Coolant refill procedure - CorvetteForum - Chevrolet Corvette Forum Discussion

Notices
C5 Tech Corvette Tech/Performance: LS1 Corvette Technical Info, Internal Engine, External Engine, Tech Topics, Basic Tech, Maintenance, How to Remove & Replace
Sponsored by:
Sponsored by:

Coolant refill procedure

Reply

 
 
 
Old 01-16-2018, 07:30 PM
  #1  
sdadams
CF Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Member Since: Dec 2004
Location: Murphy NC
Posts: 307
Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Default Coolant refill procedure

I'm about to replace all the coolant hoses on a 2003 Z06. Can someone point me to the proper refill procedure so that I don't get air bound?
sdadams is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2018, 08:44 PM
  #2  
neutron82
Bangin' Gears
Support Corvetteforum!
 
neutron82's Avatar
 
Member Since: Dec 2010
Location: Plain-0 TX
Posts: 7,911
Thanked 653 Times in 587 Posts
Default

I just fill it up, burp out what I can by hand, then let it idle for 20-30 mins with the overflow cap off... basically let the fans cycle a few times and burp the hoses by hand during this process then top off as needed and replace the cap
neutron82 is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2018, 10:31 PM
  #3  
sdadams
CF Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Member Since: Dec 2004
Location: Murphy NC
Posts: 307
Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by neutron82 View Post
I just fill it up, burp out what I can by hand, then let it idle for 20-30 mins with the overflow cap off... basically let the fans cycle a few times and burp the hoses by hand during this process then top off as needed and replace the cap
Thanks for the suggestion.
sdadams is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2018, 03:27 AM
  #4  
UM Rebel
CF Senior Member
 
UM Rebel's Avatar
 
Member Since: Apr 2007
Location: Lafayette Louisiana
Posts: 1,213
Thanked 68 Times in 57 Posts
Default

My procedure is
Drain coolant.
Fill with Distilled water
Go for a drive heater on max
Drain coolant
Fill with Distilled water
Go for a drive heater on max
Drain coolant
Put in a Gallon and a half of Preston Concentrate
Fill with Distilled water
Go for a drive.
Check and fill with Distilled water if needed.

The question, what do you do with the old coolant?

Last edited by UM Rebel; 01-17-2018 at 03:47 AM.
UM Rebel is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2018, 09:15 AM
  #5  
bigmackloud
CF Senior Member
 
bigmackloud's Avatar
 
Member Since: Feb 2013
Location: Apex NC
Posts: 439
Thanked 67 Times in 53 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by UM Rebel View Post
The question, what do you do with the old coolant?
My local county has a recycle center that takes antifreeze. And it's free.
bigmackloud is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2018, 09:25 AM
  #6  
sdadams
CF Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Member Since: Dec 2004
Location: Murphy NC
Posts: 307
Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Default

Thanks
sdadams is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2018, 10:12 AM
  #7  
bigmackloud
CF Senior Member
 
bigmackloud's Avatar
 
Member Since: Feb 2013
Location: Apex NC
Posts: 439
Thanked 67 Times in 53 Posts
Default

Anybody used one of the vacuum filling tools? The videos I've watched make it look awesome. Basically the tool pulls a vacuum on your cooling system (like you would an AC system before charging), and then that vacuum pulls the coolant in. Which means no air pockets in the system to burp out.

Here's an example. A little pricey if you're just doing one car, but over a lifetime of vehicles could be worthwhile.
http://amzn.to/2DioZv3
bigmackloud is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2018, 10:51 AM
  #8  
runner140*
CF Senior Member
Support Corvetteforum!
 
runner140*'s Avatar
 
Member Since: Mar 2004
Location: Ft. Lauderdale Fl
Posts: 8,306
Thanked 191 Times in 177 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by neutron82 View Post
I just fill it up, burp out what I can by hand, then let it idle for 20-30 mins with the overflow cap off... basically let the fans cycle a few times and burp the hoses by hand during this process then top off as needed and replace the cap
That's the method I use.....has worked for many years.
runner140* is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2018, 11:15 AM
  #9  
Ed Ramberger
CF Senior Member
 
Ed Ramberger's Avatar
 
Member Since: May 2008
Location: NC
Posts: 543
Thanked 116 Times in 85 Posts
Default

My C4 had bleeder screws. Haven't done my C5 yet. Reading this I'm kind of surprised they went away. I also usually look for a sensor that's higher that can function as a bleeder. Luckily the PO had it done once - I have some time to familiarize myself with the car.

Last edited by Ed Ramberger; 01-17-2018 at 11:15 AM.
Ed Ramberger is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2018, 08:08 PM
  #10  
Bill Dearborn
Tech Contributor
 
Bill Dearborn's Avatar
 
Member Since: Oct 1999
Location: Charlotte (formerly Endicott, NY) NC
Posts: 31,258
Thanked 2,457 Times in 1,691 Posts
Default

I just drained the coolant, filled with plain drinkable water (all that GM recommends) and is easy to get from your garden hose, ran engine, drained, filled, ran engine, drained again and repeated until drained water was clear. That got rid of all the old coolant. At that point I would replace hoses and fill with the proper amount of coolant (6 quarts I believe) and top off with plain drinkable water. Then drive car, let cool down and drive again. Let it cool down again and check coolant level. If low then top off with plain drinkable water.

No need to use Distilled Water, Deionized water. If it is safe enough for you to drink it is OK in the cooling system per GM recommendations in its service manuals. If you use DexCool coolant that will get you 5 years coolant life before you need to touch it again.

Bill
Bill Dearborn is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2018, 10:29 AM
  #11  
Ed Ramberger
CF Senior Member
 
Ed Ramberger's Avatar
 
Member Since: May 2008
Location: NC
Posts: 543
Thanked 116 Times in 85 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Bill Dearborn View Post
I just drained the coolant, filled with plain drinkable water (all that GM recommends) and is easy to get from your garden hose, ran engine, drained, filled, ran engine, drained again and repeated until drained water was clear. That got rid of all the old coolant. At that point I would replace hoses and fill with the proper amount of coolant (6 quarts I believe) and top off with plain drinkable water. Then drive car, let cool down and drive again. Let it cool down again and check coolant level. If low then top off with plain drinkable water.

No need to use Distilled Water, Deionized water. If it is safe enough for you to drink it is OK in the cooling system per GM recommendations in its service manuals. If you use DexCool coolant that will get you 5 years coolant life before you need to touch it again.

Bill

NEVER use tap or hose water - always use deionized or distilled. The minerals found in tap water will contribute to electrolysis inside your engine slowly eating away at radiators, heater cores, head gaskets, etc...

This is one time where even if the FSM said it was ok, it's wrong. I worked for an OEM engine manufacturer for 14 years and we specified deionized or distilled because we knew the results of using tap water or drinking water with minerals in it. Also, from working at manufacturer level, I can tell you that FSMs are not infallible and do get published with errors and omissions from time to time.

Bill - I understand you followed the directions you found - just trying to help everyone out in the long term.

Last edited by Ed Ramberger; 01-20-2018 at 10:47 AM.
Ed Ramberger is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2018, 03:58 PM
  #12  
mrlmd
CF Senior Member
 
mrlmd's Avatar
 
Member Since: Jun 2013
Location: Shell Point (Crawfordville) Florida
Posts: 1,046
Thanks: 0
Thanked 93 Times in 70 Posts
Default

You may be mistaking electrolysis for galvanic corrosion.
Galvanic corrosion is driven by the difference in corrosion potential (or electrical potential) between two metals in contact, immersed in an electrolyte, while electrolytic corrosion or electrolysis is driven by the external sources of EMF (ie, current) passing between them.
The minerals in the water may be what is making the antifreeze into an electrolyte so that it may conduct a current flow, (thereby leading to corrosion of the less noble metal), but there must be source of current for electrolysis to occur. There is no corrosion if all the metals are equal on the galvanic scale, immersed in an electrolyte or not.
As a practical matter, while distilled water is probably better, I don't think there's a great deal of harm with using clean drinkable tapwater, and there are no dire warnings against using it or consequences reported from using it, in the millions of cars on the road, especially with all the anti-corrosion additives in all the antifreezes on the market used today.

Last edited by mrlmd; 01-20-2018 at 04:07 PM.
mrlmd is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2018, 04:50 PM
  #13  
Ed Ramberger
CF Senior Member
 
Ed Ramberger's Avatar
 
Member Since: May 2008
Location: NC
Posts: 543
Thanked 116 Times in 85 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by mrlmd View Post
You may be mistaking electrolysis for galvanic corrosion.
Galvanic corrosion is driven by the difference in corrosion potential (or electrical potential) between two metals in contact, immersed in an electrolyte, while electrolytic corrosion or electrolysis is driven by the external sources of EMF (ie, current) passing between them.
The minerals in the water may be what is making the antifreeze into an electrolyte so that it may conduct a current flow, (thereby leading to corrosion of the less noble metal), but there must be source of current for electrolysis to occur. There is no corrosion if all the metals are equal on the galvanic scale, immersed in an electrolyte or not.
As a practical matter, while distilled water is probably better, I don't think there's a great deal of harm with using clean drinkable tapwater, and there are no dire warnings against using it or consequences reported from using it, in the millions of cars on the road, especially with all the anti-corrosion additives in all the antifreezes on the market used today.
I think you're splitting hairs. Either way - here is a good article.

The water where I lived in WI was so hard you would have to have been nuts to add it to a radiator. Note the author works for a company that specializes in cooling system.

http://www.hotrod.com/articles/keep-...-electrolysis/
Ed Ramberger is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2018, 11:27 PM
  #14  
magneticred
Junior Member
 
magneticred's Avatar
 
Member Since: May 2002
Location: Fayetteville NC
Posts: 42
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Default

Recommended procedure removing any air after changing coolant:
1. Close drain valve after old fluid is out.
2. Fill via the surge tank (50:50)
3. Start engine and idle for 1 minute before closing surge tank.
4. Install surge tank cap.
5. Cycle from idle for 30 seconds, to 3000 rpm for 30 seconds, and continue this until coolant temp is 210 F (99 C).
6. Turn off engine, take off surge cap, restart engine, idle for 1 minute.
7. Add coolant till 1/2 inch above cold full mark, then put the cap back on.
8. Cycle from idle to 3000 rpm just like step 5 until it reaches the same temp.
9. Turn off engine, add coolant till 1/2 inch above cold full mark, put cap back on.
10. Done.
magneticred is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2018, 06:28 PM
  #15  
sdadams
CF Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Member Since: Dec 2004
Location: Murphy NC
Posts: 307
Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by magneticred View Post
Recommended procedure removing any air after changing coolant:
1. Close drain valve after old fluid is out.
2. Fill via the surge tank (50:50)
3. Start engine and idle for 1 minute before closing surge tank.
4. Install surge tank cap.
5. Cycle from idle for 30 seconds, to 3000 rpm for 30 seconds, and continue this until coolant temp is 210 F (99 C).
6. Turn off engine, take off surge cap, restart engine, idle for 1 minute.
7. Add coolant till 1/2 inch above cold full mark, then put the cap back on.
8. Cycle from idle to 3000 rpm just like step 5 until it reaches the same temp.
9. Turn off engine, add coolant till 1/2 inch above cold full mark, put cap back on.
10. Done.





Thanks guys!
sdadams is offline  
Reply With Quote
 
 
 


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Quick Reply: Coolant refill procedure


Sponsored Ads
Vendor Directory

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.
 
  • Ask a Question
    Get answers from community experts
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: