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Garage Build - Detached Input Requested

 
Old 02-08-2019, 10:24 AM
  #21  
Factoid
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R3, you don’t say where you are located, but indicate you need both heat and a/c (here in south Texas I can get away with a/c only even though the high will be 45 today). You’ve gotten some excellent advice, so I’ll just add a few.
  • Ensure you have 220v for your lift and compressor if you plan on regular car work. While 110v will lift the car and run an impact wrench, it will not run a sander or sprayer effectively.
  • Build a separate room or closet for your compressor. Your ears and nerves will thank you.
  • Add a floor drain in an area where you can wash and degrease your car and perhaps yourself!
  • If you build a one story with high ceilings, consider adding a loft (even if it only has a four foot ceiling) for storing parts and ladder access, you will value getting stuff out of your way.

My wife made the mistake (my advantage) of giving me the basement (unfinished) and garage (small and crappy) of our NY lake house during the remodel. So far, all I did was knock down the wall (was just in front of the two cars just inside the garage door) and design the man cave portion with a bar, big screen tv, pool table, bathroom and outside access. I’ll be following this thread carefully as I start to design the garage. Unfortunately, I am limited to a 8 1/2’ ceiling.

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Old 02-08-2019, 11:20 AM
  #22  
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Originally Posted by biggd View Post
I have a lake house in NH with an attached 2 car garage. I just finished the room above the garage and I'm going to have foam insulation done on the garage walls. There's no heat now in the room about the garage so we only use it in the warm months. I was thinking of heating the room and the garage with a Hyper unit mini split but we can get temperatures below zero there in the winter. What do you think? I'd be happy with the garage in the 50's.
Here is NC we got down to about 12į F a few weeks ago and the mini splits worked fine. Since these units are heat pumps the temperature differential is definitely a factor so I would suggest that you check with someone in a location similar to yours. The units I have are made by Carrier and they are vastly superior to the "old" heat pumps from a few years ago.
Charles
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Old 02-08-2019, 11:48 AM
  #23  
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Originally Posted by cbernhardt View Post
Here is NC we got down to about 12į F a few weeks ago and the mini splits worked fine. Since these units are heat pumps the temperature differential is definitely a factor so I would suggest that you check with someone in a location similar to yours. The units I have are made by Carrier and they are vastly superior to the "old" heat pumps from a few years ago.
Charles
The Mitsubishi Hyper units claim to throw heat down to -15?
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Old 02-08-2019, 12:06 PM
  #24  
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One suggestion to add to the excellent previous comments. I installed two large grey underground eblows (at least 3” dia) in the corner of the slab where most likely I’d later want local area network, water, etc. to enter the building. These underground trunk lines cost basically nothing to install during the slab pour. They are set about 3” in from the sill plate so easily accessible. The trunks exits are about 8-10” underground and extend beyond the outside face of the slab. My trunks now carry the boiler supply and return water lines for our home’s boiler and LAN lines. All underground. I have an inexpensive pull down stairs so I can store misc things above. If you do a pull down stair get the heavy duty unit not the 250# rated lightest one. Fun stuff.
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Old 02-08-2019, 02:44 PM
  #25  
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X2 on the pull down stairs, especially if it’s just for attic storage
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Old 02-08-2019, 06:08 PM
  #26  
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You also need one of these for the roof.

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Old 02-08-2019, 06:34 PM
  #27  
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go on youtube

look up ''RR buildings''

they put up all kinds
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Old 02-09-2019, 04:49 AM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by JohnZ View Post
Here's a specs document and a feature article from Corvette Fever on my attached garage, built 20 years ago with the house; you may find some useful tips and hints you can apply to yours.
i inherited dadís house with garage on 17 acres. Sounds great, right? Like it would be spread out? Nah! A couple of fonts: donít have any trees around it, as they grow and die and fall.
dont box everything in under the trusses so they can be traced visually.
dont build wide enough for 2 cars, then build a huge 3-sided workbench. Clearance problems. should be widened 6 ft and 3í depth.
Dont forget you may want a backhoe, for fun. And a tractor or 2 left over. So build wide enough to fit the lathe, table saw, etc for a little workshop. Even if you hate tools.
dont tack on your bear butt tight lean-to shack for your backhoe onto the main garage
dont skimp on driveway width. If a concrete truck canít make it, in 5 years UPS will start dripping off packages at front gate. Also, have a turnaround so nobody rams into it (house) pulling out
cut trees back and spread buildings around, as garages can get loud if connected.
however, attached and heated has advantages. Cement in winter is very cold.to lie under car if garage is I heated.
So, there you have it- bigger, wider, deeper, warmer, better lighting, and clear the landscape. Aside from the worry whenever the wind blew or it rained that it would unearth one of these tall, shallow-rooted trees and squash us. Sold a year ago, and really miss dad, who was a great guy with a big heart. Present with the Lord!
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Old 02-09-2019, 05:08 AM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by JohnZ View Post
Here's a specs document and a feature article from Corvette Fever on my attached garage, built 20 years ago with the house; you may find some useful tips and hints you can apply to yours.
i inherited dadís house with garage on 17 acres. Sounds great, right? Like it would be spread out? Nah! A couple of fonts: donít have any trees around it, as they grow and die and fall.
dont box everything in under the trusses so they can be traced visually.
dont build wide enough for 2 cars, then build a huge 3-sided workbench. Clearance problems. should be widened 6 ft and 3í depth.
Dont forget you may want a backhoe, for fun. And a tractor or 2 left over. So build wide enough to fit the lathe, table saw, etc for a little workshop. Even if you hate tools.
dont tack on your bear butt tight lean-to shack for your backhoe onto the main garage
dont skimp on driveway width. If a concrete truck canít make it, in 5 years UPS will start dripping off packages at front gate. Also, have a turnaround so nobody rams into it (house) pulling out
cut trees back and spread buildings around, as garages can get loud if connected.
however, attached and heated has advantages. Cement in winter is very cold.to lie under car if garage is I heated.
So, there you have it- bigger, wider, deeper, warmer, better lighting, and clear the landscape. Aside from the worry whenever the wind blew or it rained that it would unearth one of these tall, shallow-rooted trees and squash us. Sold a year ago, and really miss dad, who was a great guy with a big heart. Present with the Lord!
micksnip
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Old 02-09-2019, 09:03 AM
  #30  
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One never has enough room so go as large as possible.
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Old 02-09-2019, 09:37 AM
  #31  
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If it hasn't already been said, head over to garagejournal and do lots of reading. Start a running list of requirements/desires. Do yourself a favor and get some graph paper and cut scale models of what you intend to put in the garage to see how things fit. Obviously CAD or sketch up work if youd rather go electronically.
Some opinions adding to what has already been said:
Concrete
6in slab should be fine, put grade beams or piers under areas where lift posts to meet thickness requirements.
2ft stem walls so you can hose things out without getting water on drywall. With 12ft studs this gets you to 14ft ceiling height.
Definitely include through-slab conduits at one corner (sub grade to bring utilities, internet, etc in). I also put 2in conduits through the stem wall before they poured the walls - great for running air lines from exterior compressor, drain for slop sink, etc. Much easier than drilling later.

Heat - the in slab is nice but IMO only makes sense if you intend to keep the garage warm all winter. Also only economically feasible if you have gas or intend to go propane boiler. Slab insulation helps no matter what but adds a bit to budget. I only have electric available so I use a radiant heater. Insulate it like a house. Spray foam is expensive and a pain to change/add wiring etc. later. Lookup "flash and batt" for the attic.

Electric - most modern service conductors and meters in my area can support 240VAC 400A. A 150A or 200A sub-panel would be much more than you need unless heat pumps or electric heat. No need for 3-phase especially with modern VFDs.
Lift - I wanted to keep it as close to one wall as possible so it didn't take up the entire garage. Also I wanted to have ample room to work on things on the workbench while a car is on the lift. Ended up 36" from the side wall and 15ft to the workbench. (NOTE this is different from the attached picture). With height and planning don't forget about the height you lose with the rails and the garage door open. Pretty much got this perfect. I found a used 10k Mohawk for less than a new chinese lift. Undoubtedly one of the best things I've ever bought.

Lighting - garage journal has some great info for planning this out. I did the "ring of light" around the lift area, with concentrated task lighting over the work areas. I went fluorescent on the ceiling when a smoking deal came up at Home Depot. Lined up rows of ceiling lights so they are centered through the garage door windows when the doors are open. Task lighting is LED and is much better than fluorescent will switch the ceiling fluorescents to LED when they go out.

Lean-to roof on the back with gravel floor - great for storing mowers, tractor attachments, gasoline, etc. Cheapest way to free up valuable garage space and keep flammables outside.



Last edited by tangel2; 02-09-2019 at 09:39 AM.
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Old 02-09-2019, 09:45 AM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by Rcubed1952 View Post
Getting prepared for the rebirth of my '66 pearl silver 427/425 hopefully June. Wanting to build a new 2+ car garage to house the new baby, store my lawn tractor/equipment & have some room for wood working & working with stain glass.
Thinking about 1,000 SF, with 2 separate front facing 9'x8' doors, one rear facing 6'x7' door (for the lawn equipment) & one man door. No plumbing (not practical), possibly a split heat/cool in wall unit.
I have attached a quick sketch of my thoughts.

Looking for input other than build it twice the size you think you will need.
Input such minimum clear areas around the vehicles. Ceiling height (for a possible lift). Slab thickness (for a possible lift). Power panel capacity. Lighting/Lighting layouts Etc.

Many of you have been doing this a long time. I would appreciate any input I can get. Would rather learn for other's mistakes

Thanks
RRR
I donít know where your located but check out ďPole BarnsĒ. Some like them some donít. I just put up a 28x40 with 3-9í doors on the 40í side and attic trusses with a staircase. Building was up in a week. You can side and trim them with whatever you like, you donít have to use metal. Mine is sided in vinyl and closely matches my house. I plan to stone veneer the bottom soon.

Budget is everything, everyoneís situation is different.

The biggie for me was getting the size I wanted and no foundation cost, saving me 15-20k of excavation and concrete. Sure this building might not last forever, but I didnít build it for the next owner!!

Garagejournal is a huge resource for information.

Most lifts require a 6Ē 3500psi slab and 12í of height. I did 10í of height and that gave me 7í-9Ē in the loft in order to meet a 20í height limit. Iíll wind up with a short post clear floor Mohawk lift. High vehicle, I can sit on a stool.
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Old 02-09-2019, 10:31 AM
  #33  
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I am a big believer in large garage doors. I would recommend either 2: 10'x10' or 1: 10'x18'. Also in the garage doors,openers, run your tracks to the top of the ceiling and install side mount garage door openers.
Another option that is a bit more pricey, but absolutely worth the cost is "glass" garage doors. As you can see by the pictures, I choose the tinted but there is many options available. https://www.clopaydoor.com/avante


As you can see, from the road side the doors are dark from the inside, you can easily see out and the amount of natural light makes it nice when doing projects in the garage.

For lighting, I just went the the ultra cheep porcelain sockets spaced about every 8', then added the large lumens LED bulbs. Here is a great chart the help you decide what is best for your space. https://www.consumerreports.org/cro/...uide/index.htm

A final suggestion for the best lighting is once you drywall, paint the walls and ceiling a bright white and for ease of cleaning use a semi gloss or gloss paint.
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Old 02-10-2019, 09:32 AM
  #34  
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Wow, so many great ideas from those who've already thought a lot about this. I just had my 3rd garage built in the past 5 years. Here is what I'd recommend, in addition to what everybody else said above:

1. Make it as big as you can.
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Old 02-10-2019, 10:57 AM
  #35  
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Thanks Bighouse. Do you by chance have any pictures you could post.
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Old 02-10-2019, 01:04 PM
  #36  
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This is what happens when you start out without enough space. Although when I added two more cars, and needed the 4 post lift, and a Kayak that didn't help. I just pushed out the far wall for a shop.


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Old 02-10-2019, 08:27 PM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by Rcubed1952 View Post
Thanks Bighouse. Do you by chance have any pictures you could post.
Message me your email and Iíll send you some and all the details.
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Old 02-10-2019, 10:51 PM
  #38  
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Mark...I can't resist......Love the layout of your garage/man cave...Except for one thing...Powder Room?.........Paul
[/QUOTE]
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Old 02-10-2019, 10:59 PM
  #39  
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A wide 14' roll up door is a must. The slab must accommodate the weight of a lift. That's non-negotiable. Not plumbing it? That's not even an option. It's a must have. Air conditioning and heat? Must haves.
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Old 02-10-2019, 11:21 PM
  #40  
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This residence of 5K SF, under roof houses a garage that can accommodate a 45' Prevost coach. The floors are thermal heated, a sewer pipe for the coach, and floor drains running the length of the garage. The glass door should have been tinted, since the inside contents are visible from the street.
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