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Waterspotting: Is there an acrylic that can Protect???

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Waterspotting: Is there an acrylic that can Protect???

 
Old 06-11-2019, 10:28 PM
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sothpaw2
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Default Waterspotting: Is there an acrylic that can Protect???

Hi,

I am sending my Black C5Z in for buffing next week. It has a lot of water spots in it and some tree stains since my mechanic parked it under some tree for days.

The detailer will add wax when done. But he mentioned that for more $, he could apply an acrylic over the clear to better protect it. That really appeals to me because currently, I only drive the car on sunny days. That is because if there is a little rain and then it turns sunny when I am at work, I get Waterspotting. If the car is still wet, I dry it, but if the sun totally bakes in the spots, they don't wash or clay away.

So has anyone here heard of an acrylic or other "armor treatment" that would not waterspot permanently if I am away at work for 8hr so as not to be able to get the car out of the Sun? Would you pay a few hundred if a reputable detailer offered it?

Thanks,

Andy

Last edited by sothpaw2; 06-11-2019 at 10:30 PM.
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Old 06-13-2019, 02:44 PM
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If you want to go down a rabbit hole look into ceramic coatings. Its very popular now, and the process is expensive due to the paint needing to be properly "corrected" which means remove the swirl marks prior to applying. It also requires maintenance to last the long term so I am not completely sold on them. The whole thing takes me back to the 80s and 90s when Teflon coatings were the rage.

I don't know the skills of your detailer but I have found many do not truly understand what proper detailing is and just make shiny cars. I teach Auto Tech (mechanical) but also teach professional detailing and reconditioning courses. All due respect to you and your detailer, If you are not well versed in proper auto detailing processes, I recommend gathering a little knowledge to be sure you detailer is qualified.

Regarding detailing products many are not as good as their claims which is frustrating. Do your research on ceramic coatings but in the meantime, if you don't want to take the leap $$-wise for a professionally applied sealant, consider some of the over-the-counter ceramic sprays that have come to market this last year or two. I have used Meguiars Ceram-X and it does offer protection. Also, since it is a thick liquid (but sprayable) I noticed it has a small filling effect for light swirl marks (good for dark colored cars). Having ceramic content and curing abilities, I expect Ceram-X would last longer than a wax. Meguiars recommends spraying on and rinsing off for the application, however, it can also be wiped on and buffed off which I personally feel offers better coverage.

Hope this helps with some direction.
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Old 06-13-2019, 03:09 PM
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Kevova
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There are some commercial products available. Your detailer may have a suggestion. You want a product that has a sheeting action. Water sheets off not beading on surface. The beads act like a magnifine glass focusing sunlight and etching paint.
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Old 06-14-2019, 07:55 AM
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Thanks! So theoretically, you guys think that there might be some ceramic that would create a sheeting action so that the water would just run off?? Or is this coating softer than the clear so that it is just easy to get out hard water stains left by the minerals??
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Old 06-14-2019, 09:31 AM
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That is correct. All of the ceramic products I have seen or used offer water sheeting benefits. Water sheeting, however, not only depends on the product sealing the surface but also the amount of water and on which panel the water lays. Water that lands on a horizontal surface like a hood without much slope may just sit there and not run off. Or on a side panel, the amount of water may not be enough to run off (this happens with lawn sprinklers) So, its important to have that "barrier" coat applied to provide a layer of protection for situations where the water will sit.
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Old Yesterday, 04:38 AM
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Originally Posted by Double-O View Post
That is correct. All of the ceramic products I have seen or used offer water sheeting benefits. Water sheeting, however, not only depends on the product sealing the surface but also the amount of water and on which panel the water lays. Water that lands on a horizontal surface like a hood without much slope may just sit there and not run off. Or on a side panel, the amount of water may not be enough to run off (this happens with lawn sprinklers) So, its important to have that "barrier" coat applied to provide a layer of protection for situations where the water will sit.
Ok. If there is too much water as mentioned, what does the extra layer buy me?? Is it just easier to wash the etched minerals out of the ceramic?? Or do minerals somehow take much longer to penetrate? Or is this extra layer just a throw away that I am expected to buff away the first time it rains and then the sun remerges, baking it in???
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Old Yesterday, 08:38 AM
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Every region has different environmental conditions. That's where a local professional know what works best in their area. The etching is where the clear is being burnt through. Having a "Shammie" in the car to give car a quick wipe. Minimizing length of time water may bead on surfaces, is the best way to reduce water spots.
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Old Yesterday, 10:02 PM
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Originally Posted by Kevova View Post
Every region has different environmental conditions. That's where a local professional know what works best in their area. The etching is where the clear is being burnt through. Having a "Shammie" in the car to give car a quick wipe. Minimizing length of time water may bead on surfaces, is the best way to reduce water spots.
Yes, but if I am at work, I can't watch for every passing drizzle. I do have bath towels in the car. But sometimes the weather guy is wrong and there is a passing shower followed by Sun to bake it. I was at the track years ago and iat rained on and off all weekend. I would dry it, it would rain again 1 hr later. I gave up.

It would be great to have a coating that could get through that rainy weekend and not spot permanently.
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