a few other marks that are less significant.

Contrary to what you may have heard, it's actually legal for some people to drive on US roads with European headlamps. All you need is Canadian tags and a Canadian registration and it's absolutely legal. I've run European lights on most of my vehicles since the 1980's, and I've never been stopped for having US tags and Euro headlights, but technically, that's an equipment violation and you can get a ticket for it. YMMV.

Also, there are no LED "conversion" bulbs which replace any halogen bulbs (H4, 9006, H7 or any other halogen bulb) in halogen optics (of any kind, reflector or projector) that are legal or safe. Those LED retrofits range from truly horrifying to merely dangerous and annoying. As I stated above, the danger is more to yourself than to other vehicles. They are annoying to other vehicles, but the accidents I've seen with those setups at night have all been single car accidents, usually with significant damage (often total loss damage) to the vehicle with the LED "Conversion" lights.

Last edited by C6_Racer_X; 12-18-2018 at 05:08 PM.
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Old 12-18-2018, 06:33 PM
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At the end of the day, thereís no argument or debate to be had here. Nobody has to buy these or any other light if they donít want to. What I can tell you for sure is that these lights are a massive improvement over the stock C4 lights. The stock lights are literally early 80ís technology, and their light output is laughable compared to modern cars. I didnít even like driving mine at night with the original lights because I couldnít see crap. Now I look forward to night driving because the light output on these is great, easily on par with the oem lighting on my other cars which are 2016 and 2017 model years. Not all aftermarket LED lighting is equal. Iíve been in cars with crappy LEDs as well, but these lights are surprisingly good, and the price just makes things even better.
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Old 12-18-2018, 06:55 PM
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I'm going to be blunt... i, my inspectation station, and my local law enforcement don't give a **** if these companies paid to be truly dot compliant. If they work, and have an acceptable level of performance and quality, that's what i care about. Any imperfections these have, these are still better than the sealed beam candles they replaced.

I'd also argue that your data is skewed. Even if we ignore your VERY imperfect sampling, you're placing causation on a single data point. It's far more likely that the driver type is the issue, not the lights. People replacing their lights with aftermarket options are probably a bit more likely to speed, drive aggressively, and things like that as they obviously care a little bit about the car since they chose to modify it. Trying to claim that lighting is the root cause seems absurd to me, especially given like 90%of drivera are distracted while driving.
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