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Rear Camber

 
Old 03-14-2019, 04:04 PM
  #61  
TedH
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ONE benefit of having a vette as a toy is you can do all sorts of work on it without affecting your daily commute to work.

My 1980 L48 had 96k miles when I bought it in 1997. It was tired (mechanically) but it was also nearly untouched (all there) save for a custom red paint job, chrome air cleaner, chrome valve covers, AM/FM/CD and a car alarm that drained the battery.

I had rear camber issues from day 1. I solved the issues gradually and in the following progression:
rear struts (poly adjustable) - Vette Brakes & Products
left rear spindle assembly (bearings failure) - Van Steel rebuilt to better than new
right rear spindle rebuild - Van Steel
half shafts rebuilt - Van Steel
NEW service replacement Dana 44 - blueprinted and 3.54 Spicer gears added - Alan's Gearworks, Clearwater, FL

Now, if I have camber issues, I can adjust the poly adjustable strut rods. Everything else has minimal wear.
Trailing arm assemblies rebuilt with new t-arm bushings.
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Old 03-15-2019, 09:53 AM
  #62  
cagotzmann
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Originally Posted by CanadaGrant View Post
The only real trick to doing this is your garage floor has to be level.

or measure the floor level and adjust.

So use a long level that spans left rear wheel to right rear wheel eg if this is .2 degree slope where the left wheel is higher than the right wheel.

Then subtract. .2 degrees from the left wheel reading and add .2 degrees from the right wheel reading.
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Old 03-15-2019, 11:29 AM
  #63  
Greengear
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I did a simalar job on my 77 a few months ago. It was really satisfying to get rid of all the wander the blown strut rod bushing introduced. Also a badly worn stub shaft was causing a rear end bind in turns after long strainght line drives.
I was lucky to be allowed to use a modern alignment machine myself for free. It was very cool to see everything align to factory specs. I still have a small amount of wander so im considering replacing the front bushings next.
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Old 03-15-2019, 11:55 AM
  #64  
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When I refreshed the front suspension with a kit from Vette Brakes and Products, I was amazed at the improvement in handling and road manners. The (rubber) kit included the tie rods with jam nuts. At the time (in 1997), my mechanic neighbor did the front suspension refresh in my garage. He performed the alignment by eye and had me take it to the local alignment shop to confirm the results. The shop asked me why I brought it to them since it was spot on. He had the gift.
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Old Yesterday, 01:14 AM
  #65  
akdale
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Originally Posted by cagotzmann View Post
or measure the floor level and adjust.

So use a long level that spans left rear wheel to right rear wheel eg if this is .2 degree slope where the left wheel is higher than the right wheel.

Then subtract. .2 degrees from the left wheel reading and add .2 degrees from the right wheel reading.
Or a straight edge of that length and zero your gauge on it then take reading on wheel. That was the approach I took
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Old Yesterday, 11:50 AM
  #66  
cagotzmann
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Originally Posted by akdale View Post
Or a straight edge of that length and zero your gauge on it then take reading on wheel. That was the approach I took
The problem with that you need to zero your gauge twice. Once for the left side wheels and once for the right side wheels. When you zero a gauge its only good for the same orientation this is because the

zero function of most gauges is only set reference point to zero, it doesn't allow for a 180 degree rotation.

Now the calibration of the gauge requires you to rotate the gauge 180 degree to find true level.

If your gauge zero functions works with a 180 degree rotation, this would be the first gauge that I found does this.
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Old Yesterday, 12:42 PM
  #67  
revitup
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Now the calibration of the gauge requires you to rotate the gauge 180 degree to find true level.
Don't understand why that would be. I don't rotate my gauge180 degrees side to side.

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Old Yesterday, 12:54 PM
  #68  
cagotzmann
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Originally Posted by revitup View Post
Don't understand why that would be. I don't rotate my gauge180 degrees side to side.
Here is my gauge. It will rotate 180 degrees, yours you align left side and right side of the gauge from side to side.


If you leave the gauge on your setup as mounted and go to the other side, it also rotates 180 degrees. So then the reading will be off.

Last edited by cagotzmann; Yesterday at 12:56 PM.
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Old Yesterday, 03:04 PM
  #69  
akdale
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Originally Posted by cagotzmann View Post
The problem with that you need to zero your gauge twice. Once for the left side wheels and once for the right side wheels. When you zero a gauge its only good for the same orientation this is because the

zero function of most gauges is only set reference point to zero, it doesn't allow for a 180 degree rotation.

Now the calibration of the gauge requires you to rotate the gauge 180 degree to find true level.

If your gauge zero functions works with a 180 degree rotation, this would be the first gauge that I found does this.
I use the Wixey as well. my initial use was blade angle on my tablesaw. I do agree on zeroing once at each tire. I actually did this without the long straight edge at the center of tire on the garage floor and thought this would be "ok" as well. Before hitting the road I am going to try with straight edge and compare.

My process was zero on the floor, expecting 90 to be perfect up and down (just like my saw blade to table top) so readings on either side of 90 were my degree angles. this just avoided using clamps. I us the magnets on the bottom. I do agree on the rotation from side to side but if your zeroing at each tire then that becomes a moot point ??

Last edited by akdale; Yesterday at 03:14 PM.
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