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1976 corvette autocross project

 
Old 05-21-2019, 09:23 AM
  #21  
jim2527
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1. Driving lessons. I took a class years ago and was taught how to properly drive auto-x by national champions. The cost was reasonable and my driving was vastly improved.

2. 3 of the big vendors have awesome packages or you can buy them piece by piece. Van Steel cars are fast. Detroit Speed cars are fast. Ridetech cars are fast.

3. As mentioned by 69autoxr Tires, tires, tires.
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Old 05-21-2019, 09:50 AM
  #22  
gbvette62
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After reading over your posts, I'm wondering if you are interested in autocrossing, or high performance driving days? The reason I ask is because you mentioned SCDA, and though I'm not real familiar with them, I thought they primarily run HPDE events, and not timed competitions?

An autocross is a timed event, run against the clock by one car at a time, over on race course, either a temporary course set up using pylons, or on a permanent race track like Lime Rock. In autocross, cars are broken into classes based on similar speed characteristics and modifications. A high performance driving experience (HPDE) is run on permanent race tracks, and run groups are usually based on driver experience, and not the car, leaving modifications pretty much completely open. HPDE events aren't usually considered competition events, but are run more for fun and a test of a drivers abilities.

If you are interested in autocross, the link below will tell you everything you could ever want to know about how to run autocross with the SCCA. Classes, glossary of terms, how to find an autocross, and more, including a link to the PDF of the complete SCCA Solo rule book, are all on the SCCA's autocross page. How other organizations handle classes and rules may vary a little, but will likely be similar. Until you figure out where you plan on running, and who you want to run with, this should give you a good idea of what modifications are and aren't allowed in each class, if you plan to try autocrossing.

If autocrossing is what you want to try, please heed the warnings of others here, and figure out where and who you're going to run with, and what their rules are, BEFORE making any modifications. Shocks and sway bars are usually open in just about any group or class you race in, but mods like tubular a-arms may put you in a class with purpose built race cars.

https://www.scca.com/pages/autocross
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Old 05-21-2019, 01:12 PM
  #23  
CA_WxMan
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I'll second what others have said already :

1. Go search youtube for C3 Corvette Autocross or something similar and you'll find a slew of videos of pro built/driven cars from DSE, Ridetech, Danny Popp and others, as well as some of us "regular guys". Also look on youtube or on the Ridetech Facebook page for Goodguys Autocross videos. Make sure that this what you're talking about when you say autocross, rather than a "Track Day" event on a large road course.
2. Find an organization near you that's running autocross events. Check for SCCA SOLO events, Goodguys events, and also look at MotorsportsReg.com
3. Go visit during an event and get a ride-along, if available.
4. Figure out which organization you're going to run with and see where your car fits into their rules and what modifications you'll be allowed to do.
5. Get a good, performance oriented alignment. Vansteel and others have suggested specs to get you started and you can always ask here too, just be prepared for a variety of answers and theories. There's a ton of good information and very experienced members here, but I've seen it be overwhelming for some newcomers.
6. TIRES! A sticky 200 tread-wear performance tire makes a world of difference. If possible, buy them in a full set of 4 and try to keep the same size front & rear. That way, you can rotate them front-to-rear after each event, so that they'll wear evenly. Also, you'll avoid situations like I just had, where I replaced the two front tires, but not the rears (they looked like they still had some life in them) and it through the balance of the car way off. I had tons of front grip, but that made the rear really loose.
7. SEAT TIME! Once you start running, try to get as much seat time as possible, preferably with an experienced driver/coach riding along.

Now back to your original question about upgrading the car.
- I already mention alignment and tires, but a good set of shocks would be next.
- If you don't already have them, add a rear sway bar and upgrade the front to the 1 1/8".
- Make sure that the bushings, ball joints, tie rod ends, and strut rods are all in good condition.
- Brake pads should probably be next. A lot of people have had good luck with the EBC YellowStuff pads. Just be sure to upgrade both the front and rear.
- After that, there are many options or paths to take. If it has good springs with a decent rate, then I would suggest replacing the upper control arms with an adjustable set from SPC that will allow you to get more camber and caster. However, if the springs are old and soft, I'd replace those first.
- From there, I'd probably go with a Borgeson steering box and the Ridetech brace for it. The box will improve the steering ratio and get rid of the leaky slave cylinder & hoses, and the Ridetech brace will keep it solid and help prevent cracking around the mounting points.

After that, there's many more possible options, it just depends on what your budget is and what your rules allow.

Good luck and have fun out there.
-Chris
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Old 05-23-2019, 01:06 AM
  #24  
Dbcrusader36
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Originally Posted by CA_WxMan View Post
I'll second what others have said already :

1. Go search youtube for C3 Corvette Autocross or something similar and you'll find a slew of videos of pro built/driven cars from DSE, Ridetech, Danny Popp and others, as well as some of us "regular guys". Also look on youtube or on the Ridetech Facebook page for Goodguys Autocross videos. Make sure that this what you're talking about when you say autocross, rather than a "Track Day" event on a large road course.
2. Find an organization near you that's running autocross events. Check for SCCA SOLO events, Goodguys events, and also look at MotorsportsReg.com
3. Go visit during an event and get a ride-along, if available.
4. Figure out which organization you're going to run with and see where your car fits into their rules and what modifications you'll be allowed to do.
5. Get a good, performance oriented alignment. Vansteel and others have suggested specs to get you started and you can always ask here too, just be prepared for a variety of answers and theories. There's a ton of good information and very experienced members here, but I've seen it be overwhelming for some newcomers.
6. TIRES! A sticky 200 tread-wear performance tire makes a world of difference. If possible, buy them in a full set of 4 and try to keep the same size front & rear. That way, you can rotate them front-to-rear after each event, so that they'll wear evenly. Also, you'll avoid situations like I just had, where I replaced the two front tires, but not the rears (they looked like they still had some life in them) and it through the balance of the car way off. I had tons of front grip, but that made the rear really loose.
7. SEAT TIME! Once you start running, try to get as much seat time as possible, preferably with an experienced driver/coach riding along.

Now back to your original question about upgrading the car.
- I already mention alignment and tires, but a good set of shocks would be next.
- If you don't already have them, add a rear sway bar and upgrade the front to the 1 1/8".
- Make sure that the bushings, ball joints, tie rod ends, and strut rods are all in good condition.
- Brake pads should probably be next. A lot of people have had good luck with the EBC YellowStuff pads. Just be sure to upgrade both the front and rear.
- After that, there are many options or paths to take. If it has good springs with a decent rate, then I would suggest replacing the upper control arms with an adjustable set from SPC that will allow you to get more camber and caster. However, if the springs are old and soft, I'd replace those first.
- From there, I'd probably go with a Borgeson steering box and the Ridetech brace for it. The box will improve the steering ratio and get rid of the leaky slave cylinder & hoses, and the Ridetech brace will keep it solid and help prevent cracking around the mounting points.

After that, there's many more possible options, it just depends on what your budget is and what your rules allow.

Good luck and have fun out there.
-Chris
Thank you sir
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