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Restoring parts....some help

Old 01-07-2019, 11:17 AM
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Default Restoring parts....some help

Hey Guys,

I am going to be tearing down the rear end to replace some bushing, bearings, and restore some parts. I wanted to know what people typical use for restoration. Do I need to buy chemicals or just a few tools. For example, i am going to clean up some metal parts, like the leaf springs. I will need to remove all the rust and repaint them. Should I get an angle grinder (I see a lot of videos using it, but I was unsure if i really needed that)? I already have a bench grinder with a brass brush. Do I need to get a steel one of car parts?

Thanks for the suggestions.
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Old 01-07-2019, 11:56 AM
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From what I understand, your goal is to not only make it work good, but look good. That means removing all the old paint, rust and dirt, off've the old parts. Your bench grinder, needs to be set up with two steel brushes, one coarse and one fine and this will do for the small parts. Brass is too soft for this work. Next, from experience, you're going to need to use air tools to accomplish the work on the big parts and areas. Electric or Battery Operated Angle Grinders and Drills have too much torque for this kind of work. They tend to grab bolts, angles and corners and deflect with a vengeance, often damaging adjacent areas or even yourself. You also need a lot of muscle to control them. Air Tools rely on very high speed and are far easier to control. You can also adjust the air pressure coming from the compressor and with careful practice on the button, you can run them, really slow on delicate or tight areas, or wide open at 5,000 RPM, without the 'grabby' torque factor. I've done whole engine compartments, including the frame in a day or two, down to the bare metal. If you don't have one, you'll need a compressor with at least a 25 gallon tank and a good sized motor of at least 3 HP, to do the job. Notice how all the Auto Restoration shows on TV, use air? I rarely use chemicals, because it's messy, toxic and air, usually does the job.

I highly recommend the used, vintage Rockwell Air Drills that are on Ebay (pistol grip style). They last forever, and of course, you should always oil them, with air tool oil, before use. You should also have a die grinder, like an Ingersoll Rand, style, that takes the steel coarse and fine brushes (in various sizes and styles). The die grinders are smaller and work good for tight spots. Hope this helps.

PS: Don't forget eye protection and gloves. When I buy Safety Glasses, I often just slit the plastic on the packaging, not quite all the way around, so I can store them inside the protective plastic and this keeps them clean and dust free and the cardboard packaging, makes it easy to store and find later on.

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Old 01-07-2019, 12:04 PM
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For small parts I bought a cheap bench top sand blast cabinet for rust removal. For larger parts that won't fit in the cabinet such as the leaf spring sections I used an angle grinder with a wire wheel and several different grits of flap discs. I did my entire frame with the angle grinder also with wire wheels and flap discs. The main thing is safety equipment when using any kinds of grinders, wire wheels, etc.
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Old 01-07-2019, 12:51 PM
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I have another steel and brass brush for a power drill, but I can look into the air drills. I don't have a compressor big enough, only about 3 gallon for small stuff.

I didn't know they made different courses with steel brushes. I thought a steel brush is a steel brush. I guess I have seen the ones that has the wires twisted together into bunches. That seems pretty extreme for this though.
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Old 01-07-2019, 01:19 PM
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After getting the leaf spring out, dont be surprised if you don't feel like putting it back in. The composite springs are a LOT lighter, and feel better on my car. My only regret was not getting an even stiffer spring. Same thing with the strut rods. The heim-jointed units work much better.

I sent my trailing arms out to be rebuilt. Otherwise, a drill with a wire wheel, and a wire wheel on a grinder, did the bulk of the work. I'm especially proud of the rear calipers, which really cleaned up with the wheel.
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Old 01-07-2019, 01:28 PM
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The coarseness is very helpful, because on the really ugly stuff, you can knock it down with a course brush, really quickly and it has a longer life, than the fine brushes. They sell the brushes in both wire wheels (horizontal) and cup brushes (vertical), both are a necessity, because they can work different areas.


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Old 01-07-2019, 02:03 PM
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Originally Posted by Bikespace View Post
After getting the leaf spring out, dont be surprised if you don't feel like putting it back in. The composite springs are a LOT lighter, and feel better on my car. My only regret was not getting an even stiffer spring. Same thing with the strut rods. The heim-jointed units work much better.

I sent my trailing arms out to be rebuilt. Otherwise, a drill with a wire wheel, and a wire wheel on a grinder, did the bulk of the work. I'm especially proud of the rear calipers, which really cleaned up with the wheel.
Where did you send them too? With the rear bearings needing to be packed, I have to have them out anyway. Depending on cost, i could send those out.

I went back and forth on the composite vs steel springs. End result was cost and i think I restore what is there. I don't replace if i don't have too, i prefer to fix if i can. In the event its all too much, i can always buy one. But they are pricey.
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Old 01-07-2019, 02:13 PM
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I sent mine to Bairs. They did a great job, including blasting, relocating the parking brake bracket, and powder coating, It was NOT cheap, but much of that was for things I'd have had to fix anyway (both caliper mounts, strut/shock bolts). Were I to do it over, I'd insist on doing the rotor runout myself, rather than rivet on the rotors.

Mobird has a thread on the budget DIY route, which is worth looking up.

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Old 01-07-2019, 03:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Bikespace View Post
I sent mine to Bairs. They did a great job, including blasting, relocating the parking brake bracket, and powder coating, It was NOT cheap, but much of that was for things I'd have had to fix anyway (both caliper mounts, strut/shock bolts). Were I to do it over, I'd insist on doing the rotor runout myself, rather than rivet on the rotors.

Mobird has a thread on the budget DIY route, which is worth looking up.
ya, I drilled out my rivets on the rotors already and don't plan to replace them. I got all new break calipers last year. Mine were all leaking fluid like crazy. Couldn't rebuild them. So that part is not needed. I don't plan to paint the calipers since you can't see them through the wheels. Just leave whatever protective coating they have so they dont' rust and be down with it.

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Old 01-07-2019, 03:34 PM
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I rebuilt and cleaned the rear section of my car. New bushings and new control arms. Wire wheeled everything and rust proofed and painted everything. What I got out of it is that some of the small brackets and pieces aren't worth the time to do them and it is best to find ones better than yours or new..Mine were rusted and some had pitting in them. And the amount of time it took me to clean them and then get them to look good wasn't worth the time and to get new was the answer. I decided when I did the front half any bracket or bolt that was to far rusted would just be replaced instead of soaking it in rust remover and sanding it and then painting it. You can always get money but can't make up the time wasted.
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Old 01-07-2019, 03:42 PM
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Originally Posted by 540 vette View Post
I rebuilt and cleaned the rear section of my car. New bushings and new control arms. Wire wheeled everything and rust proofed and painted everything. What I got out of it is that some of the small brackets and pieces aren't worth the time to do them and it is best to find ones better than yours or new..Mine were rusted and some had pitting in them. And the amount of time it took me to clean them and then get them to look good wasn't worth the time and to get new was the answer. I decided when I did the front half any bracket or bolt that was to far rusted would just be replaced instead of soaking it in rust remover and sanding it and then painting it. You can always get money but can't make up the time wasted.
I agree 100%. I don't plan to restore every nut and bolt. That would take forever!! At a couple of dollars or less per bolt\nut....just replace.
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Old 01-07-2019, 07:58 PM
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Originally Posted by Bikespace View Post
I sent mine to Bairs. They did a great job, including blasting, relocating the parking brake bracket, and powder coating, It was NOT cheap, but much of that was for things I'd have had to fix anyway (both caliper mounts, strut/shock bolts). Were I to do it over, I'd insist on doing the rotor runout myself, rather than rivet on the rotors.

Mobird has a thread on the budget DIY route, which is worth looking up.
Do not have the rotors riveted back on due to they do not need to be nor are required to be riveted on....and if they are riveted back on after a company does the rear wheel bearings......you can run into problems like I have run into when the rotors were turned down to get the run-out correct. When a customer chose to send his out instead of me rebuilding the trailing arms...you can see what I came across. thankfully I did not assume it was good and actually inspected them.

IF I need to have the rotors riveted on due to someone JUST HAS TO have them that way. Then I know how to index the rotor run-out prior to me riveting the rotors back on.

https://www.corvetteforum.com/forums...e-warning.html

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Old 01-07-2019, 08:30 PM
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Just a little reminder of when you are using those wire wheels, SAFETY FIRST!!!!

Those things are nasty!! Safety googles, masks and thick clothing is a must. Those errant wires are dangerous
Here are some photos. This,




Did this after going through a heavy sweatshirt and heavy sweater,


So I cannot stress the safety factor.

Has anyone figured out a product that is clear but can go over some rust since it is almost impossible to get every spec of rust out and I like to keep the bear metal parts unpainted but coated to keep them from rerusting? I have some rust coming through some of the cleaned up and clear coated components. Here are some before and after of my work but within 4 months I can see some rust coming through. Ike



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Old 01-07-2019, 08:50 PM
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Yes, to what F22 offered. Everything offered and tool recommendations is right on.
I also will try to steer you to Bairs for your trailing arm work. Extremely good at what they do and nice to work with as well.
Good luck,
RM
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Old 01-08-2019, 03:38 AM
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Originally Posted by general ike View Post
Just a little reminder of when you are using those wire wheels, SAFETY FIRST!!!!

Those things are nasty!! Safety googles, masks and thick clothing is a must. Those errant wires are dangerous
Here are some photos. This,




Did this after going through a heavy sweatshirt and heavy sweater,


So I cannot stress the safety factor.

Has anyone figured out a product that is clear but can go over some rust since it is almost impossible to get every spec of rust out and I like to keep the bear metal parts unpainted but coated to keep them from rerusting? I have some rust coming through some of the cleaned up and clear coated components. Here are some before and after of my work but within 4 months I can see some rust coming through. Ike


Have you tried Krud Kutter? From the website...
Krud KutterŪ The Must for Rust is a unique rust remover and inhibitor. It removes and prevents rust in one step. It protects bare metal for up to 12 months. It can be applied by brush, dip, roller or spray. It also etches new galvanized metal.
The proprietary water-base formula penetrates into voids on the metal surface and dissolves rust and oxidation through chemical action. Small rust-inhibiting crystals are formed and become integral with the surface molecules of the metal to resist future rusting.
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Old 01-08-2019, 09:29 AM
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That looks pretty good. Great job General ike!!!
I hope mine comes out looking that good.

MickP, do you have any other products. I wouldn't want to have to reclean all my parts every 12 months.
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Old 01-08-2019, 09:36 AM
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Originally Posted by F22 View Post
From what I understand, your goal is to not only make it work good, but look good.
Just to be clear, why can't it be both?
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Old 01-08-2019, 09:57 AM
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I use this product in certain applications and it works very well BUT it depends on how much the area is subjected to environmental contaminates. I have seen areas that have held up over the two years they state on parts that are on the car and outside.

https://www.lpslabs.com/product-details/612

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Old 01-08-2019, 10:08 AM
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Exactly, but take a typical auto shop, front suspension rebuild. Oh, they'll do it right, align it and all, but they're not going to clean and respray all the bits and pieces either. I've seen this applied to engine builds as well. And sometimes, because the only parts you can find are used, you have to clean it up, as best you could.
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Old 01-09-2019, 12:05 AM
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~Stingray the trick is to keep it looking like that and still use the car. I have some rust sneaking back in already.
Mick I tried that product or something similar a few weeks ago, but I was walking out the door when I tried it. It left a odd milky coating to the metal, not the finish I was hoping for. I wanted to try to capture that cast, raw metal look without painting and prevent it from re rusting. I tried a few clear coats but I did not pay enough attention to which went were. I am seeing rust come back on the lower shock supports and the connecting rods. I wonder if any of the clear coats, enamel, varnish, lacquer etc are better then others?

Thanks Ike
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